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Not sure if this is the right place for this, but anyway . . .

What is your opinion on shopping locally?

I just finished reading the book Cheap: The high cost of discount culture by Ellen Ruppel and I am shocked at the environmental destruction that is happening due to people wanting cheaply farmed shrimp and other products such as forests being cut down illegally for making cheap furniture. Not to mention the amount of fuel being used to transport items across continents just to keep prices down when it is just as easy to grow potatoes or whatever else in the home country with no real "need" to import from elsewhere.

As a result of what I've read so far, I've been choosing to shop at local stores when possible and this week I discovered a food co-op down the street from me, which is very exciting because they try to stay organic and local and socially responsible. It also seems a bit strange to go buy something new when there is perfectly good furniture to be found in second hand shops and antique stores, the buying of which would reduce the need to cut down more trees.

Anyway, guess I'm just looking for like-minded people. I feel as though my eyes are being opened. Currently reading Locavore to get more insight.
 

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I buy everything I can from local and/or low impact companies, and it's very easy in the Pacific NW.
 

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I'm glad you're looking to make changes


I research almost everything I buy and try to buy only things that are produced in the South Pacific (my region), that are second hand or that are fair trade. There are some items that have proved difficult to acquire e.g. a hot water bottle in winter
And sometimes buying local things are not comparable in price e.g. I looked at buying a rainjacket and a locally produced one was about $200 more than an overseas produced one, I simply couldn't afford that. But on the whole, I think its really important that I know where my product comes from. Not only does it reduce carbon miles, it also means that you know if you are buying from an ethical and/or enivornmentally friendly company, and you can support local economy
 

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The whole concept of buying locally, and the impacts of it on the environment are pretty new to me. I visit the farmers market and buy all my lunches and snacks there, but I'm still working on it
 

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I shop locally as much as possible.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Limes View Post

You grow your own?
No, just in general, I shop as little as possible. Aside from food and drink, household/kitchen, and toiletries I can't really remember the last thing I really absolutely needed, so I avoid shopping. I haven't bought many things via thrift stores aside from a belt and some pants for work, but I will look to those next time I actually do need something.
 

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i try to only buy local produce. Very lucky to live in southern California where there is an abundance of amazing food all year round, its avocado season right now and we buy 2 bags of avocados for $5 that come from a farm less than 5 miles from home.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by luvourmother View Post

i try to only buy local produce. Very lucky to live in southern California where there is an abundance of amazing food all year round, its avocado season right now and we buy 2 bags of avocados for $5 that come from a farm less than 5 miles from home.
I would love to live somehwere such as southern California. I love avocados. However, Nebraska and Iowa don't have much for locally grown produce in the winter. Considering transportation of food accounts for only a small amount of the total energy used in food production, I don't have too many qualms about buying produce from other parts of the country or hemisphere (the closer from where I can get it, the better). The shipment of mass quantities of food is pretty efficient. I realize that buying local isn't all about just energy and carbon emissions, but for part of the year I don't feel that I have an option if I want to remain a healthy vegan.
 
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