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This features testimony from different parents about how they raised their children vegan and what they typically eat- complete with adorable pics!<br><br><a href="http://www.veganhealth.org/articles/realveganchildren" target="_blank">http://www.veganhealth.org/articles/realveganchildren</a>
 

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Sasha's story is my favorite!<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Having been raised vegan since birth, I admit, was not easy. Although I couldn't complain about the food, because mom was (and still is) a fabulous cook, it was clear to me that I was different from the other kids. Whenever a kid in my class had a birthday, my mom would provide the teacher with a goodie bag just for me so I could enjoy a healthy lollipop or a homemade vegan brownie while the other students noshed on their chocolate chip cupcakes that were dripping with hydrogenated oil. School pizza parties were another hassle, but mom would patiently call the teacher and ask "Will the pizza be cut into squares or triangles?" and she would cut mine the same way.<br><br>
There were always the same old questions: "Why can't you eat meat?" "No dairy or eggs, either? WHAT DO YOU EAT?!" As I was growing up, I found that I could no longer answer with the kindergarten response mom taught me as a little girl: "Animals are my friends and I don't want to eat my friends." That's all very cutesy and good enough to shut up other 5 year olds, but it doesn't cut it when you're in sixth grade!<br><br>
I was running out of intelligent responses and by the time I was in 8th grade, I was completely stumped. The truth is, mom had always been my "mouthpiece," having given me all the answers and retorts to say whenever the questions arose. However, as a rebellious teenager who refused to do anything her mom told her to (well, it's true for all teenagers, isn't it?), I wanted to find my own answers. I started researching by reading books about teenage vegetarianism that my mom collects in her library of vegetarian/vegan books. I read some articles by John Robbins, and listened to Diet for a New America on tape. I became a member of The Physician's Coimmittee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) and donated money to them for my Bat Mitzvah. Slowly, I began to truly understand why vegetarianism and veganism were so important, not for my mom's sake, but for my own.<br>
\t \t<br>
Sasha at 16<br><br>
At 17, I now embrace being different and love the vegan lifestyle. It is so amazing to see the progress that vegetarianism and veganism has made throughout the years, and I want to be a part of it. I am co-president of the Environmental Club at school, SoCo-Eco, for South County Secondary School. When I was in 9th and 10th grades, I organized The Great American Meatout, so that other students could learn about the vegetarian and vegan cultures. As a Junior in high school this year, I plan to host the Meatout for the third time. There are so many disgruntled teenagers who are eager to break out of their meat-eating habits for their health, or to save the life of a cow, yet they have no idea where to begin. I know this because I get emails from teens who are struggling to convince their parents that they will not die from malnutrition if they give up animal protein.<br><br>
By spreading awareness about the many things one can do (and eat) as a vegetarian or vegan, these kids will be relieved to know that they are not alone in wanting to be healthy while at the same time help the environment and treat animals with kindness and respect. I'm proud to be able to say that I've never eaten meat, poultry, fish, eggs, dairy, or honey in my life, and I don't feel deprived at all!</div>
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Awww, that is adorable <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smitten.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":smitten:">
 
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