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I'm curious....does anyone know if Tobey Maguire is vegetarian for health or ethical reasons? I would assume for health reasons since he agreed to be in a movie which glorifies the horrible horse racing industry. Although, of course, maybe he might be against animals used for food but not against animals used for "entertainment".
 

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I *heard* he was vegetarian to help lose the 20lbs he had to drop for this movie. I don't know for certain.<br><br><br><br>
I like that old saying *Believe none of what you hear and only half of what you see* <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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He's been vegetarian for a long time, actually, and partly for ethical reasons. But, like many people, he doesn't follow that all the way through on a lot of things, which is why he isn't vegan, for instance.<br><br><br><br>
So many people argue that horses love to race, that I'm sure many people, even vegetarians, are convinced there's nothing wrong with it. I'd have to ask him about it, but I don't have the kind of access to him I did before Spider-Man.
 

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Money can make you change your mind about things ,too!<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D"><br><br><br><br>
But I'm not here to judge. My sister asked me the same question a couple of days ago.<br><br>
I told her that I wasn't sure why he chose to be vegetarian but at least he is offering something to the betterment of animal treatment.<br><br>
It was funny because I was so worried all throughout Spider-Man<br><br>
that he was going to eat meat. They have a scene where they were having Thanksgiving dinner and later Mary Jane asks him out for a hamburger! But Tobey prevailed!!!
 

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This is what I found that supposedly comes straight from the horse's mouth (haha)...<br><br><br><br>
Why he became a vegetarian in 1992:<br><br>
"I never really liked (red) meat in the first place," he said. "And I had a really rough time eating chicken because I would start imagining what I was eating and what kind of life the animal led and all that kind of stuff."<br><br><br><br>
I wondered this same question though. Not knowing the history of Seabiscuit, or being completely informed on how unethical horse racing is (but having heard of the horses being whipped and of course put down when they're injured during races <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/sad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":("> ) I wasn't sure what to make of it. My best guess is that he's grossed out by meat, but doesn't pay a lot of attention to animal welfare issues. Hmm, he's still better than most people though! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by Feliner</i><br><br><b>Hmm, he's still better than most people though! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)"></b></div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
Better? No, he is not better than my wife and family, thank you.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">My best guess is that he's grossed out by meat, but doesn't pay a lot of attention to animal welfare issues. Hmm, he's still better than most people though!</div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
Yes, one should appreciate "little steps" too.
 

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The horse racing industry is one of the worst industries for horses. Horses are culled soley on their ability to run. Thousands of horses are bred and born each year, only to be sent to the "killers" when they are unable to run as fast as hoped. In my business, we bought hundreds of young horses that were track rejects. The ones that we purchased were the lucky ones, most are unfit for the average ride, and are sold for horsemeat.<br><br><br><br>
Horses on the track are started for racing very young. They are not handled very well, and are basically taught to tolerate a rider and a bridle, to get into the starting gate, and to run to the left. If they don't make it, you have a young horse who has already had a lot of stress on their not fully developed bones and tendons, who is usually not handle-able (somewhat wild with no manners) and who is very "left-handed". Most of them remain somewhat left-handed for the rest of their lives, and that creates problems in training them to feel natural working, turning and developing other necessary skills to the right. I've had horses off the track that always pick up the left lead (a certain way that the horse moves at a canter, lope or run) which is OK for polo, but still and irritation and unacceptable in other sports.<br><br><br><br><br><br>
Young horses that DO make it to the track face a very short life, unless they become one of the few top earners. The stress put on their bones, joints and tendons is amplified over time. Many, MANY horses on the track are routinely "pinfired" - a caustic treatment to the forelegs - to keep them sound. Bowed tendons, bad sesmoids and other leg and foot malidies are very common with track horses. If the horse has actually had a run, few will buy them because of this. They, again, are destined for the killers.<br><br><br><br>
This is a pretty good article that stresses what I have said regarding youth and lameness issues. The Lasix article is interesting, but I recommend that you scroll down to the article titled, "Bucked Shins"<br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.toconline.com/pages/EquineHealth.html" target="_blank">http://www.toconline.com/pages/EquineHealth.html</a><br><br><br><br>
A little info on bowed tendons:<br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.leg-injuries-in-horses.com/html/search.php3/searchstring=bowed_tendons" target="_blank">http://www.leg-injuries-in-horses.co...=bowed_tendons</a><br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2003/07/24/1058853196770.html" target="_blank">http://www.theage.com.au/articles/20...853196770.html</a><br><br><br><br>
Truly great horses are then used as breeding material when they are retired. If they have severe injuries from years on the track (which the majority do), they will often be kept alive but crippled in order to collect semen from them, or to keep them pregnant.<br><br><br><br>
Keep in mind, also, that the majority of trainers are not rich, but poor. They purchase a few horses in the hopes that they will hit a jackpot. Their horses are often treated poorly as the trainers don't have the money to do what needs to be done. Additionally, trainers for other's horses can be very cruel to the horses. I have seen it over and over again.<br><br><br><br>
Horses in the wild run around a bit, and a few will race each other here and there, but, like jumping, polo, barrel racing and all the rest, we are forcing the animal into a life of performance for us and our desires. The performance of the animal raises our own egos. WE have found and trained the great horse. It is OUR glory when the horse performs up to our expectations. However, if the horse does not, it is often not RIDER ERROR, but the miserable horse who takes the blame and is moved on down the road.<br><br><br><br>
I was in this industry for nearly 25 years, and I've seen it all. Horse are the beasts of burden in our society, and there they will remain as long as we see them as slaves for our enjoyment. Never kid yourself that the horse "loves" to do what it is enslaved to do. Horses, like other creatures, love to be free and to choose their own lives.<br><br><br><br>
BTW, on a side notel Toby Mc. did feel a conflict on riding the horses and the racing industry. Most of his riding scenes were filmed on a mechanical horse.
 

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Thanks for the information Equipro. Very well written, I wanted to understand more and now I do. Unfortunately I bet the movie will just make more people want to go to the horse tracks, sigh.
 

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Well, I saw Seabiscuit this evening. If I'd known ahead of time that it was about horse racing, I wouldn't have seen it. There were parts I did enjoy, but the majority of the movie curdled the blood in my vegetarian veins. What I had been told about the movie beforehand was that it was about finding hope and perseverence during the Depression, that it was a pull-yourself-up-by-your-own-bootstraps movie. I have some critiques of the rags-to-riches storyline, but I did consent to go. It was definitely not worth the $7.75 and 2 1/2 hours. I spend most of the first half of the movie alternating between trying to figure out who the characters were and being disgusted by the poor treatment of and attitudes toward animals.
 

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I thought it was a good movie. However, there were several parts that showed cruelty and poor treatment of the horses. One part in particular was very sad, when they were going to shoot a horse with a broken leg.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/sad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":("> Luckily the trainer saves it and nurses it to health. The movie could have cut out about 2/3 of the almost an hour before Seabiscuit, the horse, comes into the movie. I had seen a documentary about Seabiscuit earlier this year and the movie stayed mostly true to fact (an announcer was added as a character and the last race was made more dramatic.)<br><br><br><br>
(BTW EquiPro- there was more than one time in the movie when Seabiscuit's loss was blamed on rider error. And why are you named EquiPro if you are so anti-horseback riding?)<br><br><br><br>
Skylark, it was about horse racing, but it was also about finding hope during a seemingly hopeless time. Seabiscuit was a short, potbellied horse who had been previously abused racing against taller, sleeker, less abused horses. His wins showed America that even "losers" can persevere. I guess Red Pollard was also supposed to be a "loser who came out on top" type character.<br><br><br><br>
Even though I did enjoy most of the movie, I agree that horse racing is an extremely cruel sport. Animals are treated like objects, beaten, and sent to slaughter if they don't meet the owners' standards. They do not deserve this abuse at all.
 

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Ntelligent, as many have already read, so I will keep it short here, I was a professional polo player (on horseback) and horse trainer and trader for over 15 years. I started doing the horse thing when I was 8, and by the time that I was 18, I was already a professional trainer and groom. When I was 22, I was the #1 ranked intercollegiate polo player in the world, male or female (I am female). When I quit playing polo, training and selling horses in 1993, I was one of the top 10 woman polo players in the world.<br><br><br><br>
I have an animal science degree and was headed for Vet school, when I decided I was unwilling to do that animal experimentation that Vet school required. I am well educated in animal production (animal husbandry, as some call it) and the use of animals to satisfy all humans lowest desires.<br><br><br><br>
My Avatar used to say, "atoning for horses". I don't know where that went.<br><br><br><br>
I believe that I was a part of the problem for 30+ years. I now prefer to be part of the solution, and I hold out my expertise in these areas to all on the Veggie boards who don't know what is what, and aren't sure about what people say. I have lived it. I have been in the middle of it. I know all about it.<br><br><br><br>
BTW, there isn't a horse sport that isn't cruel. I know of none. I tell people over and over to not fool themselves. There is nothing wonderful about the horse industry. It's all sad.
 
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