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Have you tried dips? Like hummus? Might make things more fun and add some flavor to the mix <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br>
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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>alis</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3080121"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Wow, thanks for all the great advice <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> I am going to try a bit of margarine/salt. I started off with no-salt for the beginning of his weaning at 6 months and I guess need to 'upgrade' to more seasonings (he will eat curries etc, but I just never bothered to add salts). I can appreciate all perspectives, but I do come from a very "attachment parenting" perspective and letting him go hungry is not an option for me at this time (he will just nurse more anyways, I'm sure). Thank you everyone <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"></div>
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You could even try roasting veggies for him with some olive oil and a little sea salt. Roasted veggies are the best <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/drool.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":drool:">
 

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Look up the phases of childhood development. He is testing his boundaries, learning to say yes and no, and also separating himself from his parents and developing his identity and "self-ness".n It is highly important that you do not punish him for testing boundaries and trying to develop into a singular person. (You can think about how this may damage him, if someone is always barking down his throat for being himself). You're in the prelude to the terrible twos, or his toddler years. It is common for children in the toddler stage have many peculiarities with eating and food. Sometimes they only want to eat one thing. They can also find vegetables bitter. A few missed meals are not harmful, but it is better to avoid it. If he hates the veggies, try fruit.<br><br>
It is best to keep emotion out of food. This is how eating problems develop.<br><br>
Look into child development texts and websites, you will find out that food pickyness is very common to children this age. Do not get nervous, or freak out. Children are intelligent. They are learning and growing at an amazing rate.<br><br>
I've found that if you take them to petting zoos where vegetable eating creatures (i.e. role models) can be seen close up (baby goats, rabbits) they may be inclined to "pretend" they are baby goats, rabbits etc and accept more veggies. This could be a fun game. Also next spring try to grow something in a planter or in a garden (if you have access) so they will learn more about vegetables. Go to You-Pick-its and pick fresh vegetables to take home. In my area spring is a good time for foraging for wild asparagus. This can be a fun family trip. Children who grow up close to the earth often have more of a taste for vegetables.
 

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I was curious what you had already given re: non-breastmilk - like rice cereal? etc. even if he doesn't eat veggies, try to include some fruits (you said peppers and zucchini, which is good, but try sweet fruits, too). you can mix green leafy veggies with a sweet fruit smoothie without a problem and without adding salt to it. :/ I'd go easy on the salt, in any case. you don't want a salt and sugar addict on your hands......esp. at this young age.<br><br>
if you eat a high-salt diet, i wonder if there's a lot of sodium in your breastmilk (?), so maybe cut back as well.<br><br>
fruits & veggies, if fresh, should be palatable without salt, in any case. do you have a farmer's market or can you get in-season items?
 

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Don't listen to Heather. If a fussy child actually likes bell peppers, it can only be a good thing. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":p">
 

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I would recommend reading Disease Proof Your Child: Feeding Kids Right by Joel Fuhrman, MD. Although our son has been a vegetarian since birth and is 36 now, I still wish I would have had this book when he was a child. I wish MY parents had had it.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>danakscully64</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3079657"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I disagree, he's only 19 months, he's way too young to do that.</div>
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i disagree. children dont starve themselves. they are not cognitively capable of it like adults are. children, like adults have preferences and parents can pick up on these (my son hates cucumbers--no big deal he doesnt have to have them) but parents need only to prepare healthy varied options. if the kid is hungry he/she will eat. it is very simple yet parents make food a painful struggle that i will never get<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/sad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":("> jmo
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Thanks all. I will check out that book, lots of great reviews. I love reading about child nutrition. We actually live in the bitter north Canada and I am trying to stick to the local stuff as imported products are extremely $ right now (it's about -25c/-13F today). I think my profile defaults to the US<br><br>
I was also reading Harvey Karp's Happiest Toddler on the Block (again from an attachment parenting/evolutionary perspective) and he talks about how, at around these years, children can become very picky about particular colours (ie. attracted to red but not green, what is edible in the wild and what is not, or what is sweet and what is not). Red bell peppers and red tomatoes are his absolute favourite, aways have been.<br><br>
Last night I made a nicely spiced and salted biryani with lots of veggies and he devoured it, so I suspect the problem was simply that the food was becoming a bit too bland for him (I never started with purees, only real table food, but never with added salt).<br><br>
Of course, his favourite food has always been and probably always will be...<br><br><a href="http://www.veggieboards.com/newvb/attachment.php?s=4f00d9a09ae2d47e7897a8b698cefdb9&attachmentid=17573" title="">Attachment 17573</a><br><a href="http://cdn.veggieboards.com/5/5b/5b39b5d0_vbattach17573.jpeg"><img alt="LL" src="http://cdn.veggieboards.com/5/5b/525x525px-LL-5b39b5d0_vbattach17573.jpeg" style="width:222px;height:405px;"></a>
 

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Im glad things are working better for you...its all about trial and error with food.<br><br><br>
and I just need to say...Why the heck does EVERYTHING have to turn into an arguement on these boards.<br>
OP wasnt asking for advice on how to raise her kid, simply asking for suggestions on how to make food more appealing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Thanks! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br>
I guess that is very typical of most parenting discussions. I never mentioned it in my OP but aside from my own AP philosophy, my son had a severe form of acid reflux disease from birth to about 15 months (several emergency room visits included), and dealing with food "aversion" (food=pain association) has been most of the last year for me, so the last thing I should do is try and withhold food from him. He didn't even swallow solids until 12 months due to this aversion so I think we're doing pretty good.
 

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I'm glad you're finding ways of getting your son to eat! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/thumbsup.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":up:"><br><br>
Btw, you can change your location if you want. Just click on settings and then on edit profile, and then scroll down to where it says location, and you can choose from a drop down menu.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>alis</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3081683"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Thanks! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br>
I guess that is very typical of most parenting discussions. I never mentioned it in my OP but aside from my own AP philosophy, my son had a severe form of acid reflux disease from birth to about 15 months (several emergency room visits included), and dealing with food "aversion" (food=pain association) has been most of the last year for me, so the last thing I should do is try and withhold food from him. He didn't even swallow solids until 12 months due to this aversion so I think we're doing pretty good.</div>
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Hello!<br>
Same boat!<br>
My son has severe reflux- he actually needs to be medicated 2x a day for currently. Before we ended up medicating him, was diagnosed FTT at 2 and would frequently starve himself. I would offer a varied amount of food all day, and he would refuse it, going days without eating, only drinking milk. We got him on Prevacid and it took a matter of weeks, he began picking at his food. Once we upped his dosage about a month or so ago, he began to tolerate more food- and now will taste some fruits and veggies, and new things. He is almost three and has gained 8 lbs since he was 2.<br><br>
I will say that a child can absolutely starve them selves! My son is living proof. In this case it wasn't a behavioral issue- he was just in so much pain! My poor baby. I wish we had medicated him much sooner. He even has erosion on his teeth - on the back side from acid. If I only knew, I would get so frustrated and treat it like a behavioral issue, it was never the case. I suggest looking into it further with his pediatrician, and giving it time. An occupational therapist has worked wonders for him as well, getting him to not fear food as much anymore. It is understandable why reflux causes an aversion, especially when many fruits and veggies are acidic, and the leafy greens can be so tough on the belly. You can try recipes that neutralize them, and cook them down to avoid acidity.<br>
My advice is really to keep offering, and don't get discouraged- definitely look into it though and get help!
 
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