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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is it possible to be vegetarian and not use too very many soy based products? I'm not completely comfortable (given some research that I've done) with eating large quantities of soy (mainly the excessive estrogens).<br><br><br><br>
Anyway, I'm on a journey toward vegetarianism <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> and I wondered if it was possible without a high dependency on soy products.<br><br><br><br>
My kids (5 and 3) have never been huge meat fans, so for them this'll be easy. DH will definitely not get on board anytime soon, so he's the only one I'll have to cater to, which is definitely easier I think -- (easier than the kids, I mean, given I eat ALL my meals with my kids, but not with DH <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> )<br><br><br><br>
Anyway, thank you for any responses!!<br><br>
Pinky in Texas
 

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We use a lot of soy, but we're not trying to avoid it. However, there are also rice based cheeses and milks if you want to avoid dairy and yet also avoid soy in that area.
 

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It is certainly possible - I was vegetarian for a number of years without using soy products.<br><br><br><br>
Rice milk is an alternative to soy milk, and you can also get rice- and almond-based cheese substitutes if you like. Soy shows up in many meat substitutes, but there are also wheat-based ones, such as seitan, and quorn, and also products derived from other beans and vegetables.<br><br><br><br>
More importantly, I think a lot of people introduce soy products into their diet when they go veg because of a perception that they are needed to "replace" meat and dairy. But that's not so. You can have a tasty, varied, and healthy diet using grains, vegetables, and non-soy legumes. (Pasta dishes, bean burritos, stir-fried veggies and rice, falafel, hummus, etc. etc.)<br><br><br><br>
I'd also not get too paranoid over the phytoestrogen thing. Nutrition specialists generally do not seem to think this is a problem. A diet that contains moderate soy along with other types of legumes should be just fine.
 

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You can eat a varied vegetarian diet and not use soy products at all if you want! It seems to be mainly found in the 'fake meats' and processed stuff (apart from tofu and soy milk) which some people don't bother with at all or only eat occasionally, but even then there are non-soy veggie burgers, members in the US can advise you on brands if you're interested in including these in your diet. Good luck with the journey <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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It's definitely not a must/necessity. You can get your nutrients from lots of other foods. It -can- help people out when they are first transitioning to a veg*n diet, though. I was very happy to have quite a few products around when I was first starting out. I don't eat much of it now, if at all.
 

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it seems to make the transition easier.<br><br><br><br>
I went from a large portion of my diet being soy based "meat and dairy alternatives" when I first went vegetarian and vegan to now hardly any soy at all.<br><br><br><br>
I drink hazelnut milk or put it on cereal(blows soymilk out of the water IMO) - and use nutritional yeast when i have a hankerin for a cheesy flavor. I use olive oil in place of butter/margarine.<br><br>
The only soy products I really use any more are yogurt (maybe once a week on average) soy delicious (a pint a month on average) chick'n strips (few times a month average) veggie crumbles (once a week average) and tofu (few times a month). There are many many days where I don't have soy at all.<br><br><br><br>
Too often, people think that vegetarian means "soyatarian". It doesn't.
 

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Short answer: no. Longer answer: nope.
 

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Best to eat a wide variety of foods anyway. Soy can be a healthy part of a balanced veg*n diet, but should not be to sole or major source of protein or other nutrients.
 

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<span style="color:#008000;">Another "no" post. Tofu is good once you learn to cook with it. I enjoy making "tacos" with Boca or Morningstar Farms' crumbles too.<br><br><br><br>
In general, I'd rather have broccoli, though. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"></span>
 

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It's definitely possible.<br><br>
Like others have said, I found that the longer I had been vegetarian the less I relied on fake-meat products. I still use soy margarine a lot of days (it happens to be the tastiest & cheapest vegan margarine in the place where I shop, but there are at least two other vegan margarines with no soy), soy milk on cereal & occasionally in coffee (I go through a carton of soymilk every two weeks or so) but there are rice milk, almond milk, hazlenut milk and oat milk too and if you are still using cows' milk and butter these things wont be an issue anyway. I use tofu and tvp quite often (~once every two weeks) but beans, seitan, quorn, etc are available instead, and meals don't have to include a meat substitute at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thank you all for your informative responses!! I'm happy to know that a reliance on soy isn't a veg must!<br><br><br><br>
I didn't think about all the beans and things being a sufficient protein replacement, and I LOVE rice milk and hazelnut milk anyway (DS had a milk intolerance when he was younger so we've already explored the world of dairy alternatives).<br><br><br><br>
thanks for your wisdom! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/thumbsup.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":up:"><br><br>
Pinky in Texas
 
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