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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The other day I heard someone claim that seaweed isn't vegetarian. This is a new one to me. Has anyone else heard of such a thing? There was talk about all of the seacreatures that were killed to make it, like it was some sort of underwater honey.?.? I really am not understanding this one, as far a I'm aware seaweed is a plant that happens to grow underwater. The supposed proof was that they could sometimes find little creatures in their seaweed. I also sometimes find little creatures in my lettuce, but it is still a plant, but then again, what do I know? Comments?
 

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If the incidental deaths cause by harvesting a water plant made it not-vegetarian, then most produce isn't vegetarian (tilling)<br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br>
...unless there is something else I'm not aware of.
 

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It sounds like a wind-up from the omni camp.... <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/yes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":yes:"><br><br><br><br>
AFAIK, there's nothing about seaweed that would make it un-vegetarian or even un-vegan - unless there's something that I'm missing, too. *shrug*
 

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It's a plant and harvesting takes lives as with any other plant. I've once found a frozen (dead) snail in my brokkoli, but another time I had a live snail in the brokkoli, which I didn't eat because of the organic residues ...<br><br>
Seeaweed is great to meet your iodine needs.
 

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Since you decided to become a pescetarian and eat sea animals, I don't see why you are now worried about sea animals that get injured/killed while harvesting seaweed. Eating seaweed has got to cause a lot less harm to the animals than eating the animals themselves. It don't make sense bro.
 

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It makes perfect sense to me, kyo....<br><br><br><br>
The OP lives in a place where avoiding <b>all</b> animals is next to impossible (I've been in places like this, so I can definitely relate). Kitchens in Korea seem quite the rarity so it seems cooking for himself/his family is out. Rather than starve, though, he's opted to be a pescitarian/flexitarian for now and a vegan when he returns to Canada.<br><br><br><br>
IMO, he's trying to do the best he can in the situation he's in and that, I can certainly support. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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I disagree, my argument is valid even if what you say is true. It doesn't make sense to worry about seaweed more than the animals. More animals are killed by eating animals.<br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Kitchens in Korea seem quite the rarity</div>
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He might not have a kitchen if he's living in a hotel but I'm sure that most people in Korea have cooking facilities. I'm sure that the Koreans aren't living in the stone age. Please take note that I'm not criticizing gaianbudo for eating fish.
 

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I really don't know about Korea and cooking facilities to be honest (never lived there, sorry) so I can only go by Morning Calm's post in the Pescitarian thread when she said:<br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>MorningCalm</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Depends on whether you have a kitchen or not. (<b>Smaller apartments have just a single burner; larger apartments typically have only two and no oven.</b>)....</div>
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I don't know that I would term Koreans as living in the stone age, but I do believe that what's available to them there may/may not be what we have in "Western" countries.<br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Kyo</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Please take note that I'm not criticizing gaianbudo for eating fish.</div>
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Duly noted. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>gaianbudo</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
The other day I heard someone claim that seaweed isn't vegetarian.</div>
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While I haven't heard anyone say that seaweed itself isn't vegetarian, some of the more processed forms of it may not be. Laver, especially, tends to be seasoned with fish powder. When I buy it, I stick to the unflavored varities and buy the brands with the shortest list of ingredients (generally seaweed, oil, and salt).
 

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I would like to explain where I'm coming from a little better. It probably looks like I'm criticizing gaianbudo for eating fish because my argument undercuts his reason for eating fish but that's not my intention. I think that some people have been giving Asia a <a href="http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/bum+rap" target="_blank">bum rap</a> and I'm arguing against that.<br><br><br><br>
I never was in Korea but spent a couple weeks in Japan staying with a Japanese friend (that was about 30 years ago) and about three weeks in Thailand staying with a Thai friend (that was about 16 years ago). When I stayed with my Japanese friend I helped him cook and when I stayed with my Thai freind his mother did all the cooking. Neither of them had refrigerators but both had kitchens with cooking facilities. I'm sure that there are a lot of people in Asia without kitchens but am sure that nearly everyone that lives there has cooking facilities. It's not that hard to cook at home there; obviously there are a LOT of people doing it! Reading these two threads I got the impression that in Asia you need to eat out all the time because the cooking facilities are primitive or non-existent. But in the West we all have kitchens, stoves and refrigerators.<br><br><br><br>
Well, not all of us in the West have these luxuries. I have my own house with a fully equipped kitchen now. But when I was younger there were several places I lived where I didn't have a kitchen or stove but only a 2 burner hot plate. I rented a studio in San Fransisco with no kitchen or refrigerator but only a hotplate. I lived in a shared situation in Paia Maui with a kitchen and refrigerator and hotplate (all shared by 3 people). I rented a studio in Kahului Maui and didn't have a kitchen or refrigerator but only had a hotplate. There's more but you get the idea. Living without a kitchen, stove and refrigerator isn't that hard. I cooked rice in a pot and made different East Indian dishes and curry potatoes and lentils. I don't know if they had rice cookers back then but having one would have helped. Rice cookers are a very popular item in Asia because they eat so much rice there and rice cookers make rice cooking very easy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Why I am worried about anything is none of your business Kyo. This question was about seaweed. If you would like to respond to the question and have something to contribute then please do. Otherwise don't just follow me around attacking my eating habits. How many kitchens you've had is really not relavant either, I don't have to justify anything to you and it doesn't matter if I have 14 of them.<br><br>
The whole idea of the seaweed being not vegetarian does seem strange and I would have just dismissed it off hand, however it came from a vegetarian who just seemed so sure of himself that it baffled me.
 

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It depends on what you're comfortable with. I love seaweed, but once I bought a bag that had a couple of tiny mussel shells inside of it. That made me realize that getting this seaweed destroyed a creature's habitat. It made me feel bad, and I stopped buying that brand. I do still have seaweed occasionally, but not as much.
 

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gaianbudo;<br><br>
Well I'm sorry I did get off topic but sometimes I get upset when I see discrimination and feel I have to say something. My argument in my last post was a bit long winded but I wanted to back up what I was saying with some facts. I not going to say any more.
 

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Seaweed is great tasting and healthy for you. To by pass concerns about the harvesting methods used for commerical seaweed I simply collect my own in the tidal zones in my area. I realize that this is not possible but small companies that specialize in seaweed are probably less harmful than international ones in Asia.<br><br><br><br>
Besides the arguement that it's not vegetarian because of how it impacts the habitat is ludicrous. I would say the commerical crops of the United States have had far greater impact on the habitat of animals indigenous to this continent.
 

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Do you have any resources you can point me to about harvesting seaweed? What types to look for, how to preserve it or prepare it?
 

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Well I am only really familiar with species in my area which is Alaska so to be honest given that you are in Australia I couldn't give you exact species that you could collect. I suggest looking for a field guide for your region you can possibly find them on Amazon and make sure to collect on beaches that are not near peoples homes. Often times septic tanks will leak and contaminate the area so it's best to avoid such inhabitant areas if possible.<br><br><br><br>
You can simply sun dry seaweed or use a food dehydrator to preserve them. As for cooking with it I suggest Asian style dishes such as stir fries, soups, and anyother such preperation. Some seaweeds are stronger tasting than others so you will have to adjust according to your taste.<br><br><br><br>
P.S This is the only book on Amazon that I can find about seaweed however it is fairly pricey.<br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=veggieboards.com-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FExport-Market-Seaweeds-Other-Australia%2Fdp%2F0546012779%2Fsr%3D1-4%2Fqid%3D1170993685%2Fref%3Dsr_1_4%2F104-0112718-4726359%3Fie%3DUTF8%26s%3Dbooks" target="_blank">http://www.amazon.com/Export-Market-...e=UTF8&s=books</a>
 

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Ah.. heh. For some odd reason I thought you were from SE Asia, and a number of the species would be the same. You've inspired me to do a search and head down to the beach though. I did see a cooking show with a segment on Scottish seaweed once, it was really quite interesting.
 

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Nah I am Alaskan Native and I have been eating seaweed since I was a child. I guess seaweed is most often associated with Asian cultures however most maratime cultures probably consume seaweed on some level.
 
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