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Hello vegetarians,<br><br>
I will become a vegetarian in August and wish to seek the advice of avid vegetarians! I will be starting medical school and will be extremely busy. I will have basically no time to cook, and am looking for a quick way to eat vegetarian meals and not constantly be hungry. Does anyone have a list of vegetarian foods that are especially filling?<br><br>
I also want to make sure i am eating the right combination of foods to get the nine essential amino acids. I do not want to run into a protein deficiency from eating vegetarian. From my understanding, there are groups of complementary proteins that can be combined to provide the necessary amino acids. Can someone summarize this for me? What do i need to eat to assure i get all the right amino acids?<br><br>
I am very open to ideas and want to hear what you all say! I am looking for foods that can be found at a regular grocery store (Krogers). I also have no problem eating similar/the same things everyday. I am looking for vegetarian things that are quick and filling. My ideas as of now are pre-made salads and peanut butter with wheat bread.<br><br>
Let me hear what you all say! I am open to resources/links to other websites that may be helpful.
 

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Here is a thread about a vegetarian feeling hungry when eating vegan. It has some good tips.<br><br>
As far as nutrition, I always recommend the books "Becoming Vegan" and "Becoming Vegetarian."<br><br>
Also, its becoming rather well know that you're only going to suffer a protein deficiency if A... You have a metabolic disorder and can't properly digest protein regardless of the source. Or B.... You're actually starving to death.<br><br>
Right now, I have a pot of boiling peanuts on the stove. Boiled Peanuts are a tradition in the South, which first started back when supplying food, and esp protein, to soldiers was a problem. Meat & eggs were not readily available, and food in general was scarce. The solders were able to roast and boil peanuts, which were everywhere because they are rotated with cotton to put certain elements back into the soil.
 

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Thanks for the tips and advice Hazelnut, also about Kroger I been to one of them last week and my Kroger has a section for Vegetarian and Vegans and Gluten free and Dairy free in the store.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>peacefulveglady</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2918805"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Thanks for the tips and advice Hazelnut, also about Kroger I been to one of them last week and my Kroger has a section for Vegetarian and Vegans and Gluten free and Dairy free in the store.</div>
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My Kroger does, too.<br><br>
I mostly watch for the discounted vegan items in the "manager's special" bin. That's really the only way I can afford to eat those nice vegan convenience foods. Sometimes, I'll buy the discounted (expired) item, and discover that its really worth paying full price for. I've gotten started on a lot of things that way.<br><br>
The produce in my Kroger has really gone downhill though. It's wilted, unripe, and overpriced. I get my produce for Bi-Lo or Food Lion.
 

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As long as you eat fairly balanced, you don't need to fret about protein.<br><br>
As for things that make you feel full, nuts work great. Also beans, brown rice, and vegetables, especially things like peas and corn. They're all fairly quick and easy to prepare.
 

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<a href="http://michaelbluejay.com/veg/protein.html" target="_blank">http://michaelbluejay.com/veg/protein.html</a><br><br><br>
Everything you wanted to know about protein*<br><br><br>
*but were afraid to ask
 

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<a href="http://www.vrg.org/nutshell/nutshell.htm" target="_blank">http://www.vrg.org/nutshell/nutshell.htm</a><br><br>
I like this little overview, it has some good basic nutrition info and some recipes.<br><br>
This is another nice guide:<br><br><a href="http://vegetarian.about.com/od/healthnutrition/f/Vegnutrition.htm" target="_blank">http://vegetarian.about.com/od/healt...gnutrition.htm</a><br><br>
If you eat your fruits and vegetables and don't just live on processed junk you'll do great on a vegetarian diet. You could even see a massive improvement in your health and energy levels, I know I did. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D"><br><br>
Welcome to Veggieboards! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/hi.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":hi:">
 

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Can I recommend this book? <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=veggieboards.com-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FNew-Becoming-Vegetarian-Essential-Healthy%2Fdp%2F1570671443" target="_blank">The New Becoming Vegetarian</a>. It really helped me transition into vegetarianism and subsequently veganism. It's pretty straight-forward, heavy on facts, largely unbiased, and written by two authors who both are RDs and one of whom has a Masters of Science in Nutrition.<br><br>
It breaks it all down simply: protein, carbs, fats, amino acids, calcium, phytochemicals, etc.
 

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There's yet <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=veggieboards.com-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FVegan-Life-Everything-Healthy-Plant-Based%2Fdp%2F0738214930%2Fref%3Dsr_1_1%3Fie%3DUTF8%26qid%3D1308651411%26sr%3D8-1" target="_blank">another good new book</a> that's not out yet but which is coming very soon. It's about veganism but all of the nutritional tips apply to vegetarians as well since vegans are vegetarians by default. If you can get enough protein on a vegan diet you can get more than enough as a vegetarian.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>sngoku89</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2918733"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I will become a vegetarian in August</div>
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That's rather specific. I'm puzzled <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":p"><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">I will have basically no time to cook</div>
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Do what I do - buy a slow cooker, cook up a big batch of food once a week & freeze/refrigerate it. Surely you will have a free hour or two once a week <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">From my understanding, there are groups of complementary proteins that can be combined to provide the necessary amino acids.</div>
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I think it's just a combination of beans & grains|seeds|nuts. Either group lacks some of the amino acids required, but so long as you eat from both you'll be fine.
 

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This is my concern as well. I had eaten meat for 42 years before making the decision to go vegetarian almost 7 months ago(vegan, while it appears a little healthier, was too big of a step for me) I often find myself falling off the wagon at night. Where my cravings used to center around sweets at this time, I find they are now protein"centric". I find myself eating 3/4 of a pound of sharp cheddar most nights at around 10pm! If not that, I am running to the store and getting a package of convenience store ham, which was disgusting to me in my meat-eating time, but I treat as if it were criminally delicious now. Rediculous. I will be interested to see some responses here, and hope to learn something as well.<br><br>
For the one who posted the slow-cooker comment, where could i find that info? I have several vegetarian cookbooks, but they all seem to center around pickled foods and beans!
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>convert</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2920120"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
This is my concern as well. I had eaten meat for 42 years before making the decision to go vegetarian almost 7 months ago(vegan, while it appears a little healthier, was too big of a step for me) I often find myself falling off the wagon at night. Where my cravings used to center around sweets at this time, I find they are now protein"centric". I find myself eating 3/4 of a pound of sharp cheddar most nights at around 10pm! If not that, I am running to the store and getting a package of convenience store ham, which was disgusting to me in my meat-eating time, but I treat as if it were criminally delicious now. Rediculous. I will be interested to see some responses here, and hope to learn something as well.<br><br>
For the one who posted the slow-cooker comment, where could i find that info? I have several vegetarian cookbooks, but they all seem to center around pickled foods and beans!</div>
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i would say you need to stuff yourself with beans, rice, potatoes, corn, and bananas - this aside from fresh veggies and fruits. if you eat these until there is no room left, then you won't be doing what you're doing now. don't worry about overeating. it will self balance over a few weeks. my medical understanding of what cheese and meat do to you has long destroyed my desire to consume them. after you get over the hump, so to speak... you'll find your palate has changed its taste. veggies are now the things i crave. my addiction runs to spicy, especially hot salsa <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">.
 

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keep with you at all times a bag of trail mix (either store bought or mixed your own) full of nuts and seeds and a variety of dried fruits to keep you alert, and also full. Feel a little peckish? Grab a fist full and you should be good to go for another 2 hours. I found this trick handy when I was traveling and couldn't find many places to eat at pit stops. It provided a grazing-type meal and a snack, and I found it very good at keeping me feeling full and satisfied. This should work for a busy person as well and it's not hard to keep with you. It doesn't need to be kept cold or frozen and doesn't need to be heated.<br><br>
Forgot to add: the nuts and seeds will provide a lot of protein as well as nutrition, along with the dried fruit. The fruit pieces will make it sweeter too, so you can enjoy it more. Maybe add some carob or semi-sweet vegan chocolate chips in the mix for more of a treat.
 

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Don't worry about protein. Mix up beans, nuts, whole grains and you'll be fine. Soybeans are 'complete' protein as well.<br><br>
Watched that special on the mountain gorillas recently. You want muscle, they got muscle -- from mostly green leaves.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>convert</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2920120"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
This is my concern as well. I had eaten meat for 42 years before making the decision to go vegetarian almost 7 months ago(vegan, while it appears a little healthier, was too big of a step for me) I often find myself falling off the wagon at night. Where my cravings used to center around sweets at this time, I find they are now protein"centric". I find myself eating 3/4 of a pound of sharp cheddar most nights at around 10pm! If not that, I am running to the store and getting a package of convenience store ham, which was disgusting to me in my meat-eating time, but I treat as if it were criminally delicious now. Rediculous. I will be interested to see some responses here, and hope to learn something as well.<br><br>
For the one who posted the slow-cooker comment, where could i find that info? I have several vegetarian cookbooks, but they all seem to center around pickled foods and beans!</div>
</div>
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Craving something doesn't mean your body needs it. Addicts crave what they're addicted to. There are addictive properties in meat and dairy. It just takes time.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>creep</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2927596"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Craving something doesn't mean your body needs it. Addicts crave what they're addicted to. There are addictive properties in meat and dairy. It just takes time.</div>
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I don't have a reference to quote, but I do remember reading about the effect of cheese on the human brain. Apparently, there are properties in cheese that toy around with certain pleasure centers in the same ways that heroin does.
 

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Read, or go see the documentary, Forks over Knives- particularly since you're going to med school! Docters get such limited nutritional training, and what we eat is paramount to health.<br><br>
Try tracking your diet on fitday.com or a like site where you list what you eat daily and track your nutritional content. You'll probably be surprised.<br>
I think a lot of people feel veg*n diets don't have enough protein because they don't realize we eat more of certain foods than the "serving size" they think of when searching protein content.
 

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You don't have to worry about combining amino acids and what not. That is very old and outdated advice that omnis still feel the need to cling to even though it isn't based in truth. It is actually pretty hard to not get enough protein if you are eating fruits, veggies, beans, and whole grains regularly. Kwashiorkor is almost unheard of in the U.S. so you are good there.<br>
As far as filling foods that keep you feeling full. Hmm. My favorite thing to eat is a tortilla with hummus and fresh veggies. I feel full for hours off of that. I also love garden burgers on a sandwich thin, soups and stews, anything made with quinoa (you can make a big batch and use it for days), steel cut oats, etc... In my opinon, a rice cooker and crockpot are your best friend if you don't have time to cook. These are pretty much set it and forget it appliances. I make all of my beans in the crockpot, and all of my grains in the rice cooker.
 
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