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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So here's the short story - I have a client whose website was hosted by Yahoo for years. They made a switch to another host, had their A and MX records pointed to the new host, and then made an MX record entry back to Yahoo (they wanted to stick with Yahoo's mail servers, god knows why) that is given first priority over the new hosts mail server. This setup has been working fine for almost two years.

Yahoo recently "upgraded" their admin interface, and since that time, I've been unable to properly create pop-only email accounts. They get created, but never properly "activated". They'll work, but they perpetually have a pending confirmation status, and I cannot edit the password, only delete them.

Yahoo claims that this setup a) cannot work, and therefore b) they cannot help me in activating pop-only accounts. I would need to repoint my DNS record to them. They also claim not to have any 'static email records'.

I've argued this with them for hours, had it escalated to a supervisor, etc. to no avail.

If there's someone here that's fluent in e-mail and DNS records, I'd love to chat with you. Please PM for phone or Skype info.
 

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What do you mean by "pop-only." Pop and no smtp? Pop and smtp but no imap? Pop and smtp but no web mail? Pop and smtp and web mail but no sendmail, pine mail, etcetera?

I am not an expert in pop servers and don't even know what MX and A are. But the admin interface for my web site doesn't have any configuration options for web mail that are separate from the general email address setup configuration, either. You choose account names, then maximum disk space for each acct name, if you want to. Then you can do forwarding, and auto-responders, and things. Once you've set up the email accounts, then you can access your accounts by pop-smtp, and also horde web mail or squirrel web mail, or unix sendmail or whatever, or even by imap. But you cannot have web-only access or pop-smtp-only access. If you set up pop-smtp, you automatically have web. If you don't want to use web access, you just don't give the user the "http://address" to use, to reach their mail account via the web.

As far as "MX" goes, I don't know what it is, but the admin page for my web site says "Warning: Changing your MX to something besides mail.shakahara.com will prevent us from managing your mail. Your email will no longer be sent to this server." So I don't know what it is even there for. Makes no sense to me.

Who recently upgraded their admin interface, yahoo, or the new web hosting company?

If your client has their web site on a new web server, at a new hosting company, and they have their email at yahoo, why can't you just use yahoo to set up pop and smtp servers for receiving and sending email? Why do you have to involve the new host at all? Or do you want to use the new url, but access the yahoo pop server? If that is the case, isn't there some simple forwarding scheme you can use, without involving dns and MX?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
hi soilman, thanks for the reply.

Quote:
Originally Posted by soilman View Post

What do you mean by "pop-only." Pop and no smtp? Pop and smtp but no imap? Pop and smtp but no web mail? Pop and smtp and web mail but no sendmail, pine mail, etcetera?
Yahoo offers Web+POP or POP-only (No Web) email options.

Quote:
Originally Posted by soilman View Post

I am not an expert in pop servers and don't even know what MX and A are. But the admin interface for my web site doesn't have any configuration options for web mail that are separate from the general email address setup configuration, either. You choose account names, then maximum disk space for each acct name, if you want to. Then you can do forwarding, and auto-responders, and things. Once you've set up the email accounts, then you can access your accounts by pop-smtp, and also horde web mail or squirrel web mail, or unix sendmail or whatever, or even by imap. But you cannot have web-only access or pop-smtp-only access. If you set up pop-smtp, you automatically have web. If you don't want to use web access, you just don't give the user the "http://address" to use, to reach their mail account via the web.
Yours may be different than mine. I know they've offered several different hosting options. Complicating matters more, the hosting options have changed with some options being grandfathered in, while others were deleted.

Quote:
Originally Posted by soilman View Post

As far as "MX" goes, I don't know what it is, but the admin page for my web site says "Warning: Changing your MX to something besides mail.shakahara.com will prevent us from managing your mail. Your email will no longer be sent to this server." So I don't know what it is even there for. Makes no sense to me.
It's nothing more than a disclaimer, imo. You can select a different mail provider and have all mail directed to them, but they will then refuse all support with e-mail. That makes sense. We're doing something related -- Our DNS info is with a different provider, and we point our mail record back to Yahoo.

Quote:
Originally Posted by soilman View Post

Who recently upgraded their admin interface, yahoo, or the new web hosting company?
Yahoo. In particular, the e-mail portion is completely different on our end.

Quote:
Originally Posted by soilman View Post

If your client has their web site on a new web server, at a new hosting company, and they have their email at yahoo, why can't you just use yahoo to set up pop and smtp servers for receiving and sending email? Why do you have to involve the new host at all? Or do you want to use the new url, but access the yahoo pop server? If that is the case, isn't there some simple forwarding scheme you can use, without involving dns and MX?
That's what we do. We use Yahoo as the POP (and until recently) SMTP servers (SMTP -- that's a whole nother story..)

The new host is involved with e-mail only as the Nameserver pointing the MX (Mail Exchange) record to Yahoo. In other words, when you send an e-mail, your mail server looks up the MX record via DNS. Then it trys to deliver to that address.

Thanks for your thoughts, appreciate it.

We've decided to run our own mail server, and pull the plug on Yahoo. It's simply not worth the grief. The kicker - i spoke to another Yahoo tech last evening, and discovered how they could easily have resolved at least part of the situation if they had wanted to. Instead, they lose several clients immediately, and anyone else that will listen down the road.
 

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I've been trying to learn what MX records are, by reading this and i'm confused.

For example they say

Quote:
MX (Mail Exchange) records are used to have mail delivered to users on your domain. It MUST have an MX record (not just an A record), primarily because people typically use an E-mail address with your domain name ("[email protected]"), not a subdomain ("[email protected]").
Huh? What is it that "must have an MX record," mail, or your domain? Why does the fact that email address typically have a domain name as opposed to a subdomain name, cause an "it" whatever it is, to to require an MX record? There is no explanation.

"The MX record is a domain name, so the SMTP server then gets the A record for that domain name, and connects to the mail server."

Now they throw in an "A record" without any explanation of what that is, or what connecting to the mail server has to do with A records or MX records. This just doesn't make any sense.

Quote:
Each MX record has 2 pieces of information associated with it. The first is a number ("Preference" number), the second is the domain name of the mail server.
I thought the MX record was a domain name, such as example.com? Now it is saying an MX record is something else. There is no number in "example.com"

It seems to me someone just programmed their computer to make sentences out of randomly selected nouns, verbs, and modifiers.
 
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