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Ive recently changed to a vegetarian diet, thinking of going vegan as i dont drink milk, eat honey or dairy unless its in like a choclate bar... anyway not the point

my point is, my previous FAVOURITE PIZZA was a sweet chili chicken pizza which is forzen and hasnt been cooked yet. My question is, if i take the frozen chicken peices off can i still eat that pizza and add quorn peices instead?

There is literally only 1 pizza in my local supermarket that is veggie so i was curious.

I wouldnt go to the extent of picking chicken out of ''chicken mayo'' etc thats just too far.

I just want to know if i can take off frozen chicken peices off pizza before i cook it ?

thanks
 

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Ive recently changed to a vegetarian diet, thinking of going vegan as i dont drink milk, eat honey or dairy unless its in like a choclate bar... anyway not the point

my point is, my previous FAVOURITE PIZZA was a sweet chili chicken pizza which is forzen and hasnt been cooked yet. My question is, if i take the frozen chicken peices off can i still eat that pizza and add quorn peices instead?

There is literally only 1 pizza in my local supermarket that is veggie so i was curious.

I wouldnt go to the extent of picking chicken out of ''chicken mayo'' etc thats just too far.

I just want to know if i can take off frozen chicken peices off pizza before i cook it ?

thanks
It wouldn't be vegetarian because there would still be leftover chicken fat stuck to it, also if you have gone vegetarian to help animals consider that picking chicken off and throwing it away doesn't help anything if you have already paid money for it.

Perhaps you could make your own version with quorn? You can often buy premade pizza crusts, sauce, cheese etc so it would probably be pretty easy to recreate.
 
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The suffering and death of chickens is going to be the same regardless of whether you eat it, or throw away. Buying chicken is never an ethically good decision. Once you've bought the pizza, whether you throw it away or eat it will make no further difference ethically speaking.

Still, the amount of ethical bad caused by those few pieces is a lot less than a whole chicken breast or a steak. If this is what it takes for you to be vegetarian, and you are just going to give up otherwise, then do it I guess.

However, I'm not sure you really need to ask permission of anyone to do what you want.

I think the pizza actually still is vegetarian if you pick off the chicken, and so would you be. More than half the definitions of vegetarians refer to meat/flesh and nothing else small amounts of left over fat do not constitute meat in my view. Also, I don't think we should be so strict in interpreting these definitions. However, all of this is very debatable.

Of course it's true that you could recreate the pizza with effort and I hope you do. But all of us are, in some way, trading off ethics vs convenience in our life. It becomes a question of how much time and effort you are willing to spend to achieve slightly better ethical outcomes, which is just an exercise in arbitrarily drawing a line.

I suggest you don't buy the pizza, but would happily respect whatever you choose. Best of luck.
 

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Might also want to add that "proper" mozzarella is not even vegetarian itself. The "mozzarella-style" stuff is, but if the word style isn't there then it is required to be made with animal rennet. As far as I know, this is the only dairy cheese that requires animal rennet to be marketed as genuine.

But yes, once you pay for the chicken/cow/pig/etc meat it has financially supported the killing, and as such supported the continuation of animal breeding to replace the sold stock.

When I was vegetarian I had to look specifically for cheeses that didn't have animal rennet in them. Cabot was my friend back then, as all (most?) of their cheese blocks used plant rennet. Luckily that is all a distant memory for me now though.
 

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If you are buying a chicken pizza then deciding to throw all the chicken pieces, then what's the point of being a vegan? Don't waste your money by buying chicken pizza then. Pizza contains cheese, which is a dairy product and not vegan for your kind info.

If you strongly wish to be vegan, then don't buy pizza. Try to make your own vegan pizza without cheese.

Try making fruit pizza. It's delicious as I make this for my family. You can find the recipes on google.
 

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I feel this depends on your personal "ick factor." I'm sure loads of people have the experience of being told by meat-eaters that as vegetarians or vegans we "can"/"should" just pull off, or eat around, the animal ingredients.

I tell them the story of "Underwear Soup:" I have a terrific recipe for underwear soup. I collect as much underwear as I can, and add it to a pot with onions, garlic, potatoes, herbs and spices, and broth. Lots of good healthy ingredients. It cooks a long time on the stove. But sometimes when guests come over for dinner they say "ew, but I won't eat underwear!!" So I tell them "don't worry, you can just pick it out of your bowl."

For me taking off the meat or cheese etc. doesn't matter, the result is still disgusting.

If you're trying vegan, the previous comments are true - buying that item equals supporting animal exploitation. Of course a vegetarian supports exploitation if they eat dairy/egg anyway so this is not as much of an issue.

But I understand when something is your favorite, it's hard to imagine anything better. Our tastes do change, and it takes surprisingly little time. It might happen that after a couple of months of buying the frozen veggie pizza instead (and maybe adding your own sweet chili sauce or other goodies), you have a new fave and the old fave tastes odd.

If the question is "will taking off the meat impact the cooking/cook time?" you should probably contact the manufacturer.
 

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You could do that (take the meat off). But as I see it, buying a food and then taking the meat off it defeats the purpose of vegetarianism or veganism, at least if your reason for going veg is to avoid harming animals. Whether or not you eat it, your having bought it creates a demand for that food- a demand that can only be met by killing animals.

I don't know if you like the vegan and vegetarian meat substitutes that are available these days, but I do! (Maybe I'm easy to please.) If you like them, you could use them to make your own pizza from scratch, or buy an otherwise-acceptable vegetarian pizza and add the meat substitute to it as a topping.
 

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I recently ordered online Meat & Seafood from Vons. Presumably at any rate medium. I would disregard it and utilize a meat thermometer and take the dish out when it arrives at the 'doneness' that I need, for my situation medium-uncommon undoubtedly. Perhaps the most often referenced ecological expense of eating meat is the CO2 associated with delivering it. Contrasted with foods grown from the ground, the measure of CO2 delivered by the creation of meat is amazingly high. Obviously, the world isn't going to surrender meat. Truth be told, with the development of the working class in nations like India and China, more meat is being devoured than at any other time.
 

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Quite right, define for yourself what exactly you mean under the word vegetarianism and the meaning you put in the rejection of meat. My brother refused to eat meat and was a staunch vegan for many years. He did it for health; supposedly, meat only clogs and harms his body. Then our father started raising noble cattle and found Angus embryos for sale. As a result, the whole family was involved in his farming business. After a couple of months, my brother tasted meat for the first time after many years of abstinence. Now he won't trade it for anything. LOL.
 

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I would say that buying a pizza with meat on it then discarding the meat is worse (from a ethical point of view) than actually eating leftover meat from someone else’s plate. My reason being that you have contributed to the demand by buying it. Arguably, eating leftovers that have already been bought doesn’t make any difference to animal welfare (although it’s not something I’d do and would make you non-vegetarian).
 
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