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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just went to a supermarket in the Spanish area near me. Which by the way is a conglamoration of lots of different Spanish ethnicities and lots of skin colors. One thing I noticed is that white people, tan people, brown people and black people all live in the same neigborhoods there, even live with each other -- not like in Anglo-America.

The other thing I noticed is that for the size of the supermarket, it had twice as big a produce department as the produce department of supermarkets in the Anglo section of town. It lots of those root vegetables that are popular in Spanish-America, but also twice as many of the same fruits and vegetables that are popular in Anglo markets -- more kinds of apples and twice as many of each kind apples. Big trays of apples spreading out twice as far in evey direction as the trays of apples in Anglo stores. Twice as many grapefruits. The same kind -- just a bigger pile of them. Fresher. And cheper. And another thing I noticed is that they cut open a few sample sweet potatoes, as well as the Spanish root vegetables, for their display, so you can see what the inside (the part you eat) looks like. I found that made me feel like I wanted to buy sweet potatoes - not to mention all the other root vegetables. I wonder why they don't do that in anglo markets? They cut open a few watermelons in Anglo markets -- that is the only thing I can think of that they cut open to show you the inside of, in Anglo markets.

Also, the fresh fish section was about 10 times as big as the fish section in Anglo markets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
What I mean by Spanish-America is an abbreviation for Spanish-speaking America. Latino is Spanish for Spanish, French, and Italian. All (2) of my "Latin-American" friends call themselves "Spanish."

I like to call people what they call themselves. The one from Panama says "let's go to a Spanish retaurant," or "I got that at a Spanish grocery store," meaning Cuban, Puerto Rican, or whatever he happens to be talking about. The one from Puerto Rico uses the same terminology.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Anglo is Spanish and Spanglish for English, British, Australian, English-speaking Canadian -- for anyone whose primary language is English, or for any thing that comes from the culture of such English-speaking people.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Buenosayres writes: "Some people just don't know the difference between Spanish and Latino."

They know the difference. the Panamanian is acutely aware of being Panamanian. The Puerto Rican is very Puertoricanos or whatever the word is. They are 1. rebelling against being politically correct. 2. Recognizing that while in their native lands each nationality was distinct, once in the US, they want to hang together, as there is power in hanging together. Esp the Panamanian man -- there just aren't a lot of Panamanians in his neigborhood. He makes a point of frequenting other "Spanish" businesses, esp in re to food, going to the cuban take-out place and the Puerto-Rican take-out place, and discussing what he bought, and what else they had available.

I spent a few weeks as a temp, working in the accounting department of Jewish owned wholesale auto parts co, where every single person in the accounting department and purchasing dept, except me, was "Spanish." That was the term the ALL used. All 15 or so of them. They all seemed to have a highly formed sense of "Spanish" pride and interest in things from the Spanish world in general, making a point of being interested in Spanish things from Spanish places other than their own -- despite the fact that 9/10 of them spoke English without an accent and were highly acculturated to the Anglo world, and able to pass for Anglo if they wanted to. This was NOT a place where the Spanish-speaking didn't learn English. They even made good-natured fun of those few who still spoke English with an accent, mimicing their accents.

I heard the word "Spanish" being used for everything Latin-American. Over and over. I don't think I heard the word "Latin" or Latino or Hispanic EVER being used, the whole time I was there. This is from the Colombian coffee beans which were "Spanish" coffee beans to the Cuban take-out place and the Chinese-Spanish take-out place. Yes, that is what the sign on the Chinese take-out place says "Chinese and Spanish Food." The Chinese take-out places in Anglo parts of town often say "Chinese and American Food"
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
By the way, isn't the word "Hispanic" simply the Spanish word for the English word "Spanish"? Why use the Spanish word when speaking English? And isn't the word "Latino" or "Latina" simply the Spanish word for the English word Latin?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
"The implication is that their culture then, is "Spanish", when in fact, it was only influenced (to varying degrees) by Spanish invaders. It's a matter of pride."

I am sure they are quite aware that their culture is not purely Spanish and that it is a mixture of Spanish and whatever was there before the invasion. They are using the word Spanish as an abbreviation for "Spanish-invaded." Or perhaps Spanish-flavored. Sabor! That is exactly what they all have in common, and perhaps in some cases the only things that they have in common -- that they were subject to a Spanish invasion, both cultural and genetic, and became "Spanish-flavored." They were obviously acutely aware that some of them are Cuban and others Puerto Rican. I am pretty sure that part of using the word Spanish is to show rejection for political correctness, and part is to show solidarity -- KNOWING that invasion is the main thing they have in common, but implying that in the US, it is beneficial to FIND things in common. I only occasionally heard the word "spic" and never the n-word, among the white and brown and black Spanish-derived people, in contrast to (some) of my Anglo-black and Anglo-brown acquaintences who use the n-word over and over. I heard a lot comparisons to "Juan Valdez" when accents were being made fun of.

By the way, I am pretty sure that when I referred to stuff as "Latin" or Latin-American in my relatively precise way of doing things, my imprecise panamanian acquaintence gently guided the conversation back toward the use of the word Spanish instead of Latin, repeating his oft-repeated hint that perhaps precision was for Germans and Anglos, and that the Spanish had a cultural trait of being generally content with "close-enough" but of being as precise as anyone -- when precision was NECESSARY.
 
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