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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Reading another thread made my curious to hear how many sick days and other paid time off you get from work (for those that are employed full time). Do you feel you get a fair number of days off? Do you like your benefits? Do they carry over each year, or anything special?<br><br><br><br>
I'll start and say that my job gives an awesome amount of paid time off. I consider myself very lucky in that regard. It's been one of the major motivating factors in sticking with this job despite considering a career change.<br><br><br><br>
I receive 8 sick days, 2 personal days, 2 mental health days, 9 paid (floating) holidays, and I now (in my 7th year) get 20 vacation days, and we get 3 bereavement days for any relative that dies. We also now have the option of buying or selling one week of vacation, if we'd prefer extra money or extra days off. And all unused days off get carried over to the next year, with sick days accumulating indefinitely, and other paid days off accumulating for up to 16 months. We used to have the option to donate sick days to other employers, but do not have that option any longer. Plus, when I switched from a 5-day work week to a 4-day work week my number of paid days off did not change! The only downside is that any day we do take off, even if you are sick, we are responsible for finding our own substitute to work for us which can sometimes be challenging during true last minute illnesses. Other benefits include available medical insurance (not the best, but better than nothing), available dental insurance, 20k life insurance, disability insurance, and our 403b contributions are matched 75%.<br><br><br><br>
The rationale for offering better-than-average benefits they say is to make up for the fact that they can't afford to pay very good salaries. Instead of giving a Christmas bonus for example, we got the addition of 2 mental health days.
 

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I'm an independent contractor right now, so no bennies for me.<br><br><br><br>
When I worked at a different company fulltime with the same job title, we had pretty good insurance, life insurance, vacation, sick days, holidays, and a floating holiday. I don't really remember amounts, as it's been a year and a half since I left. Sick days rolled over, but had to be used by the end of the next calendar year. Vacation was accrued by how much you worked. I don't recall exact amounts, but it accrued pretty quickly. I worked a lot of overtime, there was lots available. If you worked holidays, you got 2 1/2 (time and a half plus paid holiday.)<br><br>
They had an Aflac rep in for those of us who wanted supplemental insurance. I'm glad I participated in that because I got to keep it once I left, so I still have accident insurance, disability insurance, and cancer insurance.<br><br>
They had 403bs that they matched 3% of.<br><br><br><br>
The benefits of being an IC are: flexibility in scheduling, making your own; travel stipend; tax writeoffs; mileage; no taxes taken out of checks, so they look super fat; etc.<br><br><br><br>
The downside, no sick time, no paid holidays (just time and a half,) weekly maximum of hours, writing big fat checks to federal and state goverments every 3 months to pay taxes since they aren't withheld; etc.
 

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I don't get any sick days. I only get stat holidays if they happen to fall on my regular days of work, since I normally take Sunday and Mondays off, I only get one or two a year.<br><br><br><br>
I do on the other hand get 3 weeks paid vacation and $ 150 a month on top of my regular salary towards health insurance (my insurance is only $50 bucks/month, so that's a-ok with me).<br><br><br><br>
I will also occasionally get paid for an extra day I take off, just as a gift, or as compensation for working 50+ hours a week.<br><br><br><br>
Basically, for me, it could be better, could be worse.
 

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403b?<br><br>
Mine is roughly similar to yours. I don't pay much attention to mine since HR rarely seems to actually debit me for time I take, but it looks like I now have 9 paid holidays and two "floating" holidays along with 7 sick days and 2 personal leave days. Looks like 6+ years (I effectively have 10+) maxes vacation at 20 days == 4 weeks. Wow, I thought it was three ... I recently transferred back to my old group, which via corporate evolution more or less meant switching divisions/subsidiaries, and the rules changed a bit. The company matches the first 4% of my 401k contributions @ 100%, with some sort of vesting that is entirely unclear to me. My health benefits have progressively eroded and the share of their cost that I pay has increased. I'm now stuck with Aetna medical and Genworth dental. A couple of my providers are now no longer in-network so I'm going to be shelling out more to keep seeing them. The company has a 2x salary life insurance policy for me, which would way more than cover my sister's costs to get out here and liquidate my estate when I bite it. The documents say $20k for "rotational staff".
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
403b is the retirement plan for non-profits. It's the equivalent of the 401k in the for-profit world.
 

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OIC. Back before we went for-profit (and got acquired (twice)) we had some sort of TIAA-CREF deal that turned out to actually be compulsory after a year of employment.
 

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One of the things that's been amazing to discover here is the difference in benefit levels. The general vacation allotment (from day one) is about 5 weeks, in addition to 8 or 9 public holidays. It's not uncommon for companies, including IS's to close the week of Christmas, with pay, so basically that's another week of vacation. Maternity leave is currently guaranteed for 26 weeks, going up to 39 next year. Life Insurance and a pension contribution are standard.<br><br><br><br>
Compare this to my field in the States, where you often didn't get any vacation until after you were there a year, or perhaps earned a certain amount of time, per pay period. Holidays were paid, but only if you were full-time. Insurance was sometimes offered, sometimes not. Pension plans and employer contributions also varied. Standard maternity leave is 6 weeks, counted as disability pay (60% or so of pay).<br><br><br><br>
Now I know that childcare is not the goldmine of professions, but still. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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I work permanent part-time. When I was looking for this job it was the only conditions under which I would accept work, having worked casual with no sick days and no holidays, and being able to be sacked at almost no notice for way too long.<br><br><br><br>
I'm fortunate enough to be paid enough to work part-time and still have enough to live on, and by myself too, have 8 sick days a year, and four weeks paid holidays. Holidays attrack a 17% leave loading too! So extra spending money on the hols, yay. I get paid time and a half when I work Saturdays, time and three quarters if I work a Sunday, which is rare, and double time and a half for any public holiday. If I don't work the public holiday I get paid a full days pay for staying home.<br><br><br><br>
I enjoy my working conditions, they are certainly better than most of the world's. Downside for me though is the commute time, I do not live in the same city I work in and, as you might know, Australian cities do not exactly nestle cheek by jowl. Long, long commute, not terribly frequent trains the often make me late for work.
 

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My benefits are mixed. I get 15 days off plus 9 holidays a year. The 15 days can be taken as vacation or sick time, so I appreciate getting more vacation because I tend to be healthy. I don't pay anything for medical but the insurance is minimal. I pay for vision care, dental and supplemental life insurance. They match up to 2% of my salary 100% with no vesting for 401K contributions. We are not a public company (and don't plan to go public) so there is no stock purchase plan and no options.<br><br><br><br>
The plus side is work is 9 miles from home so it's a 15 minute commute in the mornings and 25 minutes home.
 

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I get 9 holidays, 6 sick days, 15 vacation days (6 years of service). Pretty crappy. 8 weeks of maternity, but I can take 12 weeks more unpaid. Lovely. the US is so messed up.
 

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I guess I should add that 7 am - 7 pm is base pay, 7 pm to 12 am is 10% more, 12 am to 7 am is 20% more. Weekends are always 10% more.<br><br>
If I was an employee, they'd pay for my workshops and certification and etc. Since I'm not, I have to pay for all that on my own (i've paid $600 to take the national test <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/shocked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":eek:">). However they do a lot of free workshops for us, since we have to have a certain amount of hours of continuing education to keep our certs up.
 

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I get 15 holiday days, two "other" days and one family emergency day. They do not carry over year to year, it's use them or loose them. I do not get sick time, but if I am sick I can stay home and still get paid (I'm salaried). I have good medical benefits also.<br><br><br><br>
Once I've been there six years I'll get five more holiday days a year.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>IamJen</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Standard maternity leave is 6 weeks, counted as disability pay (60% or so of pay).<br><br><br></div>
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FMLA provides 12 weeks for maternity. It is 24 in Oregon.<br><br><br><br>
I get 10 sick days, I can roll over 5 (15 max in a year). It is understood that if you actually take them all (unless something happens and you have to take a week or so at once) you aren't going to be promoted. I think it is that way everywhere though. I wish we had a PTO bank, seperate sick days favor people with kids and I'm not big on subsidizing child birth. We get 2-6 weeks of vacation, based on years of service. Senior individual contributors and managers generally start higher than 2 though. We can buy or sell one week and roll over up to a week not to exceed 6 weeks in a year.<br><br><br><br>
We are matched 100% on the first 4% and 50% on the next two percent for 401k. Additionally, we get a once a year contribution beginning at 2% of salary and working up to 8% of salary with years of service. We have profit sharing, but it isn't great. 4% bonuses have been typical but we won't get one this year because we are going to miss our earnings goal. We have solid insurance: medical, dental, disibility, life and vision at a very reasonable expense to us (vision is free, dental is about $40 a year).
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>asp3</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
They match up to 2% of my salary 100% with no vesting for 401K contributions.</div>
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that doesn't make any sense. They must have a vesting schedule for the employer contributions - either it's graduated (20% year 1, 40% year 2, etc) or a cliff - ie, a 5 year cliff would mean that you're 0% vested for your first 5 years - at some point as defined by your plan, the employer contributions become vested. They have to vest at some point, otherwise there's no point in the employer contributing.<br><br><br><br><br><br>
ohhhhhhhhhhhh! wait. remilard suggested you meant that employer contributions are immediately vested. gotcha!! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Kiz</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I'm fortunate enough to be paid enough to work part-time and still have enough to live on, and by myself too, have 8 sick days a year, and four weeks paid holidays. Holidays attrack a 17% leave loading too! So extra spending money on the hols, yay.</div>
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<br><br><br>
Yeah, it's great isn't it, Australia has to be the only place in the world where you get paid <span style="text-decoration:underline;">more</span> to go on holiday <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> Even with the recent IR reforms we're still very fortunate.<br><br><br><br>
I get 12 sick days per year all of which I take whether Im sick or not because they don't carry over. Six weeks holidays with 17% leave-loading. I can take leave without pay at any time also if I need it.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>remilard</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
FMLA provides 12 weeks for maternity. It is 24 in Oregon.</div>
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I should've stated that it's paid leave. FMLA only requires the time off/job security, not pay.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>IamJen</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I should've stated that it's paid leave. FMLA only requires the time off/job security, not pay.</div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
1. Most full time American employees have disibility insurance.<br><br><br><br>
2. Why should employers be expected to subsidize child birth anyway?
 

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I was shocked to find out that maternity leave here in the UK is guaranteed for 26 weeks, going up to 39 next year. In Louisiana you got 6 weeks.
 

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I wasn't making a judgement as to the worthiness of maternity leave, just noting the differences.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>OregonAmy</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
that doesn't make any sense. They must have a vesting schedule for the employer contributions - either it's graduated (20% year 1, 40% year 2, etc) or a cliff - ie, a 5 year cliff would mean that you're 0% vested for your first 5 years - at some point as defined by your plan, the employer contributions become vested. They have to vest at some point, otherwise there's no point in the employer contributing.<br><br><br><br><br><br>
ohhhhhhhhhhhh! wait. remilard suggested you meant that employer contributions are immediately vested. gotcha!! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"></div>
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Yep, that's what I meant. Now I know how to describe it correctly, it is immediately vested.<br><br><br><br>
Thanks! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/hi.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":hi:">
 
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