VeggieBoards banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
216 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone have advice on growing raspberries in a high-desert environment? I have ordered 12 plants from Gurneys and will be planting them on an east-facing slope. The soil is (well, was) a combination of sand and heavy clay. The PH is dead-on neutral, but nutrients were non-existant. Over the past year, I've mixed straw, peat moss and manure into the area they'll be planted in, and will be adding a couple buckets of commercial compost just before planting.<br><br><br><br>
So, how far about should they be planted? How often do they need to be watered, and how heavily? Do they need mulching? Are you supposed to cut the canes each year (I read this somewhere, but don't get it, since the wild raspberries I'm familiar with obviously don't get cut annually)?<br><br><br><br>
Any comments or other advice would be greatly appreciated!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,049 Posts
kachina, wherebouts do you live?<br><br><br><br>
I've been reading up a bit on raspberries since my sweetie was talking about planting some in his backyard (he's in albuquerque, which I think is also "high desert" - correct?).<br><br><br><br>
They do need to be watered frequently during the first year or so - or at least kept damp - not allowed to get bone dry anyway. After that I'm a little ore unclear, as there seem to be varying opinions...<br><br><br><br>
You'll have better yield if you cut the canes back every winter - and less chance of insect problems - the domestic raspberries are more suseptible to rot and insects than wild ones. I'm not exactly sure how to do that though, still reading! Mulching over the winter - yes - I am not sure about otherwise... I would think to help keep moisture in the soil it would be a good idea though?<br><br><br><br>
It's actually hard to find reliable info. about growing them in high-desert areas - a lot of it directly contradicts other information I've found, so... I'm still reading <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
Good luck and let me know how yours turn out, I'd love to know!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
216 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks! I'm about 4 hours from Albuquerque. We're a little colder (zone 5) because we're at 6000 ft. Basically the same environment though. Thanks for the info on cutting ... I'm guessing a lawnmower or heavy-duty weedwhacker would do the trick (or failing that, a scythe!).<br><br><br><br>
I'll report back on our success -- or lack thereof! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Many kinds of raspberries only bear on stems two year old or older. So if you cut them back every year, you'll never get raspberries. I think you can increase production by cutting out older stems (they don't bear as well when three or four years old).<br><br><br><br>
Other kinds only bear on new growth, so cutting them completely back gets you the maximum number of raspberries. The nursery you bought your plants from should be able to tell you which kind you have.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top