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Is splenda bad for you? What about other sugar replacements? I got this syrup that is 35 calories/serving, and it is got splenda in it. It is cool! reg. syrup is 240 cals!!
 

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I, personally, won't use Splenda. My hubby used the stuff and it caused him to have dizzy spells. Once he discontinued using the stuff, he got better. So, if I want something sweet and healthy, I use stevia - it's natural, sweet, and has nutritional benefits. It's harder to measure, but well worth learning about. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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id say its a lot better than aspartame or the pink stuff. tastes better too. im still using my 5cal a serving syrup, i dont even remember what real sugar tastes like lol.<br><br><br><br>
dizzy spells from sucralose?? i wonder why. physical intolerance? my doctor just told me she suspects i might have developed a fructose intolderance, but that doesnt mean people shouldnt eat fruit. haha. in my opinion stevia isnt any safer or better being that it's made from an herb, that doesnt mean much.
 

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I was wondering the same thing a couple of week ago, and did some searches, everything I found dealing with health and sugar substitutes had to do with aspartame. On the Splenda web-site, they talk about the safety of sucralose.<br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.splenda.com/page.jhtml?id=splenda/hcp/safety.inc" target="_blank">http://www.splenda.com/page.jhtml?id...hcp/safety.inc</a><br><br><br><br>
I gave up maple syrup long ago, due to the cost, and calories, but I miss it for these soy sausage links thingys. What is the brand of the syrup?
 

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I use Splenda - only because I have a problem with aspartame. I haven't read anything bad about it yet (yet)<br><br><br><br>
I have a bottle of Stevia that has a about a dozen drops out of it - the aftertaste I can't take.
 

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I'm allergic to aspartame (so are some other family members, looks like it's a genetic thing), so we never had it in the house at all growing up. My dad has type 2 diabetes, so he cut back on sugar and uses splenda for sweetening cereal, etc. instead of using aspartame.<br><br><br><br>
I tried stevia and hated it. There is definitely an aftertaste to it that just doesn't appeal to me at all.<br><br><br><br>
I use unrefined cane sugar, but then again I rarely use sugar to begin with, so I didn't feel a need to find a low-cal substitute.
 

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I remember reading something about health concerns regarding Splenda. I'll have to look for it.<br><br>
I don't really care for the taste of stevia, and aspartame always leaves a funny tickle in the back of my throat that makes me uncomfortable. More importantly, I wouldn't use aspartame because of all the seizures associated with it's use.<br><br>
I really don't use sweeteners, just maple syrup once in a while, but even that is said to be sometimes processed with traces of formaldehyde.<br><br>
Brown rice syrup and barley malt are suppose to good because they enter your blood stream at a slower rate than most other sugars.
 

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Grateful_Veggie writes<br><br><br><br>
"I use unrefined cane sugar"<br><br><br><br>
Statistically speaking, most people who think they are using unrefined cane sugar, are not using unrefined cane sugar. Most of the cane sugar products are marketed in ways that cause people to infer, erroneously, from the marketing verbage, that the product they are getting is unrefined, or minimally refined -- when in reality they are highly refined.<br><br><br><br>
1) I've never seen unrefied cane sugar in granular form. It may be because it is too hyrdroscopic for the grains to avoid sticking togeher and become, say, one 2 pound bag "rock candy" instead of a 2 pound bag of little tiny grains, little tiny "rock candies."<br><br><br><br>
2) Unrefined cane sugar tastes like light molasses. If it has the same sweetness as light molasses, or the same amount of sucrose per gram, but has less of a molasses taste than light molasses -- that gives you measure of just how much it was refined. The less mollassesy the taste, for the same sucrose per gram value (which you can estimate by tasting its sweetness), the more it was refined.<br><br><br><br>
3) Grandma's Light Molasses is unrefined cane sugar. It does not have a lot of water. It is cane juice that has been heated, filtered, clarified, and almost completely dehydrated. If you were to completely dehydrate it, I believe it would clump, as I mentioned above.<br><br><br><br>
Of course the only totally natural cane sugar is a piece of sugar cane. But when making light molasses, the cane is squeezed, and probably heated so more juice can be squeezed, and then the juice is dehydrated. Filtering removes particles that make it cloudy. Also secret methods of clarifying it are used, usually adding chemicals that cause particles that are too small to be trapped by a filter, to precipitate out. Then they can be left in the bottom of a container, or can be more easily filtered. but beyond that minimal degree of refining, light molasses is unrefined. Anything with less molasses taste, is refined -- it has had flavor essences and micronutrient removed. Light molasses has had an insignificant amount of flavor essences and micronutrients removed. What is removed in filtering and sedimentation processing is mostly just particles of cellulose, insect particle, dust, etcetera.
 

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Soilman is definitely correct on all counts. Unless you chew a piece of sugar cane, whatever you're using has been refined to some degree. Jaggery (brown Indian rock sugar), piloncillo (brown Mexican rock sugar) and molasses are "minimally" refined. To merely avoid the bone char filtration process most of the sugar labeled "unrefined" or "granulated cane juice" is acceptable, but from a health perspective it's all the same. All the talk of trace minerals and such is pretty much bunk. You'd have to eat so much of the sugar to reap the benefits of the tract minerals that you'd be ill.<br><br><br><br>
Maybe it's just better to accept the fact that sugar is perfectly fine in small amounts for generally healthy people. Just eat less of it and eat the real thing. This goes for most types of food, it's just better to view sweets and fats as treats to be savored occasionally, in as unadulterated a state as possible.<br><br><br><br>
Splenda blows, btw. Haven't heard too much yet about the health negatives (it took awhile for saccharine scares to surface, too). But even if it proves to be unharmful, it still leaves a distinct, artificial, back of the throat tang. Bleh!
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by soilman</i><br><br><b>Statistically speaking, most people who think they are using unrefined cane sugar, are not using unrefined cane sugar. Most of the cane sugar products are marketed in ways that cause people to infer, erroneously, from the marketing verbage, that the product they are getting is unrefined, or minimally refined -- when in reality they are highly refined.<br><br></b></div>
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That is some very interesting information - thanks!<br><br><br><br>
I use Rapadura sugar, whatever that is. It's dark colored, and isn't really crystalline like white sugar. It does taste a lot like molasses. I find I need to use a bit less of it to get a good level of sweetness, which is a big reason why I use it.<br><br><br><br>
The only other sweeteners I use are molasses and maple syrup.
 

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Does anybody find that with Splenda or Natrataste, there is a rise in appetite post-consumption? I always feel hungry if I put Natrataste in my tea...
 

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What about honey? Unpasturized honey is the best sweetner - really good in stir fry's (just a little), tea, cakes .... I have no idea about the caloric intake though ..
 

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Metabolically and nutritionally honey is the same as standard, refined white sugar. It can also be toxic to the very young, the very old and those with compromised immune systems. Also, it isn't vegan and may pose a moral/ethical problem to those who wish to sweeten their food or beverages without engaging in or supporting animal exploitation and suffering.<br><br><br><br>
There's a myth surrounding honey that it is some sort of health food. Most likely because it is one of western civilization's first sweetners; you can gain a lot of crediblity simply by existing for a long time (Christianity for example). But, it's bunk though.
 

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I'm not too sure that Christianity's credibility exists due to it's longevity. If that were the case, people would be driving around with 'Zeus Saves' on the back of their cars.<br><br><br><br>
Anyway.<br><br><br><br>
I like stevia, but when I've managed to find it, the price has been so astronomical that there's no way I could justify purchasing it. Splenda is alright, but I tend to use more than I want of it.
 

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You know what? I really like blackstrap molasses. I put some in my green tea - very little. I also really like 100% pure maple sugar. I sometimes use barley malt, too. I like the flavors that these more natural sweeteners give the food. When I DO need sugar, I used the least refined I can find. I also bought a bag of Sucanat, but I really don't know what that is.<br><br><br><br>
To me, nothing beats pure maple syrup. You only have to use a tiny amount and you get such a wonderful sweet taste.<br><br><br><br>
I can't stand nutrasweet - it makes me tired and toxic, and I have tried and tried to like Stevia, but no can do...it tastes awful to me.<br><br><br><br>
I was always like this even before I swore off dairy. I like the natural taste of full fat, or partial fat products, and wouldn't consume "fat free' anything unless it is naturally fat free. IMHO, I'd rather eat a little of something wonderful than a bunch of something processed and yucky.<br><br><br><br>
Does anyone else out there use blackstrap molasses, barley malt, and real maple syrup for sweetness and flavor?
 

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Barley malt has a mild flavor, but blackstrap molassess, especially, has a strong flavor. it complements some other flavors, and conflicts with others. Maple syrup -- same idea. White sugar doesn't conflict with any other flavors, which explains why it is popular.<br><br><br><br>
Of course blackstrap molasses is even stronger in flavor than unrefined sugar. It is dehydrated cane juice that has had much of the sugar taken <b>out</b> of it. It's basicaly what's left over when they make all the refined sweeteners -- it has all the micronutrients and flavors they <b>take out</b>. That makes it a good source of micronutrients -- but it not a whole food, it has sulfur residues used in the sugar refining process, and the flavor overpowers everything. Most people who use it in recipes use some blackstrap, and some refined sugar -- to approximate light molasses -- I think it would be simpler to just use light molasses to begin with.
 

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I use maple syrup in my oatmeal - they flavors complement each other, and in my oatmeal cookies. But I wouldn't try to make a rasberry smoothie flavored with maple syrup instead of sugar, or dates -- the flavor would conflict with the rasberry flavor.<br><br><br><br>
Yes, <b>dates</b> work very well where other sweeteners would be too strong-tasting. I use dates (blended with water) in my almond-cream or other nut-cream toppings for fruit salad. It is hard to find "date sugar" -- basically just pulverized date powder -- but I would use it a lot if I could find it.
 
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