VeggieBoards banner

1 - 20 of 59 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,081 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
An oft-told family story: When I was four years old we were driving through the farm-dotted Ohio countryside. I piped up with: "I know why the baby cows look so sad." "Why's that, honey?" asked my parents. "Because they know they're going to be made into hamburger when they grow up."<br><br><br><br>
Despite this early epiphany -- obviously showing that meat-eating had created a conflict in my young soul -- I continued to go along with omni society for years and years. That's so strange! I did go veg from ages 10-11, but eventually caved in to adults' pressure and "health concerns." And then I became a huge carnivore until my late twenties, despite the fact that I <i>knew</i> that I would not be able to eat meat if I allowed myself to think about where it came from. I had one veg friend and hated to eat at her house (that's so awful!). I looked back at my vegetarianism as a "phase."<br><br><br><br><b>Boy, I am so glad that I'm back in harmony with what I felt at the age of four!!!</b><br><br><br><br>
I'd love to hear from everyone about their own signs that they should be veg*n, whether it happened the day they quit meat or 25 years before .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,472 Posts
I grew up in (and still live) in NH. well most young boys were fascinated by guns and they all had bb guns. I was about 14 when i wanted one i begged my mom but she refused to allow me to buy one, eventually she caved in. when i had my new gun i would shoot targets i set up like cans, etc. but my friends told me they liked to hunt small animals with their guns, well we had a lot of chipmunks running around our yard and my parents weren't home so i decided to try and hunt one. well i caught up with it and shoot it and saw the animal try to run away with a bruised hip and i eventually took another shoot and watched it quiver until it died. I felt like the worst human being on earth and i can not imagine how people kill deer so often and get excited about. I put my gun away and haven't shot at an animal since and have only shot a bb gun 2 or 3 times since and i absolutely hate it now and understand why my mom wouldnt let me have one in the first place. it took me another 5 years to go vegan and that day of savageness still haunts me
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Remember that scene in the animated Alice in Wonderland where they eat the clams? I sobbed everytime I saw that scene as a very young girl. Earliest sign of veg*nism?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,785 Posts
My story is similar to yours sunnyk. When I was little I would look out of the car window and when I saw cows I would always ask my mother, "Are those milk cows or beef cows?" If she said that they were beef cows, I always felt sad. (I thought milk cows got to live forever.)<br><br>
Then when I was a teenager, I witnessed the killing of 2 young pigs. They were killed by putting a knife inside their throats, so that no marks would show and they would be perfect little suckling pigs. It was horrific and I vowed to become a veg that day...<br><br>
Unfortunately, it took me another 13 years to actually become a vegetarian. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/sad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":(">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,339 Posts
You know in C.S. Lewis' <i>The Last Battle</i> (the 7th of the Chronicles of Narnia) when they eat the talking beast mistakenly? I was terrified that my meat might be talking beast (I had a pretty overactive imagination) and picked around my meat for a while without my parents noticing. My dad read us that book when I was 3 or so, so I suppose that was the earliest sign of what was to come.<br><br><br><br>
Mskedi
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,339 Posts
Ooh.. and I forgot all about the recurring fish stick nightmare. I actually did cut out fish when I was very young because of that one...<br><br><br><br>
Mskedi
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
828 Posts
There was not one reason I became veg, but before I did, I went on a one month trial as a vegetarian, just to see what it was really like. It wasn't hard at all, but the day the month was over I went to Burger King and ate a whopper and felt like I'd just eaten a pail of rocks. Then I wondered why in the world I wanted to eat a dead cow anyway. Shortly after this I became vegetarian permanently.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,606 Posts
I was actually talking about this last night. Odd. When I was a wee tyke going to Fourth of July fireworks, I got very teary-eyed because I thought the birds in the air would be scared of all the noise. I decided to boycott the festivities in subsequent years. First expression of true veganism, definetely.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
811 Posts
I would have never imagined I would become vegetarian, let alone Vegan. I am kind of Like Paul (Saul) on the road to Damascas to kill all of the Christians until he is struck blind by a vision of Jesus. Of course, when he finally regains his sight, he becomes the greatest spreader of the Good News ever.<br><br><br><br>
BTW - I'm not a believer in religion - I just have thoroughly read the Bible and like a lot of the implications of the stories.<br><br><br><br>
So... I grew up on a farm where my stepdad was a polo player. He always had tons of animals: 25 horses, 15 or 20 dogs (he didn't believe in having them spayed, so there were always tons of puppies and young dogs around), pigs that we would raise for pork, cattle that we would raise for beef, a chicken here or there, etc.<br><br><br><br>
The problem was, he didn't take good care of his animals. I was only 10, but was the main caretaker. I would beg him to take them to the vet, but he wouldn't do it until it was too later. There are all sorts of tragic stories of those years....far too many to write.<br><br><br><br>
I decided at a young age that I wanted to be a veterinarian. We lived in Ithaca, NY, so I went to Cornell to get an Animal Science degree and to go to vet school. In the meantime, I played polo for Cornell, and ended up the captain of our national championship team in 1984. Along with playing polo, I, unfortunately, had to study too (damn it). There were 3 defining incidents:<br><br><br><br>
1) I worked for one of the most prominant vets of Cornell after he retired. I went to VT. and worked with him that summer, as he had a large animal (predominately horse) practice. Practicing veterinary medicine is not what I had imagined when reading James Harriot. We dehorned cattle, we "neutered" pigs, we inseminated and pregnancy checked cows, and, mostly we performed "caslicks" operations on mares (where you sew up the vulva to ensure pregnancy). All of this left a bad taste in my mouth - so much of it is done with no concern for the animals perceptions and feelings. I began to question my desire to be a vet.<br><br><br><br>
2) I worked for the Cornell Dairy Teaching and Research center as a cow milker for a summer. It was SO disgusting. We would milk 475 cows in 4 hours, and I can't begin to tell you how awful it was. I almost quit consuming dairy products there and then, but I loved milk and cheese, and decided that was the way that it was.<br><br><br><br>
3) In one of my upper level physiology courses, we had to do an animal experiment where we would put a caratid canula into a rabbit and hook it up to some EKG machines and such. Of course, this meant killing the rabbits after we were done. I was very traumatized by this. One time, we couldn't get an ear vein. The poor rabbit was in the stocks, and we were poking around it's ears until they were just a mass of hematomas. Finally, the professor came in and put the rabbit under. As it went under it SCREAMED. I lost it. I could barely finish that lab, and, thank god, I was gone at an away polo match on the day that we were supposed to repeat the experiment in front of the class. I gave up vet school then and there, and took a minor in International Development in Animal Science.<br><br><br><br>
After college I became a professional horse trainer/ seller, and a professional polo player, and exploited animals non-stop. I finally burned out and quit.<br><br><br><br>
I then got into the Conversations With God series and started to see us all as one - including the life on earth around me. I joined Amnesty International and started reading up on exploitation and torture. During this past war, I was reading about Sadam Husseins brutality towards people, and I wondered how people could possibly do that to other people. All of the sudden I realized that I was guilty of the same thing. I read a few articles, and became Vegan that day. I am SO relieved. I feel that I have finally come into myself after a lifetime of contributing to and IGNORING animal suffering, exploitation, misery and death.<br><br><br><br>
I will never, ever be quiet again. I will let the world know what is happening. I have been there. I have seen it all first hand. I have caused it. I am now going to put my mouth where my beliefs are.<br><br><br><br>
I am happy about one thing. My 5 year old daughter has never, ever liked meat. I am starting to tell her the truth about what animal products really are, and it wouldn't surprise me if she went Vegan when she is old enough to choose.<br><br><br><br>
Peace,<br><br><br><br>
EquiPro
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
765 Posts
I've been a vegetarian for just a year (one day I'll make the full switch I'm sure), but I got the point where my conscience would absolutely not let me eat any more meat. I refused to eat veal and snapper soup when I was a kid and I cried for hours once when I watched my brother gut fish - they were still breathing! Eating anything off the bone I began to find more and more disturbing, especially the smell...bleh! I could go on and on, but you get the idea <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,398 Posts
I never ate meat often when I was little either...my dad jokes I must have seen "big bird visits the slaughterhouse" on sesame street.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,211 Posts
I'm a pretty unlikely vegetarian, but as a kid, I often used to refuse meat because I didn't like it, unless it was junk food, so I guess I've not been big on meat for a while.<br><br><br><br>
But when the BSE crisis was happening in 1996, I didn't want to eat beef anymore. So I didn't, and then in 97, i gave up all meat, because I gradually became sickened at the fact that i was eating an animal that was once living.<br><br><br><br>
But as a kid, i used to be very critical of vegetarianism. So I guess that I've changed dramatically.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
0 Posts
The turning point for me was when I saw a ship stacked several stories high of veal creats in Fremantle in Western Australia.<br><br><br><br>
I was watching the boat slowly make its way out of the docks and wondering what its load was, until I saw thousands of little shiny noses and pairs of sad eyes belonging to scared animals probably wondering where they were being taken. I knew at that point that there was no way I could open my wallet again to buy a burger and pay for this to continue.<br><br><br><br>
And I haven't looked back since.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,072 Posts
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by Loki</i><br><br><b>I'm a pretty unlikely vegetarian, but as a kid, I often used to refuse meat because I didn't like it, unless it was junk food, so I guess I've not been big on meat for a while.<br><br><br><br></b></div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
Thats odd I was the same i would eat meat pies (a major thing in australia), take away burgers etc but never steak.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,606 Posts
Ah yes. And I never could cook with meat. That forced me to see my food for what it really is. As long as I could pretend it wasn't a cow, I could eat it.<br><br><br><br>
My mother said "one day you're going to have to learn to make hamburgers." I said, "when I move out and start cooking for myself, I'll go vegetarian." And, ta da!<br><br><br><br>
I always REALLY had a problem with eggs, too. When we'd make cookies or muffins I could never be the one to crack them. I'd hand it to my brother and have to leave the room.<br><br><br><br>
And I could never stand looking at the Thanksgiving turkey.<br><br><br><br>
It's odd, that for as much as I hated the thought of meat, and basically avoided eating it... It took me eighteen years to say, "oh, I'm a vegetarian."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,072 Posts
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by EquiPro</i><br><br><b>I would have never imagined I would become vegetarian, let alone Vegan. I am kind of Like Paul (Saul) on the road to Damascas to kill all of the Christians until he is struck blind by a vision of Jesus. Of course, when he finally regains his sight, he becomes the greatest spreader of the Good News ever.<br><br><br><br>
BTW - I'm not a believer in religion - I just have thoroughly read the Bible and like a lot of the implications of the stories.<br><br><br><br>
So... I grew up on a farm where my stepdad was a polo player. He always had tons of animals: 25 horses, 15 or 20 dogs (he didn't believe in having them spayed, so there were always tons of puppies and young dogs around), pigs that we would raise for pork, cattle that we would raise for beef, a chicken here or there, etc.<br><br><br><br>
The problem was, he didn't take good care of his animals. I was only 10, but was the main caretaker. I would beg him to take them to the vet, but he wouldn't do it until it was too later. There are all sorts of tragic stories of those years....far too many to write.<br><br><br><br>
I decided at a young age that I wanted to be a veterinarian. We lived in Ithaca, NY, so I went to Cornell to get an Animal Science degree and to go to vet school. In the meantime, I played polo for Cornell, and ended up the captain of our national championship team in 1984. Along with playing polo, I, unfortunately, had to study too (damn it). There were 3 defining incidents:<br><br><br><br>
1) I worked for one of the most prominant vets of Cornell after he retired. I went to VT. and worked with him that summer, as he had a large animal (predominately horse) practice. Practicing veterinary medicine is not what I had imagined when reading James Harriot. We dehorned cattle, we "neutered" pigs, we inseminated and pregnancy checked cows, and, mostly we performed "caslicks" operations on mares (where you sew up the vulva to ensure pregnancy). All of this left a bad taste in my mouth - so much of it is done with no concern for the animals perceptions and feelings. I began to question my desire to be a vet.<br><br><br><br>
2) I worked for the Cornell Dairy Teaching and Research center as a cow milker for a summer. It was SO disgusting. We would milk 475 cows in 4 hours, and I can't begin to tell you how awful it was. I almost quit consuming dairy products there and then, but I loved milk and cheese, and decided that was the way that it was.<br><br><br><br>
3) In one of my upper level physiology courses, we had to do an animal experiment where we would put a caratid canula into a rabbit and hook it up to some EKG machines and such. Of course, this meant killing the rabbits after we were done. I was very traumatized by this. One time, we couldn't get an ear vein. The poor rabbit was in the stocks, and we were poking around it's ears until they were just a mass of hematomas. Finally, the professor came in and put the rabbit under. As it went under it SCREAMED. I lost it. I could barely finish that lab, and, thank god, I was gone at an away polo match on the day that we were supposed to repeat the experiment in front of the class. I gave up vet school then and there, and took a minor in International Development in Animal Science.<br><br><br><br>
After college I became a professional horse trainer/ seller, and a professional polo player, and exploited animals non-stop. I finally burned out and quit.<br><br><br><br>
I then got into the Conversations With God series and started to see us all as one - including the life on earth around me. I joined Amnesty International and started reading up on exploitation and torture. During this past war, I was reading about Sadam Husseins brutality towards people, and I wondered how people could possibly do that to other people. All of the sudden I realized that I was guilty of the same thing. I read a few articles, and became Vegan that day. I am SO relieved. I feel that I have finally come into myself after a lifetime of contributing to and IGNORING animal suffering, exploitation, misery and death.<br><br><br><br>
I will never, ever be quiet again. I will let the world know what is happening. I have been there. I have seen it all first hand. I have caused it. I am now going to put my mouth where my beliefs are.<br><br><br><br>
I am happy about one thing. My 5 year old daughter has never, ever liked meat. I am starting to tell her the truth about what animal products really are, and it wouldn't surprise me if she went Vegan when she is old enough to choose.<br><br><br><br>
Peace,<br><br><br><br>
EquiPro</b></div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
Thats inspirational. I just wonder why you didn't raise your daughter vegan from the start? Is the mother vegan? (sorry i know its personal)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
416 Posts
I never liked the taste of meat apart from chicken, which i stopped eating years before i went veggie because i felt guilty for liking the taste of an animal. When i was about 7 we went to "piggie land" and i wouldn't stroke or talk to the pigs because all i could think of was how they were no different to what i was going to eat that night, also i wouldn't look at cows in fields or anything because i knew how they were going to end up. I used to shout at people for killing insects from about the age of 9, so i guess i have always cared about animals<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,606 Posts
Oh, insects! I was always the one scooping up the random spiders and carrying them gently outside, instead of stomping them. I'd yell at my mother when she would just crush them.
 
1 - 20 of 59 Posts
Top