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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First has anyone read the book? Or used the recipes? Many sound SUPER easy and super tasty.

Next, my question is this. She says it's "Raw Vegan" but almost every recipe calls for the use of honey. (she does explain how to get it Raw, but I'm pretty sure most vegan's don't eat honey right?)

What would you use as the "binder" or sweetener in it's place?

My father in law raises bees so I could get local fresh honey (I'm also not vegan, yet) but it sure wouldn't be raw...
 

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No you're right, honey isn't vegan. Some raw restaurants advertise their menu as vegan, but include honey.

The honey you could get locally would be raw, as long as the beekeeper doesn't boil it and filter it before he lets you have it. Agave nectar is the popular choice as a honey sub, but it is never raw, even if it says so on the label. It's just easiest to get raw honey, for those who are so dogmatic that everything they eat must be absolutely 100% raw.

If you want to try to be vegan, you might be able to get raw date sugar, and add enough water to it to make a syrup, or, you could puree dates in the blender. Just be sure to remove the pits. They are plenty sticky enough to be a good binder. Even raw evaporated cane juice could be made into a syrup by moistening it with a bit of water.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Wonderful thank you!
 

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This is probably a stupid question, but why not use sugar?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Not a stupid question, I'm not sure.. Someone with more knowledge?
 

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Oh well most standard sugars on the market are not raw. You'd want raw sugar or evaporated cane juice. Even salt is not raw, but baked in kilns. That's why they like certain kinds of celtic sea salt that are not baked, or salts that are mined and milled without using high heat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Is the Himalayan pink salt raw? I see that or Celtic salt mentioned a lot...

As for the sugar that makes sense..
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by shortstack View Post

Is the Himalayan pink salt raw?
I think it is supposed to be. It's probably something you would have to confirm with the company though. "Raw" doesn't really have a legal definition when it comes to food labels, and I have seen things like "raw" cashews for sale, when cashews are never raw, but must be treated with boiling water in order to be edible, and "raw" agave nectar, which is also never really raw.
 

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Ah, of course. Thanks for the info.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SomebodyElse View Post

Agave nectar is the popular choice as a honey sub, but it is never raw, even if it says so on the label.
So these guys are lying?

Quote:

"Raw Ohgave! has a mild, light, almost neutral flavor with a subtle aroma. This form is produced at temperatures below 118 degrees and retains additional health-enhancing enzymes. It is a perfect sweetener for raw foodists and natural enthusiasts alike."
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrs. T View Post

So these guys are lying?

Quote:

"Raw Ohgave! has a mild, light, almost neutral flavor with a subtle aroma. This form is produced at temperatures below 118 degrees and retains additional health-enhancing enzymes. It is a perfect sweetener for raw foodists and natural enthusiasts alike."
I don't think going to extremes matters. Like if 98% of your diet is raw and the only things that aren't technically raw are agave nectar, nutritional yeast, and maple syrup...then who cares? You're already eating a super healthy diet.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrs. T View Post

So these guys are lying?

Quote:

"Raw Ohgave! has a mild, light, almost neutral flavor with a subtle aroma. This form is produced at temperatures below 118 degrees and retains additional health-enhancing enzymes. It is a perfect sweetener for raw foodists and natural enthusiasts alike."
I don't know, but I pity da foo who believes everything that people who want their money tell them.
 

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I am saddened to hear that my "raw" agave nectar may not be raw. But I am skeptical. Any way you could prove to me the items you mention are not raw? I can't just go around believing everyone about everything at face value, y'know. Mostly wondering how you know it's not raw.
 

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Hi, I have the same book, and I believe she says to use agave in place of honey for any recipe on page 22.
I use agave, you just have to get the dark kind that says "raw" on it. It's not as healthy as honey, but it's more ethical
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by t0mmy View Post

I am saddened to hear that my "raw" agave nectar may not be raw. But I am skeptical. Any way you could prove to me the items you mention are not raw? I can't just go around believing everyone about everything at face value, y'know. Mostly wondering how you know it's not raw.
Well I really don't care whether people believe me or not. But you can do it the hard way, by reading every book on raw food you can get your hands on, and watching lots of YouTube videos by people on raw foods, or you can use common sense, and ask yourself what usually happens to any raw plant derived liquid that you put in a bottle and leave out at room temperature for weeks.

Bottom line: if it is on a shelf in your supermarket, it has either been heat pasteurized or irradiated, or it'll ferment and blow up the container.
 

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Organic foods are not irradiated where I live (and I hope this is the case everywhere). But if it is labeled "raw" that should mean it is not heated (which includes pasteurization).
Maybe it's not raw, but if it says raw I'm a little bit more inclined to believe it is.
 
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