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So my nutrition teacher (wouldn't have chosen nutrition, but it was the only one open) was lecturing us about protein and said that she is trying to limit how much soy she eats because there is some controversy about it? I'm really confused - what's so bad about soy? Should I listen to this?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by veggiegurl305 View Post

So my nutrition teacher (wouldn't have chosen nutrition, but it was the only one open) was lecturing us about protein and said that she is trying to limit how much soy she eats because there is some controversy about it? I'm really confused - what's so bad about soy? Should I listen to this?
Nope..your teacher is really confused.

Let's go to the big wall of science and see what actual nutrition studies say.

Dr. Norris, can we use your stuff? Yes? Good.

^ The conclusion of that REALLY long list of studies, in case you're not interested in reading it all, is that the anti soy argument is exaggerated beyond all reason. In some cases soy may be associated with a very slight increased risk of something, but it's always more than balanced out by the positive effects. If I knew the specifics of what your teacher thinks Soy does I'm sure we could find that exact part on Jack's site, or write him an email and ask him about it - but I get the impression your teacher is just riding the anti Soy wave.
 

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There was a study on a Hawaiian population of Japanese American couples that correlated tofu consumption positively with increased rates of dementia. There are also conflicting studies on what the estrogen-like chemicals in it do in relation to male hormones and women with breast cancer. Soy is not the only food that has phytoestrogens. Some people speculate that plants evolved them to make animals that eat them reproduce less. Their effect on reproduction is not well established at this time though, so that speculation doesn't really mean anything. Flax also has a lot of phytoestrogens if I recall correctly, as well as legumes and nuts, but not to the extent of soy.
 
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