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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, This may be on the edge of an iffy conversation but it really bugs me and I think it would be nice to discuss.

I live in utah, funny enough I use to be an active LDS member and never once knew their take of eating meat. When I had started talking to my friends that are still into their LDS faith I kept hearing the same thing "God put animals on this planet so we could eat them" At first I was thinking "Why do they keep saying this and how come I never heard of this when I was a member for a good 12 years?" Well personal misunderstandings aside I really am amazed how the level of ignorance certain religious people seem to be at.

I'll admit here and now that I have my own thoughts on human-animal relations which at this time I'd rather not get into here so I'm opening this up for discussion, please feel free to voice your opinions whether you're religious or not.
 

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Riot Nrrrd
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Specific to Mormons ... Here's a piece written by a Morman vegetarian: http://www.vegsource.com/articles/catano.htm\\

I don't know enough about the texts he cites to judge if his take on things is valid or not (relative to the texts) though.
 

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Riot Nrrrd
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LDS texts allow for meat consumption and set pretty clear guidelines on when it is permissible. I thought that was the case, but the guidelines are very much relaxed in practice and I couldn't find the actual words used. I got better results with my second try.
From Doctrine and Covenents section 89 verses 12 through 15:

Quote:
Yea, flesh also of beasts and of the fowls of the air, I, the Lord, have ordained for the use of man with thanksgiving; nevertheless they are to be used sparingly; And it is pleasing unto me that they should not be used, only in times of winter, or of cold, or famine.
All grain is ordained for the use of man and of beasts, to be the staff of life, not only for man but for the beasts of the field, and the fowls of heaven, and all wild animals that run or creep on the earth;
And these hath God made for the use of man only in times of famine and excess of hunger
I would think a Mormon who is not starving and eats flesh anyway would be violating this pretty clearly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Sorry, I didn't know
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave in MPLS View Post

LDS texts allow for meat consumption and set pretty clear guidelines on when it is permissible. I thought that was the case, but the guidelines are very much relaxed in practice and I couldn't find the actual words used. I got better results with my second try.
From Doctrine and Covenents section 89 verses 12 through 15:

I would think a Mormon who is not starving and eats flesh anyway would be violating this pretty clearly.
You'd think about pretty much it's "He says it's okay!" Kinda forgetting most of the context.
 

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Quote:
All grain is ordained for the use of man and of beasts, to be the staff of life, not only for man but for the beasts of the field, and the fowls of heaven, and all wild animals that run or creep on the earth;
And these hath God made for the use of man only in times of famine and excess of hunger
Is the last line reiterating the conditions under which eating animals is acceptable or is it talking about grain?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave in MPLS View Post

I would think a Mormon who is not starving and eats flesh anyway would be violating this pretty clearly.
At the very least this suggests that Mormons ought to be vegetarian in Spring and Summer, but in modern society we don't really have periods of famine so you could argue for a longer period.
 

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Riot Nrrrd
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Quote:
Is the last line reiterating the conditions under which eating animals is acceptable or is it talking about grain?
My take on it is that the clause makes the entire sentence meaningless if it is intended to modify 'grain' - how can grain be 'the staff of life' and yet be restricted to famine times? I dunno how LDS folks interpret things though. The wording doesn't use the clearest structure. Mormon texts aren't generally known for literary merit. (No offense to anyone intended)
 
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