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So, I think its time. I need a REAL rice cooker. Right now, I use a microwave one, and it has been fine for the last few years, but i am seriously considering getting rid of my microwave, so I need a rice cooker to replace this function!<br><br><br><br>
Does your rice cooker do anything else but rice? Like steaming? Do you love it? Tell me all about it! :)
 

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Back when I was doing some research on them b/c I came "this close" to buying one a while back, it appeared that the zojirushi were the best ones. But again, that's only what I found from the reviews and discussions of others.<br><br><br><br>
Others' mileage may vary.<br><br><br><br>
Sorry can't be of more help b/c I finally determined that I could do just as well with my saucepan. (I make rice constantly for both consuming with my Indian, Thai and Spanish dishes as well as for making a constant supply of rice milk.)<br><br><br><br>
There was one brand that made rice milk after it cooked it ... wish I could remember which one that was, now. Oh wait... that was a separate appliance specifically for making rice milk, only. Whoops.<br><br><br><br>
Maybe someone else can post their experiences. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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I use <a href="http://www.walgreens.com/store/product.jsp?CATID=302575&navAction=jump&navCount=0&id=prod461205" target="_blank">this</a> $10 one from Walgreens. It makes up to 3 cups of perfect rice, be it brown or white. I tried steaming broccoli in it once and it was fine. The only bad things are the rice sticks to the bottom, but 5 minutes of soaking the pot takes care of that. And the pot is aluminum, which I could do without, but for $10, I don't really care.<br><br>
HTH,<br><br>
~Wondre <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/biker.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":ymca:">
 

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We've got a Tiger from Japan. I think it was $125 about eight to ten years back. It's a fantastic unit that works well with all types of rice and it also does a good job on quinoa and grains other than rice.<br><br><br><br>
It's got a non-stick coated, removable inner container that cleans with a damp towel. We originally bought it so that we could have hot rice waiting for us after we got home from work, but we rarely use that feature these days. Getting one without a timer would have reduced the cost a lot. It holds up to 10 cups of rice, but we usually cook 4 or 5 cups so that we have leftover rice.
 

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Zojirushi NS-ZCC10 5-1/2-Cup Neuro Fuzzy Rice Cooker<br><br><br><br>
Go to amazon.com and search for the above.<br><br><br><br>
I bought this rice cooker 4 years ago. I use it almost everyday and it is amazing. It makes great brown rice.
 

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I LOVE LOVE LOVE my rice cooker!! And I LOVE LOVE LOVE the wonderful people who gave it to me...<br><br><br><br>
I have a Zojirushi rice cooker - not sure which model but it has timers and fancy settings and all the bells and whistles. (Literally - it plays all sorts of little tunes when the rice is cooked!).<br><br>
I seriously hated cooking rice until I got this cooker- never got it right - ALWAYS turned out sticky and yecchhh.<br><br><br><br>
But this thing is WONDERFUL. {{hugs rice-cooker}}<br><br><br><br>
It cooks rice, quinoa, pretty much any grain out there PERFECTLY and seriously gets used by my kids or myself almost every day.<br><br><br><br>
Probably the most valuable kitchen appliance I own.<br><br><br><br>
I'm not saying you need to run out and get the fanciest model - but do get one!!<br><br><br><br>
(In case you can't tell..) I ABSOLUTELY think a rice cooker is one of the best investments a person could ever get for their kitchen!!
 

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I love my Zojirushi NH-VBC18!! I got this model because it has a GABA brown rice function. It cooks with some kind of heat induction so the grains are cooked perfectly evenly. No bottom of the pot sticking. The stay warm function is amazing. You can keep your rice or grains warm all day, and they are not overcooked. It cooks my brown rice to perfection and other grains. The GABA function is the one I use the most. Also, it never, ever sticks, but that is due to the teflon coating (this is the only thing about it I do not like, but they don't offer a stainless steel option for the cooking pan). It is expensive, but it is a great appliance that I love.
 

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Does anyone know if steaming rice in a rice basket is comparable to having a rice cooker? I want a rice steamer/basket and a rice cooker and was wondering if I could get away with just the rice steamer/basket.
 

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Zojirushi tends to make the best fancy rice cookers (fuzzy logic models). National tends to make the best basic rice cookers.
 

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"Does anyone know if steaming rice in a rice basket is comparable to having a rice cooker? "<br><br><br><br>
The simplest and best way to cook rice is in an ordinary stainless steel pot with a lid. A high quality 3-quart Chinese-made or Korean-made stainless pot with a triple-ply bottom (stainless on the food contact surface, a layer of aluminum or copper for good, even, low-loss, heat conduction, and a third layer of stainless to protect your counter tops from aluminum or copper particles) can be bought for about $15 or $20. You can use it to steam vegetables and steam rice. Of course if you want to do both at once, you will need two.<br><br><br><br>
Just put the rice in the pot and add twice as much water by volume. Cover. As soon as the water boils vigorously, turn down the heat so that the water just barely simmers (this is tricky and time-consuming with an electric stove, but there are ways to do it, tho they are complicated to explain). Then continue cook, covered, for the amount of time needed for that particular type of rice. That is all you need to do.<br><br><br><br>
With gas range, turning down the heat is easy. You turn it down and it goes down. With electric, the burner remains hot even tho you've turned the knob down. So what you do is start with slightly less water than you need. When the water boils, turn down the knob, and add the rest of the (cold) water. Plan the amount of water so that the cold water will compensate for the time that it takes for the burner to cool down sufficiently. You will have to estimate how much water you need. If you don't get the heat down rapidly, you will over-mix your rice and it will be a mess, and you will run out of water before the rice is cooked because it boils away too fast. I recommend using a gas burner. You need to get that water down to a very slow simmer, within about 30 seconds after it starts to boil rapidly.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>soilman</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br><br>
The simplest and best way to cook rice is...</div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
I think it depends on personal preference.<br><br><br><br>
My preference? I think you can't beat a rice cooker for speed, simplicity and ease; and a bajillion Asian restaurants in my town can't be wrong... (they all use rice cookers).<br><br><br><br>
1.) Pour in rice and water.<br><br>
2.) Push button.<br><br><br><br>
Return 20 min (or whatever time your particular grain takes) later to perfectly done rice.<br><br><br><br>
Every time.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/notworthy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":wayne:"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/notworthy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":wayne:"><br><br><br><br>
No watching the stove, turning the flame down, setting timers, having over- or under-done rice, scrubbing stuck-on-rice out of the pot...
 

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"1.) Pour in rice and water.<br><br>
2.) Push button."<br><br><br><br>
Same thing if you have a pot with a cover and a gas range with a timer. Pour in rice and water, turn up the gas until the water boils, then turn the flame down as low as it will go. I would say measure, but for myself, I can estimate the right amount of rice and water without measuring. Then set the timer on the gas burner to shut it off after 20 minutes. If you don't have a timed range burner, you can use a timer that rings and reminds you to turn off the flame manually. You don't need duplicate, space-wasting, equipment. The pot with cover can be used for all kinds of things, not just rice. Plus the rice and water is in contact only with stainless steel; it does not contact some kind of unnamed plastic resin with possibly toxic chemical constitutents that could get into the rice. It is easiest to clean: you soak the whole thing, the pot and the cover, in water or put them in the dishwasher.<br><br><br><br>
I hate to do things using complicated, specialty tools when there are simpler tools that do the same thing. Plus if you have gas range you are using less energy to cook the rice, and paying less for the energy. Auto rice cookers generally use an electric heating element.<br><br><br><br>
Rice never ever gets stuck to the stainless pot. You just set the gas range to turn off after the correct number of minutes. Or you mind the timer. It isn't that big a deal to remember to turn off the flame. Cleaning the pot is just a matter of filling it with warm water and a tiny dash of dish liquid, then letting it sit for 10 minutes. Then everything comes off easily with a soft cloth or you could use a small brush or monofilament-resin scrubber but a soft cloth will be sufficient.<br><br><br><br>
My rice comes out perfect every time without the additional expense of dedicated equipment. There is nothing difficult about cooking rice. It is just a matter of using the right amount of rice and water and the right size flame under the pot. It isn't like making bread, where a bread machine saves lots of work. A rice cooker hardly saves any work, if it saves any at all. Given the fact the the heating element gets dirty, but can't be soaked or put in the dishwasher, the rice cooker is actually more work to use than a pot, because cleaning it is more work, even tho the actual cooking is a tiny bit less work (the flame turns down, and then off, automatically -- that is the only thing it does that a pot and gas-burner doesn't do). A bread machine on the other hand, saves work, and frees you from having to pay attention to various occurences. But the procedure and amount of work and attention required when using a rice cooker is very nearly the same as that for using a pot.
 

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I love my rice cooker. It makes rice so much better than I ever could on the stovetop. Plus, I make more brown rice now than before I had a rice cooker. The convenience, deliciousness, and health benefits greatly outweigh the pennies saved by cooking the rice on the stove, which I'd never do if I didn't have the rice cooker.
 

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"The convenience, deliciousness, and health benefits greatly outweigh the pennies saved by cooking the rice on the stove, which I'd never do if I didn't have the rice cooker."<br><br><br><br>
Rice cooked in a rice cooker tastes exactly the same as that cooked in a stainless pot. There is no way a rice cooker could possibly make rice any better than the way I make it on the stove-top. It takes a bit longer with a rice cooker. There are no health advantages to either method. The stove method is more convenient, as cleanup is easier. With an auto-shut-off gas or electric range, there is no difference whatsoever in the steps you have to take to cook the rice. If the range doesn't have an auto-shut off feature, it is must a matter of shutting it off at the right time. Not exactly a difficult chore. You could even skip the part about using high heat until the water boils and then turning the heat down low. You can leave the flame on low the whole time. You'd just have to wait a bit longer, this way, for the rice to cook. Once you have made rice once, and know how long it takes for a given amount of rice and water to reach boiling, then, with an auto-shut-off range you can do the whole job unattended. You just put the rice and water in the pot and turn on the range timer.
 

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1. It's much more convenient. Just add the ingredients and hit the button. It turns off by itself when the rice is done so I don't have to worry about it burning. My range doesn't have a timer.<br><br>
2. It's much more delicious than any rice I've ever made on the stove.<br><br>
3. I'd never eat brown rice if I didn't have my rice cooker, so there are added health benefits to having a rice cooker.<br><br><br><br>
Cleanup is about the same. I have to wash the liner and the lid.
 

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I'm with ~Wonder on this one. (Well, OK, I usually agree with him, but anyway...)<br><br><br><br>
It DOES taste different in a rice cooker. You won't convince me otherwise, don't even try.<br><br>
I don't have a timer on my range. (I don't know anyone who does.)<br><br>
My rice cooker uses far less electricity than heating up the burner on an electric range.<br><br>
I cooked rice for 25 years in a pot on the stove (and REALLY tried to do it "right") I consider myself a pretty good cook but evidently not with rice - it never turned out and we hated it EVERY time. (big waste).<br><br>
My entire family LOVES rice (and all sorts of other grains as well) now and we all eat a whole lot more whole grains because of my rice cooker. (That's not a bad thing).<br><br><br><br>
Say what you want but I won't ever be convinced to go back to the stovetop method.
 

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I am of the opinion that you don't need a fancy one - they are fancy, but I don't see the need. We received one as a gift. At first I thought "really? a whole separate appliance *just* for rice?" But seriously, it's amazing. As a result, we cook rice WAY more often.. But I do think that the 10$ ones will do the trick as well as the 200$ ones. Just less fancy, and no digital timers, etc.
 

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Thanks TNS! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/kiss.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":kiss:"><br><br><br><br>
nookle, I got mine for $10 at walgreens, it has one button that you push when you want it to cook. It makes awesome rice. I use it several times a week, usually to make brown rice. I <3 fiber.<br><br>
~Wondre <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/biker.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":ymca:">
 

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Some have teflon-coated aluminum bowls. Cheaper ones have plain plastic bowls, with plastic in contact with your rice and water. On the cheaper models, you cannot immerse the bowl because it does not separate from electric heating element. It is s one-piece unit. That makes them a real pain in the buttocks to clean, which completely makes up in inconvenience, for the dubious convenience of shutting off the heating element automatically after a set amount of time. With teflon-coated aluminum, when the teflon wears thru, you have your food in contact with aluminum, which may well be toxic and is certainly putting metal having more toxicity, into your food, than stainless steel cookware puts into your food.<br><br><br><br>
"My rice cooker uses far less electricity than heating up the burner on an electric range."<br><br><br><br>
Oh dear. Wrong. (1) The burner on an electric range uses electricity slightly more efficiently because it is getting 240 volts instead of the 120 on a plug-in rice cooker (US voltages) and therefore less heat is lost in heating up the wiring on the way to and from the burner. (2) While the electric range element is <i>capable</i> of using more electricity - and getting hotter - than the rice cooker heating element, in actual practice, since you cook rice at the lowest end of the range element's heat-range, the electric range uses a bit <b>less</b> electricty per the same amount of rice and water, cooked for the same amount of time. Also, because they heat the water up more slowly, rice takes a bit longer to cook, overall, in a rice cooker, than it does on a range element - which does the initial bringing up of the water to an almost-boil rather faster - and probably a bit more efficiently, since there is less time for heat to be drawn away by the sides of the pot, instead of being absorbed by the water and rice <i>in</i> the pot.<br><br><br><br>
The wattage number given for the element is the maximum wattage. However the electric range is operating very near the low end of its range, and is using much less wattage than its maximum rated wattage. In other words, even tho the rice cooker is labeled at say about 600 watts and the electric range burner is labeled at 2000 watts, they are both operating at about the same wattage when cooking rice. Turned down, toward the low end, the electric range is consuming only 500 watts, not the 2000 watts that it consumes at "high." Same amount of watts as the rice cooker.
 

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"I cooked rice for 25 years in a pot on the stove (and REALLY tried to do it "right") I consider myself a pretty good cook but evidently not with rice - it never turned out and we hated it EVERY time. (big waste)."<br><br><br><br>
You obviously never did it right. What did you do, boil the rice at a fast boil and stir it after the water reached cooking temperature, and use way too little or way too much water? That's how people ruin rice. You have to simply cook it at the barest simmer. Once the water reaches cooking temperature, you have to <i>not stir</i> your rice-water mixture. You have to simply measure 2 times as much water as rice, by volume. This will differ slightly for different rice. If you insist on stirring the rice after it has cooked for 10 minutes, or insist on cooking it at too high a temperature, you are going to ruin it. And you are going to make cleanup difficult.
 
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