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for some reason I find soybeans very difficult to find at the grocery store! Kroger carries them in the frozen health food section. Don't places sell fresh soybeans in the produce section?? Anyway I like snacking on them, out of the pod, plain and not cooked. Any other ideas on how to use them?
 

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Depends on where you live I guess. In Hawaii you can find them in the produce section. In Japan too (in Japan you can find soybeans in almost every conceivable form.....except, at lease in my experience....not tempeh - or maybe I'm just going to the wrong stores).<br><br><br><br>
I like them lightly steamed then salted as well.
 

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Have you tried the frozen section? I have found them fresh-frozen in bags and they are usually labeled as "edamame" which is the Japanese name for them.<br><br><br><br>
They make a great addition to bean salads!
 

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mmmmmm i love edamame - served salted and steamed fresh from the pod!<br><br>
they are a very common sight in the bars in japan, isn't that right dvmarie?
 

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I'm shocked!! - I NEVER go to bars!!!........<br><br><br><br>
(unless I have at least 5,000 yen in my pocket) <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/naughty.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":naughty:">
 

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here in florida we eat boiled peanuts, so i bet steamed edamame would be yum.<br><br><br><br>
any special ways to steam them?
 

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Edamame does not seem to be available in any story near where I live, except in the form of frozen very poor quality Chinese-grown beans, in or out of pods, many of them even starting to rot <b>before</b> being frozen (I can tell by the smell of the rot), and also kept frozen so long that they have ghastly freezer burn and horrendous off-flavors. That is why I have grown edamame myself for many years. And frozen amounts that I didn't eat right away.<br><br><br><br>
I want to go commercial.
 

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"Steam 'em like you would any veggie."<br><br><br><br>
I would not steam them the same way I would steam "any" other vegetable. Then need to be steamed, in the pod, for only about 4 minutes. I recommend dumping them in cold water as soon as the 4 minutes are up, to prevent over-cooking, as of course they will continue to cook for another 30 seconds or so (depending upon how large a pile of beans you have, the material and the size and shape of container they go into, etcetera) after you simply drain out the steaming-water.<br><br><br><br>
Also, with most vegetables, steaming them involves saving the water you steam them in, to use in various food items. You must <b>not</b> save or consume the water that unshelled edamame was steamed in. Therefore you can not steam them mixed with other vegetables. You must steam them separately, and then discard the water. It has way too much tannic acid or something to be palatable.
 

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Edamame is <b>not</b> the Japanese name for soybeans; it is the japanese name for cultivars of soybeans intended for use as a succulent (as opposed to a a naturally dehydrated) bean, and marketed not only in the pod, but still attached to the stems of the soybean plant. From what I understand, edamame means, sort of, "immature beans still on the plant, and brought to you by pulling or cutting the plant and bringing that to you."<br><br><br><br>
They probably tend to be fresher if they are still on the plant, when you get them, much the way animals tend to be fresher if they are still alive and in one piece when you get them.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by soilman</i><br><br><b>"Steam 'em like you would any veggie."<br><br><br><br>
I would not steam them the same way I would steam "any" other vegetable. Then need to be steamed, in the pod, for only about 4 minutes. I recommend dumping them in cold water as soon as the 4 minutes are up, to prevent over-cooking, as of course they will continue to cook for another 30 seconds or so (depending upon how large a pile of beans you have, the material and the size and shape of container they go into, etcetera) after you simply drain out the steaming-water.<br><br><br><br>
Also, with most vegetables, steaming them involves saving the water you steam them in, to use in various food items. You must not save or consume the water that unshelled edamame was steamed in. Therefore you can not steam them mixed with other vegetables. You must steam them separately, and then discard the water. It has way too much tannic acid or something to be palatable.</b></div>
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Okay, I never do it this way, nor do I ever save the water I've steamed veggies in, but if it works for soilman, it will probably work for you, too.<br><br><br><br>
I steam the edamame and eat them right away. I don't like cooling them, because I enjoy them best hot. Another alternative is to microwave them, but I know some people here don't like microwaves, so take yer pick.
 

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"nor do I ever save the water I've steamed veggies in"<br><br><br><br>
The water that you steam vegetables in generally contains more of many the micronutrients that were originally in the uncooked vegetables, than remain in the vegetables. You are throwing away nutrients if you discard the water.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by soilman</i><br><br><b>Edamame is not the Japanese name for soybeans;</b></div>
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<br><br><br><a href="http://www.evergreenseeds.com/evergreenseeds/edsoyed.html" target="_blank">http://www.evergreenseeds.com/evergr...s/edsoyed.html</a>
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by soilman</i><br><br><b>"nor do I ever save the water I've steamed veggies in"<br><br><br><br>
The water that you steam vegetables in generally contains more of many the micronutrients that were originally in the uncooked vegetables, than remain in the vegetables. You are throwing away nutrients if you discard the water.</b></div>
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*shrugs*<br><br><br><br>
So, conceivably (assuming microwaving veggies doesn't totally destroy their nutritional value and raise white blood cell count in people) nuking veggies in their own juices, plus maybe a little water, would retain all those nutrients you speak of?<br><br><br><br>
If not, I could certainly see the benefit of pouring some of the juicy water back over the steamed veggies just before serving. Steamed veggies au jus!
 
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