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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,

Once in awhile, I like to kinda test myself by cutting things out of my diet for awhile...and I'm thinking about going a few months without sugar. This kinda helps me get used to cutting it out, so in the future, I will use it less and less...making me a healthier person in the long-run. I was wondering what this would include besides obvious (candy, pop, etc.) Do natural sugars in fruits and maybe bread count? If you guys could maybe give me a list of things that are definately out and things that are fine for me to eat, it would be great. Thank ya
 

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Probabably the main reason why added sugar is thought to be bad is it contains calories and nothing else. I agree that cutting added sugar out of your diet is definately a positive thing. It should increase the amount of other nutrients in your diet and make your diet more like the diet humans evolved on.. This evolutionary thing is important because our bodies are adapted to the way people ate during their evolution.

I wouldn't go as far as cutting out naturally occuring sugars such as in fruit. That would mean that you wouldn't be able to eat fruit. Fruit is healthy and when humans were evolving they ate fruit.

If you want to cut out bread you can and replace it with other grain sources. But bread usually doesn't have much sugar; a small amount is added to improve levening and to make the crust darker. It is possible to make bread without sugar. Blackstrap molasses is a substitute. Molasses goes well in certain types of bread such as pumpernickel and raisin bread. I haven't tried it but am sure it wouldn't be bad in whole wheat bread.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I figured I wouldn't have to give up fruit, I was just wondering...because I've heard of people going on sugar-free diets and I just kinda needed some help of what to cut out, ya know? Would you guess it would just be things like concentrated juices, candy, and the obvious? Or do you think it would involve other foods?
 

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Natural sugars in fruit don't count. In fact, sugar as a whole isn't a problem. It's how it's used.

For example, a piece of pineapple has a lot of sugar in it. BUT, the fruit also contains fibre and a mix of vitamins and minerals. This combination allows your body to digest it properly and you get the benefits of the sugar (taste, energy) while getting the added benefits of fibre (more filling) and nutritents (keeps you healthy).

Let's take that piece of pineapple and soak it in a container of sugary pineapple juice. Suddenly, you're adding a lot more then nature intended. Nature did not intend for that much sugar to be in the pineapple. Your body has a harder time with the sugar influx and crashes and burns by mid-day.

We have a sweet tooth for a reason. It's fine to cut out sweets mostly, but don't cut it out all together. Enjoy a treat once and a while.
 

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Those who must closely monitor their triglycerides and diabetics do monitor even their fruit sugar. It is because of medical crises, not because of staying healthy.

Peanut butters such a Jiff and Skippy are full of sugar. Catsup is another high sugar food. Most cereal (sugar coated or not) is high in sugar. On American food products there is a category devoted to sugars. Check labels. You will find funny things such as the brand of raisin bran that sugars their raisins actually has less total sugar per serving then the brand with unsugered raisins.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks guys, I'm starting to understand more. So, does organic peanut butter have less sugar? Or different brands? Also, how about other basic foods? What do I need to watch out for?
 

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Kamila, yes that is true, but Joy didn't mention any medical problems, so I assume this is for "general" health, not specific health.

My mother is a diabetic and, while she has to monitor fruit, she eats as much of it as she wants and has nearly elinimated it from the rest of her foods (getting rid of most processed foods was the easiest way).

For peanut butter, you should look for "natural peanut butter" which is sometimes different then "organic." "Natural" just has nuts in it. Nothing else. I've seen some organic peanut butters with as many sugars as "Jiffy" style butters.
 

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i am 3 days away from finishing my three month cleanse. the cleanse was mainly for my problems with candida (yeast) and since candida feeds off sugar my cleanse was strictly sugar free. i can give you some pointers but it really just depends how far you want to take it.

i had to avoid ALL sugar and this included fruits, with the exception of apples, bananas, and pears which are not as sweet as most fruits. i could not have honey or maple syrup but i could have brown rice syrup. i couldnt have "glucose-fructose" (found in a lot of products), and i couldn't eat most breads.. i generally ate rye bread and spelt/kamut bread that was locally made with out yeast or sugar (sugar is often used to help yeast do its work). i had to buy soy/rice/almond milk that had no sugar added. i also couldnt have less-processed sugars like turbinado, demerrara, sucanat, cane sugar/juice, etc.

i hope that helps you a little bit. it seems like avoiding suagr is hard but i did not find it that difficult (and i only had a couple, tiny little cheats.. i swear). for my cleanse there were other things i had to avoid and i found tomatoes and potatoes especially hard to avoid.

xoxo
 

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oh yes.. the best way is to just read the ingredients.. if it says sugar, cane sugar, evaporated cane sugar, honey, maple syrup, flucose fructose and so on.. just dont get it.
 

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JoyFuLGurL7;

If you're getting off sugar just for nutritional reasons in my opinion there is no point in being a purist. Consuming a little added sugar isn't going to make a large difference in your diet. I mentioned that bread can be made without sugar. Well the amount of sugar in most breads is very small so I wouldn't worry about it if avoiding sugar in bread made my life more difficult.

Small amounts of sugar are sometimes used in cooking savory dishes. If I was avoiding sugar I wouldn't fuss about it if I ordered a savory dish at a restaurant. I would just avoid sweet dishes that were sweetened with added sugar.

Actually, I do avoid sugar. But I just avoid large amounts of added sugar. Sometimes I eat sweet things because I like them but I make sure that they aren't a large part of my diet.
 

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I don't want to discourage you. I think it's a good idea to cut out added sugar as much as possible. It's up to you how far you want to go.

But, nutritionally, I don't think that a small amount of added sugar in your diet would do much harm.

Yeah, avoiding things packed with sugar is a must. And there are easy things people can do to avoid added sugar like choosing a different peanut butter and a different cereal. Some fruit juices have corn syrup and others don't. Corn syrup, like sugar, is a source of empty calories so it's best to choose juices without it.
 

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when i did my doctor recommended

only two serves a fruit a day and no fruit juice as it goes directlty into your blood stream, also no sugar in anything

One fo the reasons sugar is so bad is that yeast multiplies with a small amount of sugar by getting rid of sugar you are stopping the multiplying
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Janette,

I just went over your post and was wondering if you felt different during your clease? Like...healthier in certain ways? I'm not sure why I want to do this, I just feel the need to, like you did, cleanse myself from it.
 

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i did it mainly because i was having problems with what i thought were yeast-infections and similar things. i did notice a change as far as this goes. i also lost weight, my hair looks healthier, my skin and my over all appearance are apparently 'healthier' (according to friends). i also saw a bit of a change in energy. it feels good to cut out sugar. you just feel better when you eat better.

xoxo
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I agree with that last comment. IT's so weird that when I've just had a pretty horrible "food day" and haven't eaten right, I come home and cut up some veggies and put them in a salad, and it peps me up really quick. Also, that's awesome that you got all the other benefits as well.
 

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To get rid of most sugar from your diet that isn't in an obvious form like cookies or candy, it's best to free yourself as much as possible from prepared foods.

Salad dressings and bottled sauces (like spaghetti sauce and terriyaki) are notoriously loaded with sugar, as are boxed dinner mixes and some crackers.

If you make most of your food yourself from scratch you can avoid a lot of excess sugar. For instance, a vinaigrette whipped up at home will not only taste better and be devoid of sugar, but it is cheaper and fresher too. It's the prepackaged foods that really get us all when it comes to excess fat, sugar, and especially sodium.
 

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I don't eat any refined sugar just because I felt as if I was a sugar addict and had to go cold turkey. The only sugars I eat are fruit, fruit concentrate, and all-fruit jam. Occasionally I'll eat something that has brown rice syrup or some other minimally refined sugar in it, and I don't freak out though. My soy milk has barley extract and jobs tears extract in it, which I guess are sugars, and I don't worry about that. I haven't had white sugar in over a year and don't miss it at all.
 
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