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I am 24. I have been to therapy 3 times since I was 9 but it never lasted over a month because I just didn't find anyone I felt I could talk to. Plus they were all women and for some odd reason, I find it easier to talk to men. I have been told many things too-- bipolar, possible learning disability, anxiety,depression. none of them ever agreed and I ended up stoping all the meds because I always felt I was "better" than the meds in the sence that I felt if I prayed enough and believed enough I could deal with it on my own. Last april my insurance offered a phone chat thing where someone talked on the phone with me once every two weeks for 2 months. I got matched with a guy and did really well, I even managed to get well enough where when I flew on a plane that June I WAS NOT nervous. I seriously thought I was doing better. Now I am afraid everything is coming back and soon I will be in a deep depression or have major anxiety attacks it if does. I am not close with anyone in my family enough to talk about all my problems other than my mom but in some cases I cant even talk to her, i am too afraid of judgement and getting her angry. I dont have alot of friends. I talk to some online and it helps to a point but it isnt the same as being able to talk in person. I am wondering if you think I should go back to therapy? If yes,.... how can I find one who accepts my insurance? What kind of therapist should I see? If no, what should I do to keep me from going back down that dark road? I really need advice. Thanks<br><br>
melissa
 

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I definitly think you should see a therapist. I myself see a therapist and a psychiatrist... I have no insurance, and for therapy it's $7 a visit, the psych is $13- they also know my situation, so I get my meds for free. I was asked beforehand if I had a preference between male/female.<br><br><br><br>
I reccomend calling around to various places, having consultations w/different therapists, and start seeing the one you feel most comfortable with. Some might be able to set up payment plans if they don't accept your insurance. Even talk to your GP about it and see what (s)he reccomends. (that's who set up where I currently go) GL! Wish I had better advice! Keep us updated... hope you find something that works for you!
 

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I cant say whether you should see a therapist, although I dont see why you keep following that path if it dosent seem to work for you. From what I understand, therapists help you to identify and change destructive or self-defeating behaviors. I never thought of them as "someone to talk to." If you've been down the dark road already, why go down it again?
 

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This is just conjecture on my part, but you sound like a prime candidate for one of the SSRIs. I think you should go see a psychiatrist (<span style="text-decoration:underline;">not</span> a clinical psychologist) and fully explain your problem.
 

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I agree with Washoe about seeing a psychiatrist. If you have a depressive illness (unipolar or bipolar depression) this is widely accepted as a physiological condition and not something you can talk your self out of or beat with prayer. Not saying talk and prayer won't help, just saying odds are they won't be enough.
 

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Just wanted to comment that insurance won';t usually cover adequate amounts of therapy to make a difference.<br><br>
I get $500 a year for therapy, but therapy is around $80 & up an hour.<br><br>
That limited amount of therapy is useless for someone with severe problems, & yours are in that category if you have bipolar, serious anxiety or serious depression.<br><br>
I recommend trying a naturopath instead, as its cheaper & they can do biochemical stuff that is far better than most pharmeceuticals.<br><br>
You can also look for free therapy, or sliding scale, but sometimes there is a "price" for that as well, like bs from christian counsellors who say you just need Jesus, etc.
 

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>>This is just conjecture on my part, but you sound like a prime candidate for one of the SSRI’s.>><br><br><br><br>
This conjecture is dubious. SSRIs are only marginally effective for anxiety and usually cause problems for people with bipolar.<br><br><br><br>
ebola
 

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I don't think that's entirely accurate, ebola. SSRIs are the most common kind of antidepressants prescribed, and <i>can</i> cause problems for people with bipolar. But I don't agree it's accurate to say they<i>usually</i> cause problems. (They caused problems for me or just didn't work, I do have to say, but I don't know that is typical)
 

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SSRIs very often induce mania and subsequent cycling in people with bipolar.<br><br>
I would say that they're downright dangerous.<br><br><br><br>
ebola
 

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Ok, ebola, but you're not a psychiatrist. SSRIs are frequently (mostly) prescribed to bipolar patients by psychiatrists along with a mood stabilizer.<br><br><br><br>
Only a very irresponsible psychiatrist would prescribe any antidepressant to a bipolar patient without a mood stabilizer. So, are you claiming most psychiatrists are irresponsible, or what else could be your point? I guess I'm just not sure what you're trying to say here.... It seems like you're saying SSRIs are dangerous to bipolar people no matter what, when they're really just dangerous when wrongly prescribed...well, duh - any drug is dangerous when wrongly prescribed.<br><br><br><br>
Anyway, it just bugs me when people say things like "such and such is dangerous!" without qualifying the statement.<br><br><br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wall.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":wall:"><br><br><br><br>
People get spooked enough about seeking help for mental illness without others giving that kind of "warning."
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Gnome Chomsky</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
This conjecture is dubious. SSRIs are only marginally effective for anxiety and usually cause problems for people with bipolar.</div>
</div>
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FineBach Flower Remedies then, whatever. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/rolleyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":rolleyes:"> In my amateur opinion, she needs to be evaluated by a medical practitioner rather than a clinical psychologist, which is the primary point I was trying to make.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Gnome Chomsky</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
SSRIs very often induce mania and subsequent cycling in people with bipolar.<br><br>
I would say that they're downright dangerous.<br><br><br><br>
ebola</div>
</div>
<br><br><br><br><br>
I have heard this from several psychiatrists. My current psychiatrist only uses them for depression & anxiety, not bipolar. I asked her this once, when I thought I might be cyclothymic & she had prescribed Effexor, which is an SSRI/SSNI.
 

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i think getting therapy and whatever medical support that you need is a good idea.<br><br><br><br>
i also recommend calling around.<br><br><br><br>
and in general, i recommend some therapy for everyone whom i meet. i just think it's an excellent modality that can teach some great skills for self knowledge. so, anyone--even 'healthy' people should get therapy. I got therapy a number of years ago, and i considered therapy a few months ago. I realized it wasn't necessary (i wasn't going for specific goals, just to abate loneliness and i feel that's an inappropriate use if i could find another outlet, which i did). But, i wouldn't hesitate to go back into therapy if i felt that i needed help with anything or emotional/psychological skills to help me.
 

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If you feel this is something you can't beat on your own, there's nothing wrong with asking for help. Unfortunetly, now a days you go in to see the doctor and for some reason you always end up with a medication form when you leave. It's hard to find a good doctor, but once you do it can really help.<br><br>
I don't recommend doing phone therapy, body language is very important in communicating, especially if situations like therapy, or atleast in my opinion it is.<br><br>
There's no harm in trying, if you go and you don't like the doctor or just don't like therapy, atleast you know you tried.
 

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One possible problem could be expecting instant results. If a patient expects to walk in, describe their issues to the therapist, and the therapist will wave a magic wand to make it all go away, that's unrealistic. Results may take a lot of time and effort from both parties.<br><br><br><br>
I don't know MNM03 well enough to say either way. Just putting it out there as a possibility.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>skylark</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
If a patient expects to walk in, describe their issues to the therapist, and the therapist will wave a magic wand to make it all go away, that's unrealistic. Results may take a lot of time and effort from both parties.<br></div>
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Actually, I would tend to agree. Pharmaceutical intervention should represent a last resort line of defense against anxiety disorders. I myself have a mild anxiety disorder which my doctor informs me is of genetic origin. I got off easy. It only flares up about once a year, lasts for about a week, and goes away by itself. My doctor wanted to try one of the SSRIs (Wellbutrin, to be specific), but I found that it only made the problem worse. I wound up throwing a months supply of the drug in the trash. I told my doctor that I would rather just tough it out, and he agreed that this would be a suitable option if I felt that I could handle it. I have, however, discovered that sharply curtailing my caffeine intake, and eliminating alcohol and the monosaccharide fructose from my diet produces rather spectacular results. It also helps immensely to just keep busy and always have an interesting project to work on. Im scared s**tless of the benzodiazepines and (probably) wouldnt touch them with a ten-foot pole. I do use them for dental work and public speaking situations, however. So under normal circumstances, I would be the last person to knee-jerkingly suggest that a person with an anxiety disorder immediately trot off to a clinician. However, in my limited understand of clinical psychology, I feel intuitively that in MNM03s case this is an avenue of treatment worth investigating.
 

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Give a male psychiatrist a try. Try his dope. Find a "talking doctor" (psychologist) too. See if it helps. More importantly, get in the game! Focus on your goals and meeting people you can have honest conversations with minus the counterproductive judgement!
 

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Yes, I definitely think you should talk to someone professional. Firstly because you say your past therapy never lasted more than a month; you will NOT be able to find someone who can "cure" you in less than a month. In fact, probably most of the treatments you try will take a very, very long time before they start to kick in. It's a lot more common than you think to give up because you feel like it's not working.<br><br><br><br>
Secondly, if you feel that you can talk to men more easily than women, why did you go back twice to a female therapist? Next time try what you think will help you more.<br><br><br><br>
About the multiple diagnoses, that is also a lot more common than you think. I got 3 different diagnoses before I found one that fit; another friend of mine has been diagnosed with well over 10 different disorders and she still hasn't found one that stands the test of time. If you don't give up, you will find a treatment and/or a diagnosis that fit you.<br><br><br><br>
About feeling like you were "better" than your medication; one of the common myths about psychiatric treatment is that your only option is medication. In addition to just living on pills, you can also use medication as a temporary "crutch" while you undergo another type of therapy, and there is cognitive behavior therapy, naturopaths, lifestyle changes, cognitive analytical therapy, counseling, acupuncture, reiki, etc. Remember that just having "someone to talk to" is not going to make you get better.<br><br><br><br>
About your anxiety fluctuating, this is also extremely normal. Most people with depression, anxiety, and similar problems go weeks, months, or even years without having any problems and then some time with having a lot of problems. I know people with panic disorder can have a panic attack then not have another one for 20 years, then have them every day for a month, etc. A common mistake is thinking that you're "cured" and you can backslide in whatever therapy you've chosen.<br><br><br><br>
Now, if you do choose to go to therapy, you can find one on your insurance by contacting your insurance company. They should have an online list or something similar of professionals they support. Look at their website and call their customer service number.<br><br><br><br>
As for what type of therapist you should see, here's what I suggest: go to different random ones until you find someone who has good vibes. When you've found someone you feel really comfortable with, don't give up after a month!<br><br><br><br>
Hope I helped. Best of luck to you!
 
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