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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone know a recipe for samosas, or how i could adapt one, WITHOUT deep frying? I havent really a clue about cooking to adapt it myself, but i take it its the way the pastry sticks together.

theyd be bloody healthy otherwise. im eating one i bought atm and its good but greasy

good vegetabley snack, i guess you could put loads of different things in it for variety. Mm sweet potato samosa.
 
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don't see why you couldn't just put them in the oven... the recipe i have has a very simple basic pastry on them (flour, salt, vegetable oil) but i've also made them with a normal shortcrust pastry, with filo pastry (loads of oil, lol) and with a weird wheat free gluten free pastry (limited sucess).

they're just made with a small circle of pastry, cut in half, then the half folded into a cone, you tip some filling in, then press it sealed... its not a batter or anything, so should be fine in the oven. in fact, you can buy oven cooked/not fried ones easily where i am.

eta: i could type up my recipe/find it online if you want: its by madhur jaffery and its got potatoes, peas, onions, ginger, corriander, and lush spices in it (but i always cheat and add carrots and whatever else i feel like, lol) and its mmmmmm good.

eta2: actually, most of the time i'm too lazy to make the pastry, so i just eat the filling as a side dish- its still good!


eta3: yeah, ahem... i got a bit keen and wrote up my recipe
its attached
 

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If anyone tries baking samosas, do tell! I've been meaning to make some, but deep frying isn't really convenient, since I'm sharing a kitchen at the moment and all the pots seem to be paper thin. Maybe briefly shallow frying to crisp up the pastry a bit and then sticking them in the oven would work? Hmm...
 

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I always bake samosas, empanadas, etc., and they turn out fine. They certainly are not as crispy as fried but I tell myself they're healthier so I'm okay with it.
 

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My mom bakes them all the time. I asked her what she does, and she said she buys frozen pastry puff sheets. She boils the potatoes and then she partially mashes (but not to a smooth mash potato like consistancy) them with chopped onion and green pepper. Then she adds crushed cumin, coriander, and red pepper flakes (plus salt and pepper to taste). After the potato mixture is ready, she cuts the pastry puff sheets into squares, but doesn't separate them yet. She scoops a spoon or so of the potato mixture in between one of the squares, and folds one of the corners of the square over to make the triangular shape. To seal the edges she uses beaten up egg, but if you can find an edible substitute then I would use that. I would suggest making them in large batches because one sheet is very large so you have to use all of it after it thaws (or at least i think you do). If you make too many then you can just keep them in a plastic bag, and keep them in the freezer and cook them later. As for the cooking; preheat the oven to 450 and then cook for 15 minutes (but it all depends on the size, and you might want to try 400 degrees instead and wait until they are light brown). I personally enjoy these more than the traditional ones you can find in Indian/Pakistani specialty stores.

Edit: I just read hoodedclawjen's recipe and it sounds very good as well. I noticed she uses gurum masala and cayenne pepper in her recipe, my mom uses these all the time. If you can find them (they are always at an Indian/Pakistani store) then I would add those too. You could also try a chutney dipping sauce like mango flavor. I notice that there are only 5 or so spices commonly used in Indian cooking; garlic, ginger, coriander, cumin, and black pepper/cayenne pepper. You could use any mixture of these when cooking the somosas and I'm sure they will taste fine.
 

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I found instructions with pictures here (scroll down for the link to the actual recipe), in case anyone's interested.

The ones I used to buy had poppy seeds in the pastry. Here's the ingredient list, if someone wants to play with seasonings:

Mini vegetable samosa contains vegetables (53%) (potato, onion, peas, carrot), pastry (32%), vegetable oil, lemon juice, ginger purée, salt, garam masala, fresh coriander, sugar, chilli powder, green chilli purée, cumin seeds, black mustard seeds, ground cinnamon. Pastry contains wheat flour, water, vegetable oil, wheat dextrose, poppy seeds, salt, maize starch Garam masala contains ground coriander, ground turmeric, mustard seeds, black pepper, ground cumin, fenugreek seeds, curry leaves, chilli powder.
 

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I'm a little late, but Vegan With a Vengeance has an AWESOME baked samosa recipe with coconut-mint chutney. If you brush your normal samosas with a little canola oil they'll be almost as crispy as frying, in my experience.
 

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I just tried making a batch using yufka pastry. It browned nicely under the grill - apart from the bits that got singed because the oven I'm using doesn't work properly. Didn't taste like samosas though, pastry-wise.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pirate Ferret View Post

Does anyone know a recipe for samosas, or how i could adapt one, WITHOUT deep frying? I havent really a clue about cooking to adapt it myself, but i take it its the way the pastry sticks together.

theyd be bloody healthy otherwise. im eating one i bought atm and its good but greasy

good vegetabley snack, i guess you could put loads of different things in it for variety. Mm sweet potato samosa.
The ayurvedic restaurant I go to bakes them instead of frying them. I actually prefer them this way. Frying makes them quite oily.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I just asked my mum and we have all the ingredients in your recipe jen =D

I know what im doing tomorrow! theres loads of random veg that needs using up so there shall be some very odd samosas hehe
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snow White View Post

Maybe briefly shallow frying to crisp up the pastry a bit and then sticking them in the oven would work? Hmm...
Actually, if you shape the samosa more like a calzone (circle folded in half) they work VERY well this way. I used to make them a while back, (but I guess I sorta burned myself out on them,) and I crisped them a bit in a little oil (brushed on with a pastry brush) in a non-stick-pan, then fisnshed in the oven for a while.

Not the popular opinion evidently, but I much prefer the crispier (fried) pastry
to the baked style, which always seems tougher and drier to me.
 
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that calzone shape (in the uk we'd call it a 'pasty'- like in 'cornish pasties') sounds like a good idea!

and i agree, given the choice, i'd always pick them fried too, lol. mmm... greasy crispy goodness, lol.

i don't eat wheat anymore though, and i've really struggled (ok, i'm too lazy to experiment lots, lol) to make a w/f pastry that is flexable enough to allow deep frying, without my poor samosa fillings escaping- leaving me with a deepfrier full of totally crispified rogue peas and chunks of potato floating about, and some mangled partly dismembered greasy samosa corspes... lmao.

i'm thinking of trying that calzone style thing, or perhaps to use the samosa filling in some pakoras now... both seem promising! normally i just make the filling and eat it as a side dish, or fold it into a rice flat-bread wrap.
 

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Amy's Samosa Wraps are awfully good and easy for a student like me to just nuke and eat. I don't have a box to check out if they are vegan (i'm vegetarian) but you might want to check them out. Basically they are a wrap with a samosa's filling inside. not cheap but yummy.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tofu-N-Sprouts View Post

Actually, if you shape the samosa more like a calzone (circle folded in half) they work VERY well this way. I used to make them a while back, (but I guess I sorta burned myself out on them,) and I crisped them a bit in a little oil (brushed on with a pastry brush) in a non-stick-pan, then fisnshed in the oven for a while.

Not the popular opinion evidently, but I much prefer the crispier (fried) pastry
to the baked style, which always seems tougher and drier to me.
Thanks. Not too keen on "low fat but dry" myself
I would have experimented, but my pastry was already on the verge of tearing and I didn't think it would have survived the pan. That's what I get for being lazy and buying yufka.

Quote:
i don't eat wheat anymore though, and i've really struggled (ok, i'm too lazy to experiment lots, lol) to make a w/f pastry that is flexable enough to allow deep frying, without my poor samosa fillings escaping- leaving me with a deepfrier full of totally crispified rogue peas and chunks of potato floating about, and some mangled partly dismembered greasy samosa corspes... lmao.
How about potato bondas? The batter contains chickpea and rice flour, no wheat, but then it's not exactly what you'd call pastry.
 
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How about potato bondas? The batter contains chickpea and rice flour, no wheat, but then it's not exactly what you'd call pastry.
i'd never heard of a bonda before- i just found them on wikipedia, and they seems a little like a bhaji or pakora- but round balls, IMO making them slightly cooler than the generally mangled look of bhajis and pakoras, (mine, at least) lol. i think i might give them a go- i could smoosh my samosa filling up, and it'd probably be quite delicious! thanks!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by hoodedclawjen View Post

that calzone shape (in the uk we'd call it a 'pasty'- like in 'cornish pasties') sounds like a good idea!
I have had pasties (past-ees) as I travel a fair bit, and they are big in the upper penninsula of Michigan as well.

But pasties (paste-ees) are the bits that cover an exotic dancer's nipples in certain areas.

now toss samosa filling in with that image....
 
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I have had pasties (past-ees) as I travel a fair bit, and they are big in the upper penninsula of Michigan as well.

But pasties (paste-ees) are the bits that cover an exotic dancer's nipples in certain areas.

now toss samosa filling in with that image....
my first thought, having never seen an exotic dancer 'in the flesh', so to speak, is that covering those bits kinda defeats the point/s, doesn't it?

my second thought is that mini popadums stuck on with a bit of mango chutney would do a better job covering them than samosa mix
and it'd look a bit less like a disturbing skin disorder too.

also- i made some of those samosa mix - bonda thingies the other day, and i have to say, they were mighty tasty..... and somewhat psychadelic too
. i used purple potatoes, so they looked super groovy cool- what with the yellow batter (added a bit of tumeric for optimum yellow-ness) and purple potato, green peas and orange carrot (was a bit short of spuds) filling.

you know i'm going to have strange nightmares about finding bits of exotic dancer nipples in my samosas, now, don't you? gggrrrrrr. lol.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by hoodedclawjen View Post

you know i'm going to have strange nightmares about finding bits of exotic dancer nipples in my samosas, now, don't you? gggrrrrrr. lol.
OMG this thread has taken a hilarious turn...
 
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