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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ever experienced it in your part of the UK? Being from Northern Ireland, I experienced it a LOT. Living in Scotland now, I experience it a lot STILL.<br>
Last night I had people doing racist Irish accents (yes, racist, because saying 'top of the mornin' to ya' is offensive, don't do it) at me, then quizzing me on my 'side.' It's disgusting, and it makes me sick to think that you 'have' to either side with the UVF/UDA or the IRA.
 

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Nope, not where I grew up (The Black Country). Well, not that I've ever noticed. I think there's such a lack of interest in Christianity that it would be really unnatural for anyone to bother with that sort of thing.<br><br>
I was about to say I don't even know anyone who goes to church, then I realised my Brother-in-law's Mum & Sister go.. Then I realised that my Brother-in-law in Catholic (my sister was Christened in some sort of other church, Methodist? who knows..).
 

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I think it's because you are from Northern Ireland and living in Scotland, where in some parts it still matters. I don't think my dad has experienced any racism for a long time (he's from Roscommon) although he did when he first came over here in the 1940's.<br>
In England, as Goldman Dancing said, most of us are secular, or close to it, so religion (and sides) aren't a big thing.
 

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I live in Coatbridge, Scotland, which is dubbed "little ireland". it's predominantly Catholic, where all the Irish came over during the famine. So yeah, something like my great great great grandfather came over from Ireland. I was raised Catholic, though don't follow religion anymore, and am a huge Celtic fan. Old Firm days are pretty intense to say the least.<br><br>
I also think that what is happening with Neil Lennon is absolutely atrocious. <a href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-glasgow-west-13129139" target="_blank">http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotlan...-west-13129139</a>
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yea, I have a lot of Irish-Scot friends actually, and they seem to get this nonsense all the time, especially the ones from the likes of Paisley. I've never followed the religion or the football side, but I do have political views. Still, I don't like to air them in those sorts of situations.<br><br>
Many's a time where guessing by the word inflection or colour of shirt someone had on has saved me from a beating! Most ridiculous thing I ever heard though was my friend who was accosted;<br><br>
'Are you a Protestant or a Catholic?'<br>
'I'm a Buddhist'<br>
'Aw, that's well cool... but are you a Protestant Buddhist or a Catholic Buddhist?'
 

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Wow, I didn't know that saying "Top of the mornin' to ya" is considered racist.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>sequoia</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2871734"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Wow, I didn't know that saying "Top of the mornin' to ya" is considered racist.</div>
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A lot of Irish people seem comfortable with the drunken, pig under the arm, ladder stealing stereotype that is thrown around, but I for one do NOT appreciate such things. Mockery of the accent, too, insinuates a singular accent across the country (I am from Belfast, not Dublin, listen to the difference!), and reduces my people to what I consider no less offensive a stereotype than you see in racist portrayals of the African diaspora, Asian peoples, etc. In fact, there are some English newspapers that printed guides which suggested that the Irish were a 'missing link' between 'civilised' Anglo-Saxon descendents and 'negroes,' accompanied with racially charged images.<br><br>
Maybe I seem a little radical or sore about it, but I honestly believe that <a href="http://www.westindiangirl.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/05/lucky-charms21.jpg" target="_blank">this</a> is no less offensive than blackface.
 

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Oh, and I've spent a lot of time knocking about in Brum which has a massive Irish population (I'll leave you to do your own research for various notorious Birmingham-Irish related facts +/-) and I've never witnessed any sectarianism around Digbeth/Highgate/Moseley or anywhere else.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Kappa</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2871837"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
A lot of Irish people seem comfortable with the drunken, pig under the arm, ladder stealing stereotype that is thrown around, but I for one do NOT appreciate such things. Mockery of the accent, too, insinuates a singular accent across the country (I am from Belfast, not Dublin, listen to the difference!), and reduces my people to what I consider no less offensive a stereotype than you see in racist portrayals of the African diaspora, Asian peoples, etc. In fact, there are some English newspapers that printed guides which suggested that the Irish were a 'missing link' between 'civilised' Anglo-Saxon descendents and 'negroes,' accompanied with racially charged images.<br><br>
Maybe I seem a little radical or sore about it, but I honestly believe that <a href="http://www.westindiangirl.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/05/lucky-charms21.jpg" target="_blank">this</a> is no less offensive than blackface.</div>
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I suppose I didn't know this because people where I live aren't really racist against the Irish. They tend to focus their hatred on Mexicans.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Kappa</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2871837"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
A lot of Irish people seem comfortable with the drunken, pig under the arm, ladder stealing stereotype that is thrown around, but I for one do NOT appreciate such things. Mockery of the accent, too, insinuates a singular accent across the country (I am from Belfast, not Dublin, listen to the difference!), and reduces my people to what I consider no less offensive a stereotype than you see in racist portrayals of the African diaspora, Asian peoples, etc. In fact, there are some English newspapers that printed guides which suggested that the Irish were a 'missing link' between 'civilised' Anglo-Saxon descendents and 'negroes,' accompanied with racially charged images.<br><br>
Maybe I seem a little radical or sore about it, but I honestly believe that <a href="http://www.westindiangirl.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/05/lucky-charms21.jpg" target="_blank">this</a> is no less offensive than blackface.</div>
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That's interesting. My father, the Irishman, is the first one to tell Irish jokes to anyone who will listen, whose general theme is to have a 'thick Mick' as the butt of the joke. And I can see how the jokes can be viewed as racism: but my theory is - the reason that the Irish have integrated so well in England, and are so highly thought of by most of the population (even during and after the IRA problems in the 70's/80's) is because they are happy to laugh at themselves, and just get on with their life and mix in with other nationalities, and are not always playing the race card. If you look at the immigrants who haven't got integrated so well, you often see the word racism used to apply loosely to anything (a joke, a phrase like 'top of the morning to ya', a certain look) - they see racism in everything.<br><br>
I'm not saying racism towards the Irish doesn't exist - and I would guess that in certain parts of Scotland it is rife - but in England, the Irish are generally well liked and have integrated well. People here are proud to say they are Irish or part Irish - I generally find that English people are jealous of my heritage, because they see the Irish as a friendly, amusing, warm, and generally hard working bunch of people.<br><br>
Perhaps you need to move a little further south?<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>goldman_dancing</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2871408"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Nope, not where I grew up (The Black Country). Well, not that I've ever noticed. I think there's such a lack of interest in Christianity that it would be really unnatural for anyone to bother with that sort of thing.<br><br>
I was about to say I don't even know anyone who goes to church, then I realised my Brother-in-law's Mum & Sister go.. Then I realised that my Brother-in-law in Catholic (my sister was Christened in some sort of other church, Methodist? who knows..).</div>
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I grew up in the west country and I experienced pretty much the same. Growing up I didn't know anyone who went to church, and now I only know three people who do.<br><br>
I've never experienced any sectarianism, although of the people I do know who go to church it seems they have more against other sects of christianity than they do atheism - but they seem to have a problem with the concept, not at all the people who are different sects, so I wouldn't call it "sectarianism".<br><br>
I have to say I think mimicing accents is only racist when done in a certain way, and in a certain context. TBH I know very little about ireland or the irish conflicts, but I figure irish-jokes in places where there are racial tension is completely different to racial jokes in places (or times) where there is no racial tension what-so-ever. Where I grew up I never saw any irish-racial predjudice so the context would be completely different.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>angie54321</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2872260"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I'm not saying racism towards the Irish doesn't exist - and I would guess that in certain parts of Scotland it is rife - but in England, the Irish are generally well liked and have integrated well. People here are proud to say they are Irish or part Irish - I generally find that English people are jealous of my heritage, because they see the Irish as a friendly, amusing, warm, and generally hard working bunch of people.<br><br>
Perhaps you need to move a little further south?<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"></div>
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Sorry, snipping off to not flood the screen...<br><br>
But yea, I think the Irish have a very self depreceating humour... however I personally do find it to have gone too far, and from humour to expected behaviour and stereotyping. Since I don't drink, I notice it a lot more, because so many of the stereotypes are centred around alcoholism, and even wife-beating. I'm probably coming across as rather humourless in this thread, which might be only semi-fair as a representation of me, but I do feel that it needs to be said. People make jokes about me being in the IRA because I am a politically active Irish person...<br><br>
But I don't know about moving further South... I like Scottish people, and tbh it's generally English students that I don't get on with (or Australians, which saddens me!)
 

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I've never noticed Catholic/Protestant sectarianism a great deal, other than my father not seeming keen on them (I grew up in Wales, but Mum is a Londoner, Dad is from up north)... I've noticed other sectarianisms though, based on political belief (for example, different socialist, or other left wing groups).<br><br>
Obviously, I've seen many people be racist, where I'm from... Sometimes I felt it was weird, like because I didn't have an issue with immigrants, some people got angry at me. I've been spat at for going to an anti-war demonstration for example and we had people shouting racist things about Iraqi people (we have refugees in the town)... Not nice. People in my home town are friendly, but need to broaden their minds a bit...
 

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Being from Glasgow, there's Rangers/ Celtic, and I shudder at the idea of anyone I know going to an Old Firm game because it just doesn't seem safe. Although I'd say the majority don't have a sectarian attitude these days, there's a loud minority. I'd like to see the play 'I'm no a Billy I'm a Tim' which apparently deals with quite a lot of issues around sectarianism.
 
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