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Herbivorous Urchin
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Is there a difference other than the nutrients that were killed during cooking, and is it really that big of a leap?
 

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Well, I think I would add that during the cooking process, most of the natural enzymes in the food are killed, which would have allowed the food to break down more easily in your body. When these enzymes are destroyed under high temperatures, your body must use it own enzymes to break the food down, thus forcing your body to work harder to digest the foodstuffs. This may be why many people report feeling lighter and more energetic after eating a raw meal - No more heaviness, or at least less than before. (Extreme example - after Thanksgiving dinner.)

Additionally, many of us veg*ns report feeling lighter after removing flesh from our diets - this is in part because meat is one of the most difficult foods to digest, much more difficult than grains, much much more difficult than vegetables, and much much much more difficult than fruits.

Therefore, the less energy our bodies spends digesting food, the more energetic we'll feel, hence the arguement to eat more foods wth their natural enzymes still intact (i.e., raw foods).
 

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All I know is that I feel better when I eat raw. I'm not a raw vegan, but I am a lazy one. So sometimes cooking just doesn't happen, and I'll eat salads or whole fruits and veggies.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by River View Post

Is there a difference other than the nutrients that were killed during cooking, and is it really that big of a leap?
Most foods have more nutrients when they are eaten raw than when they are cooked. And even when foods are cooked, they often tend to have more nutrients when they are just lightly steamed or stir-fried than when they're boiled or baked. In general, the more something is heated, the more nutrients are lost. And when foods are re-heated, they are often much lower than they were the first time they were heated.

However, some foods cannot be eaten raw. Some foods must be cooked in order to destroy the natural toxins (potatoes, kidney beans, etc.) and other things must be cooked in order to destroy biological contaminants like bacteria (meat). And some foods are just easier to digest when they have been cooked.

Personally, I think a diet that contains both cooked foods and raw foods is the healthiest option so long as all raw foods are thoroughly cleaned and so long as all cooked foods are vegan
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peaceful One View Post

Well, I think I would add that during the cooking process, most of the natural enzymes in the food are killed, which would have allowed the food to break down more easily in your body. When these enzymes are destroyed under high temperatures, your body must use it own enzymes to break the food down, thus forcing your body to work harder to digest the foodstuffs. This may be why many people report feeling lighter and more energetic after eating a raw meal - No more heaviness, or at least less than before. (Extreme example - after Thanksgiving dinner.)

Additionally, many of us veg*ns report feeling lighter after removing flesh from our diets - this is in part because meat is one of the most difficult foods to digest, much more difficult than grains, much much more difficult than vegetables, and much much much more difficult than fruits.

Therefore, the less energy our bodies spends digesting food, the more energetic we'll feel, hence the arguement to eat more foods wth their natural enzymes still intact (i.e., raw foods).
Enzymes aren't alive so they can't be killed. Anyways, even when you eat raw food the enzymes are "killed" by your stomach ph anyways so it doesn't really matter.
 

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Over the past month I've eaten about 6 raw corn on the cobs and noticed that I'm digesting them as opposed to a few years ago when I noticed that cooked corn on the cob seemed to pass thru me undigested. So either my gut flora has gotten better by eating more raw (between 20 and 80 percent most days) or uncooked corn is easier to digest. I don't know which is true or maybe both are true, I haven't tried to figure it out, it doesn't really matter to me, heck it tasted so good that I'm also wondering is my taste buds have gotten better too.

I realized this may all be 'more info than you've wanted to know' but the digestibility of the corn does seem like good info somehow.
Happy summer, Gil
 
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