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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
<a href="http:" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=UZsk89I0fsc</a><br>
In case you can't see the video (or just don't want to) here's the gist:<br>
The vast majority of mothers in an American survey rate their preschool children's diets as healthy (over 80%) however, only 0.2% of the children in the survey were actually eating well according to the <a href="http://www.cnpp.usda.gov/Publications/HEI/healthyeatingindex2005factsheet.pdf" target="_blank">Healthy Eating Index</a>!<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Abstract<br>
OBJECTIVES: To quantify maternal perceptions regarding the quality of their child's diet, and to identify factors associated with misperceptions.<br><br>
STUDY DESIGN: A representative sample of 2287 children aged 2-5 years from a cross-sectional study (GENESIS study) was used.<br><br>
METHODS: Maternal perceptions of the quality of their child's diet, child's and mother's anthropometric characteristics, and other characteristics (i.e. socio-demographic and lifestyle) were recorded. The actual quality of each child's diet was estimated using the Healthy Eating Index (HEI) score.<br><br>
RESULTS: Based on the HEI score, 18.3% of participants had a 'poor' diet, 81.5% had a diet which 'needs improvement' and only 0.2% had a 'good' diet. Almost 83% of mothers overestimated the quality of their child's diet. The overestimation rate was 86% among mothers who declared that they choose their child's food based on what they consider to be healthy, and 72% among those who reported that other factors play the predominant role in food choices for their child (P<0.001). Moreover, total energy intake as well as the intake of fruits, grains, vegetables, meat and milk was significantly higher among children whose mothers overestimated the quality of their diet.<br><br>
CONCLUSION: The vast majority of mothers overestimate the quality of their child's diet. Given that maternal perceptions regarding the quality of their child's diet are likely to be one of the predominant factors determining the child's food intake, health professionals should make mothers aware of the existence of particular dietary recommendations that their children should meet in order to eat a healthy diet.</div>
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Study link: <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19958913" target="_blank">http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19958913</a>
 

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I am not surprised. Most people do not know much if anything about nutrition and toddlers/preschoolers are notoriously picky eaters. Education is the key here. I don't know much about the classes taught in schools these days but I doubt there is comprehensive study about nutrition and there should be.
 

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That doesn't surprise me at all. Not one bit. I have 7 nieces and nephews (3 more on the way) and only 1 of them has a balanced diet. She's 5 and has one of the most balanced diets of any kid I know. Her Mom cooks almost every meal and while she does consume meat, she LOVES veggies best. Why? Because her parents introduced her to healthy foods at a young age, not french fries. It's so sad how many people regularly give their 4-5 year olds Lunchables and McDonalds for every meal.
 

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I was a preschool teacher and a community worker who did home visits and health screenings. The children either had a mostly home cooked traditional Mexican style diet or ate nothing but chips, ice cream, candies, cookies, sodas and fast food at home. The meals we served at the preschool (lunch and a snack) were made from scratch and pretty whole foods based omni meals with fruits and vegetables in every offering. This was usually the best meal and snack most of the children ate in the day.
 

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Well, just because it "needs improvement", doesn't mean that it's bad.<br><br>
I don't think I had a "good" diet when I was young either.
 

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When asked most everyone reflects that they are better, eat more healthfully, are more kind, more good looking etc than they really are. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/laugh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":lol:"> Ah, humans.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>*AHIMSA*</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2974008"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
When asked most everyone reflects that they are better, eat more healthfully, are more kind, more good looking etc than they really are. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/laugh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":lol:"> Ah, humans.</div>
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Better that than the opposite at least.
 

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Hey Ahimsa, I might need you on FB soon with my sister <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":p"> In the past she's tried to justify why it's okay to feed kids crap (she's notorious for giving her kids chicken nuggets numerous times a week, even though she's a "granola Mom) and I know you're the right person <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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Oh, I am sooooo there. Text me when you need me. I got your back! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> Tell me if you want me to be at 20%, 60% or HIGHER intensity and I'll follow your lead. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D">
 

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*waits patiently for the verbal lashing to begin* <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/laugh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":lol:">
 

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I don't know, I've seen the average school packed meal for a kid, it's something like a Lunchable (some of the worst food ever), cookies, soda/HFCS juice, and chips. Seriously. Or a meat sandwich on white bread, chips, fruit snacks, and a sugary drink.<br><br><br>
Oh wait, that was my school lunch in elementary school <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/laugh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":lol:"> (Not really, but I did eat pretty bad. We did have wheat bread and I only got soda on Fridays).
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Jinkies</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2974343"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I think maybe their standards are a bit too high if they found that only four out of 2000 kids had a good diet.</div>
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That's an interesting way to look at it. There is something to be said for the fact that most children in the US survive until adulthood despite their diets.<br><br>
But for the record, the standards were:<br>
Total Fruit (includes 100% juice) ≥0.8 cup equiv. per 1,000 kcal<br>
Whole Fruit (not juice) ≥0.4 cup equiv. per 1,000 kcal<br>
Total Vegetables ≥1.1 cup equiv. per 1,000 kcal<br>
Dark Green or Orange Vegetables and Legumes ≥0.4 cup equiv. per 1,000 kcal<br>
Total Grains ≥3.0 oz equiv. per 1,000 kcal<br>
Whole Grains ≥1.5 oz equiv. per 1,000 kcal<br>
Milk (including soy milk) ≥1.3 cup equiv. per 1,000 kcal<br>
Meat and Beans ≥2.5 oz equiv. per 1,000 kcal<br>
Oils ≥12 grams per 1,000 kcal<br>
Saturated Fat ≤7% of energy<br>
Sodium ≤0.7 gram per 1,000 kcal<br>
Calories from Solid Fats, Alcoholic beverages, and Added Sugars (SoFAAS) ≤20% of energy<br>
link: <a href="http://www.cnpp.usda.gov/Publications/HEI/healthyeatingindex2005factsheet.pdf" target="_blank">http://www.cnpp.usda.gov/Publication...5factsheet.pdf</a><br><br>
It's also worth noting:<br>
"About one-third of U.S. adults (33.8%) are obese. Approximately 17% (or 12.5 million) of children and adolescents aged 2—19 years are obese."<br><a href="http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/trends.html" target="_blank">http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/trends.html</a><br><br>
and<br>
"Most young people are not following the recommendations set forth in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans: of U.S. youth aged 6-19, 67% exceed dietary guidelines recommendations for fat intake, 72% exceed recommendations for saturated fat intake. In 2009, only 22.3% of high school students reported eating fruits and vegetables five or more times daily (when fried potatoes and potato chips are excluded) during the past 7 days."<br><a href="http://www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/nutrition/index.htm" target="_blank">http://www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/nutrition/index.htm</a>
 

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Before we get on our high horses about this, let's observe that the index they used is based on the much-VB-vilified food pyramid and places milk as 10% of a good diet and "meat and beans" is another 10%. With a scoring system based on this, I imagine that most of us would over-rate our children's (and our own) diets.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>paperhanger</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2974762"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Before we get on our high horses about this, let's observe that the index they used is based on the much-VB-vilified food pyramid and places milk as 10% of a good diet and "meat and beans" is another 10%. With a scoring system based on this, I imagine that most of us would over-rate our children's (and our own) diets.</div>
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Not me, especially since soy milk is included. No need for any horses here at all. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/shy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":shy:">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>ElaineV</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2974716"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
But for the record, the standards were:<br>
Total Fruit (includes 100% juice) ≥0.8 cup equiv. per 1,000 kcal<br>
Whole Fruit (not juice) ≥0.4 cup equiv. per 1,000 kcal<br>
Total Vegetables ≥1.1 cup equiv. per 1,000 kcal<br>
Dark Green or Orange Vegetables and Legumes ≥0.4 cup equiv. per 1,000 kcal<br>
Total Grains ≥3.0 oz equiv. per 1,000 kcal<br>
Whole Grains ≥1.5 oz equiv. per 1,000 kcal<br>
Milk (including soy milk) ≥1.3 cup equiv. per 1,000 kcal<br>
Meat and Beans ≥2.5 oz equiv. per 1,000 kcal<br>
Oils ≥12 grams per 1,000 kcal<br>
Saturated Fat ≤7% of energy<br>
Sodium ≤0.7 gram per 1,000 kcal<br>
Calories from Solid Fats, Alcoholic beverages, and Added Sugars (SoFAAS) ≤20% of energy</div>
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Thanks for posting their requirements for a "good" diet. In this case, I'd actually argue that their standards are just silly. My diet is fantastic. I eat an appropriate amount of calories and get everything I need to be healthy. I'm not good enough for them, though, since I never drink any sort of milk. I often miss out in other categories as well.<br><br>
The food pyramid is a decent guideline for people who can't or won't put in the effort to eat well. It's restrictive and specific enough that it's pretty hard to eat poorly if you follow the rules. But you can't look at the other way around and say that it's a <i>requirement</i> for a good diet. That's simply not true.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>paperhanger</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2974762"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Before we get on our high horses about this, let's observe that the index they used is based on the much-VB-vilified food pyramid and places milk as 10% of a good diet and "meat and beans" is another 10%. With a scoring system based on this, I imagine that most of us would over-rate our children's (and our own) diets.</div>
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Nobody is on a high horse. I don't even ride horses!<br><br>
Please don't read between the lines. I'm not insinutating anything, just sharing information. "The food pyramid is wrong" is NOT the right conclusion to draw from this study. The food pyramid may or may not be wrong, but that's not the highlighted issue here.<br><br>
Here's a link to the full published study: <a href="http://wealthandhealth.ltd.uk/articles/parents%20misconception.pdf" target="_blank">http://wealthandhealth.ltd.uk/articl...conception.pdf</a><br><br>
It says:<br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">higher consumption of meat, vegetables, fruits and milk was observed by children with mothers who overestimated the quality of their child’s diet. This implies that mothers are aware of the necessity for these foods in their child’s diet. However, they seem to ignore the fact that children should meet specific recommendations for the intake of all foods and micro- and macronutrients in order to have a healthy diet.</div>
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Since whole grains are part of the pyramid and they aren't mentioned here, this suggests that these kids were not getting enough whole grains. They may also be getting too much saturated fat.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>ElaineV</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2974814"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Nobody is on a high horse. I don't even ride horses!<br><br>
Please don't read between the lines. I'm not insinutating anything, just sharing information. "The food pyramid is wrong" is NOT the right conclusion to draw from this study. The food pyramid may or may not be wrong, but that's not the highlighted issue here.<br><br>
Here's a link to the full published study: <a href="http://wealthandhealth.ltd.uk/articles/parents%20misconception.pdf" target="_blank">http://wealthandhealth.ltd.uk/articl...conception.pdf</a><br><br>
It says:<br><br>
Since whole grains are part of the pyramid and they aren't mentioned here, this suggests that these kids were not getting enough whole grains. They may also be getting too much saturated fat.</div>
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I wasn't specifically calling anyone out - sorry if I came across that way. I was just calling out the source of the statistics and the values they represent. If you read other threads on this board condemning national nutrition standards and the food pyramid (in which even some posters on this thread have avidly participated), it's pretty clear that the foundation on which this study is based is held under scrutiny or contempt by very many people on VB.
 

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lol ok I didn't look at this study in depth but I had to laugh... What toddler "eats well?" Most of the toddlers I've ever met are stubbornly picky and have appetites smaller than sparrows.
 

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I have 3 yr old twins and I totally understand...most of my friends with kids the same age think their kids get a good diet, but their diet consists mostly of mac and cheese, nuggets, grilled cheese, and some fruit. These same people are shocked my kids will eat things most kids that young wont..like beans and broccoli, but it is all they have ever known. theres room for improvement in most kids that age...they are so picky. I give them lots of veggies, but they dont always eat what that study would call a serving...some days I think they are running just on air as they seem to eat nothing. Id be more interested in the diets of school age kids, the 3rd and 4th graders...I know my 4th grader eats way better now than she did when she was 3...but what we offer her is pretty much the same
 
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