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I bookmarked this article three years ago - I'm surprised it's still accessible - because I was, and still am, fascinated by the phenomenon of synesthesia. I was wondering who here has heard of it, or might even know somebody who has it. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/thinking.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":think:"><br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><b>Real Rhapsody in Blue<br><br>
A quirky phenomenon that scientists once dismissed could help explain the creativity of the human brain</b><br><br>
By Anne Underwood<br><br>
Newsweek<br><br>
Updated: 3:02 a.m. PT Nov 25, 2003<br><br>
Dec. 1 issue - As a child, Julian Asher had a theory about the symphony concerts he attended with his parents. I thought they turned down the lights so you could see the colors better, he says, describing the Fantasia-like scenes that danced before his eyes. Asher wasnt hallucinating. Hes a synesthetea rare person for whom one type of sensory input (such as hearing music) evokes an additional one (such as seeing colors). In Ashers ever-shifting vision, violins appear as a rich burgundy, pianos a deep royal purple and cellos the mellow gold of liquid honey.<br><br><br><br>
IT WASNT UNTIL Asher began studying neuroscience at Harvard six years ago that he learned there was a name for this phenomenonsynesthesia, from the Greek roots syn (together) and aesthesis (perception).</div>
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<br><br><br><a href="http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/3540645/" target="_blank">http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/3540645/</a>
 

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I've heard of it. I had briefly heard about it in a column a few years ago and been intruiged; about a year ago I saw a documentary about it on the BBC.<br><br>
It's really interesting. But I don't have it and don't know anyone with it so I'm more into reading the information than contributing to it <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D"> sorry <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":p">
 

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I strongly associate things like people, letters, and temperatures with colors. I find "A" to be pale red, "B" to be greyish-blue, "C" to be pinkish-yellow, etc. I also find that letters and numbers as well as colors have "genders". A is female, B is male, C is female, red is female, blue is male, etc.
 

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I'm not a synasthete by any means, but I associate different weekdays with different colours. For example, I think Monday is white, Tuesday is red and Wednesday is green. But I'm not sure about days like Sunday.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Gnome Chomsky</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I've experienced this.<br><br>
I am not a synaesthete.<br><br>
I'll leave it to you to put two and two together.<br><br><br><br>
ebola</div>
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Ditto.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Sevenseas</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I'm not a synasthete by any means, but I associate different weekdays with different colours. For example, I think Monday is white, Tuesday is red and Wednesday is green. But I'm not sure about days like Sunday.</div>
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yes. I do this. I remember it being 'clearer' to me when I was younger though.
 

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That could be a pain in the ass while driving, operating heavy machinery or playing sports.
 

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>>That could be a pain in the ass while driving, operating heavy machinery or playing sports.>><br><br><br><br>
We'd need to hear from the synaesthetes themselves, as others likely have NO real grasp of what this experience is like.<br><br>
...<br><br>
One interesting thing is that color-crossover synaesthetes exhibit an EXTREMELY reliable color-mapping, down to the same exact hue out of the sixteen million computers can typically possibly display, every single time.<br><br>
(I was involved in some preliminary research on synaesthesia a couple years ago.)<br><br><br><br>
ebola
 
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