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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After a year of having a feline companion, my allergies finally got the best of me. After trying various medications (both prescription and naturopathic, and now that I no longer have medical insurance, it's very costly) that made me feel gross, frequent bathing and that stuff you rub on their fur to make them non-allergenic (she hated me for that), vacuuming/dusting daily and shampooing the carpet monthly, I finally gave up. I found her an AWESOME home...I gave her to the mother of a friend of mine and she absolutely LOVES it at their house (and probably loves not being bathed every week and having that crap rubbed on her fur). This woman's home is very peaceful, which is a perfect fit for my good ol' Susie. I know its my own stupid fault for adopting a cat when I knew that I was allergic. I would get a little sneezy every once in a while when around a cat, but I never thought it would get this bad. I thought that since I would be constantly exposed to an allergen, it would stop bothering me eventually. In the few months prior to finding a new home for her, I couldn't even pick her up (which was something she loved) without having an attack of sneezes and swollen eyes. It broke my heart to have to push my furry princess off my lap whenever she hopped up, wanting to cuddle. She started to hide in the corner under the furniture in the living room and wouldn't even come out to greet me. She's been in her new home for over a month now, and she's doing great.

Now I'm left with this immense feeling of guilt and a broken heart. This is the same cat that laid in bed with me after my wrist surgery, licking my bandages and showering me with kisses, and not leaving my side for the entire two weeks I was at home recovering (except to eat, etc). The same cat who would shower me with kitty kisses everytime I had a bad day. I've been diagnosed with depression, and she was the best medicine.

I needed to vent. Thank you for reading this.

I eventually want to adopt another animal...it's like I have a void that only a companion animal can fill. But I'm scared. Obviously, cats are out of the question and I had a bad experience involving a chocolate lab and a very severe case of separation anxiety that stemmed from the neglect he received prior to coming into my home (I think I posted about it here - do a search if you're curious). It looks like I'll be living in apartment - type residences for quite sometime, and I refuse to force a lab to live in a setting like that. Plus, I'm dealing with several injuries that would prevent me from providing the amount of activity that a high-energy dog would need (anything other than taking walks throughout the day would be out of the question). I have been around labs my entire life, so I do not know much about other breeds. It'll be a quite sometime before I'm ready for another companion animal.

Any suggestions about breeds of dogs that adapt easily to apartment living and would be happy with the level of activity that I can provide? Like I said before, it'll be quite sometime before I adopt another animal...not only am I not emotionally ready for another animal, I want to do some research, save up extra cash, etc.
 

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I agree with you that it's best to wait a while until you're emotionally ready. A lot of people make the mistake of getting a new dog when they're still grieving the loss of their last pet, or when they have other high emotional or high stress circumstances going on (such as having a new child, moving into a new apartment, or any other type of lifestyle changes). This puts the dog into an awkward situation with an unstable leader. So, wait until all that settles down first.

It sounds like you have realistic expectations about what you're able to provide and what energy-level will be a good match for your lifestyle. One thing to know is that the size of the dog does not always coorespond to the energy level of the dog. A high energy small dog would be bored out of it's mind in an apartment without lots of stimulation and walks. Whereas a large couch-potato dog would be fine just lounging around. My foster dog Perry is a rottwieler mix who would be perfect for apartment living.

Here's a link that lists dogs which would be good in apartments: http://www.canismajor.com/dog/apart.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the link! I haven't heard of some of the breeds listed, but I plan on doing some research. My boyfriend has talked about how much he likes english bulldogs, but you don't see very many of those available for adoption. I've also heard that they do not do well in hot climates...and we just happen to live in the desert. :/ There's talk of buying a house with a yard by the end of next year, but I'll believe that when I see it.

I saw Pet Refuge's website...Perry does look like a couch potato! That's awesome! His picture immediately reminded me of the rottweiler mix that my family has. My parents have had her for the past 13 years, and she is just as sweet as can be! She is the perfect couch potato dog
 

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Good link but Im amazed that they havent listed the couch potatoe of the canine world! GREYHOUNDS! A retired greyhound would be fine in an apartment (once they get used to stairs). A couple of 20 min walks a day and a couch to sleep on and they are happy. Beautiful dogs, very gentle and very loving and thousands of them needing homes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by lurcherloon View Post

Good link but Im amazed that they havent listed the couch potatoe of the canine world! GREYHOUNDS! A retired greyhound would be fine in an apartment (once they get used to stairs). A couple of 20 min walks a day and a couch to sleep on and they are happy. Beautiful dogs, very gentle and very loving and thousands of them needing homes.
Its funny that you mentioned greyhounds. Just last night, one of my friends was telling me all about greyhounds and how they make great couch potatoes
We live in Las Vegas right now, and I found out that there are SEVERAL greyhound rescue organizations right here in our city.

When my boyfriend and I were talking about dogs last night, he mentioned english bulldogs again and I told him that it would be rather difficult to find one unless we go through a english bulldog rescue. He said "oh, well I know a breeder..."

(....we haven't had the talk about how its much better to adopt a rescue animal than it is to buy from a breeder. I'm thinking about signing the both of us up to volunteer at an animal shelter so he can see first hand.)
 

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I have no idea why Beagles are on the list for low to moderate energy dogs suitable for apartment living. I've owned two Beagles and they both had (and the one I still own, still does) have tons of energy. Theres nobody home in the day (from around 6:30am to 2pm - 3pm) so once I get home hes bouncing off the walls. He also LOVES to run as fast as he can outside. Our house is big enough to play chase and he is able to run and get a ball inside also. Not to mention the howling.... I can hear him howl from outside my house, this also was true for the other Beagle I owned.

I can't imagine a Beagle being happy in an apartment... When left alone for a long time, he can become destructive too, (once again like my previous Beagle). When he gets bored (even with toys we leave out) he likes to find paper to chew, and chews on the tips of the carpet, and he has a weird obsession with Q-tips. ;P When talking to other Beagle owners in the past, their Beagles sounded pretty similar.

My Golden Retriever is very lazy, started getting lazy at about 5 or 6, when she was little she was a lot more playful. Now when we play she gets tired before I do, she is old now though (10) Shes so cuddly though. :)

I'm very sorry you had to give up your cat, although it was the best for both of you. :) I also wanted a cat, and still do, but like you, am horribly allergic, so its out of the question.

Good luck on your search for a dog. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yeah, I thought it was rather weird that beagles were on the list. I've never had one myself, but I've met a few that were quite rambunctous. (I think I spelled that right)

I really like the idea of adopting a retired greyhound. I know that my boyfriend will want a puppy, but I don't like the idea of raising one in an apartment. It's different when you own a house and don't have to worry about pissing off a landlord because your new puppy peed on the carpet, chewed stuff up, etc.
 

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If you can afford it, two dogs to keep each other company and play together. Then you can choose one dog and your boyfriend can choose the other one.

I hear bulldogs have trouble giving birth and need C sections. This may be why it harder to find them and less are in rescue.

How about a french bulldog?.

I would say pomeranian or papilion SP?, but you said hot climate and both are long hairred so not so sure about. Two people on my pennysaver route have poms, one has a small fenced yard and other three are living in an appartment situation and bark when I come to the door.

Jack russel terrier?. These are small dogs that were bred to hunt rats in the old days. I've met a few of them. There's one down the road that sometimes "lives" in a store.

I see eskies listed on the low energy list and I'd put them in the middle energy list. I used to have an eskie. Not that it matter for your case since I would not recomend an eskie for a hot climate anyways.

Good luck finding your dog.
 

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Beagles and jack russel terriers are high energy. Any bulldog up for adoption may have been surrendered due to problems. I really encourage you to check out retired greyhounds. They are very low energy in the house and there are tons needing adoption that will be happy with just daily walks. Also they are more catlike than any other dog I've ever had. They sleep almost all the time, clean themselves, and love their peopl
 

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A retired greyhound would be a fantastic option!

I also have to put in a good word for small-breed dogs, though. ;D I have a Bichon-Shih Tzu cross, who is an absolute saint and doesn't need a heck of a lot of exercise. Some small breeds (I'd be wary of terrier breeds and POODLES in particular) are extremely high-energy, so don't let their size decieve you, but if kept clipped dogs like my girl fare fine in any climate, are easily housebroken and very people-friendly, and great companions.
We do a bit of agility with Hope and take her for regular walks, and that keeps her more than happy to lie quietly around the house.

To add to what nerorleansmama mentioned, perhaps a Basenji could be an option if there is a breeder in your area? They are EXTREMELY catlike, which would likely really appeal to you, and perfect for a hot climate. They tend to be very people-oriented and friendly, as well.


Good luck!
 

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I agree that a retired greyhound would be great for you IF you have a large appartment. Although they are very lazy, and do well on regular walks (although preferably with some "off lead" time to run), they are generally very large, and can easily take up an entire sofa's worth of space by sprawling out over the floor. Plus if the situation there is anything like in the UK, there are TONS of them about.

Am very dubious about that list of potentially suitable appartment dogs (particularly the collie, huskie and cockerspaniel entries, but that leads me to believe there may be other unsuitable breeds on there which I have had less experience with).

It might be worth looking into the terrier route. We used to get loads of terriers in, and often they had problems with agression or barking. If youre experienced perhaps you could work round agression, but obviously you would need to not take anything with a history of barking if you live in an appartment.
 

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I knew some people who had greyhounds. They lived in a big house, not much of a yard and were taken on walks. I do recall them being laid back, calm and with a pleasant temperment. They tended to lie in their wierd greyhound ways (greyhounds can't really sit like other dogs) next to people. I was surprised how lazy they were for being built to race.

I guess this helps when they get crated up.

I recall something very strange happened after one of the dogs died. The other one flipped out and became extremely fearful of people.
 

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Aww, I'm sorry you had to give up your kitty.
I know how heartbreaking that can be...

As far as apartment-compatible dogs, I second everyone's suggestion of a greyhound...my aunt had one for many years and she was just the biggest couch potato.
Loved everyone, was very quiet, didn't need a lot of exercise. Several things to keep in mind with them, though...you will need to buy a raised feeding system. They, along w/ several other large-breed dogs, are very susceptible to bloat and cannot be fed on the floor. If you have hardwood floors, you'll need to invest in several large dog beds to scatter around the house so the dog isn't forced to lay on the hard floor. And you need a special collar/martingale to walk them...can't use regular collars because their heads are smaller than their necks.
Other breeds I would imagine would be good are great danes (no, really...most of them are not too energetic, but they take up the entire couch/bed!), cocker spaniels, chihuahuas, most toy breeds.

I did have a suggestion about cats, too...have you ever looked into a specific breed that might not bother your allergies? I am allergic too, and I have a devon rex who doesn't bother me at ALL...they don't have the same kind of fur like most cats...he's got very fine, curly hair and he hardly ever sheds, so maybe that's why? I'd be glad to post a picture of him if you want.
I've also heard that an EXCELLENT breed for people with even severe allergies is the Siberian cat. Apparently they lack the protein in their saliva that most people are allergic to, so are good for allergy sufferers even though they are very large and have long, thick fur. Just a thought...
 

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Have you ever seen Chinese Crested's? They are beautiful little dogs who are of a small/meduim size, who are most hairless (I assume would be good for your allergies), and who aren't to horribly active or hard to controol on a leash. I would suggest going through a rescue, where the dog has already been fostered in a home, so that you can 1. visit with the dog for atleast an hour to see what your reaction will be like to his hair type and 2. know the dogs temperment, his likes/dislikes, have the foster home match you with the RIGHT dog for your situation. I would suggest taking the dog out for a walk when visiting it to see what type of energy level the animal has & how it reacts on a leash. If you are fragile then obviousley a large, strong, hyperactive dog who pulls feircly on the leash could be a danger to you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I've never had a problem with my allergies when I'm around dogs. Just with bunnies and kitties


I would prefer a medium to large sized dog, mostly because it would make me feel more comfortable. I was attacked by a pekinese when I was only 3 years old...tore my face right open. Ever since then I have not been fond of small dogs (not to say that there aren't any great small dogs out there...I just have a bad memory association with them). I spent most of my adolescence around rather large labrador mixes, so I'm more comfortable around bigger dogs.
 

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I've had at least 2 dogs living with me at once for my entire life - all different sizes, breeds, etc. The majority were on the small/medium side, and I have to say that the larger breeds seem much more calm and content with hanging out and sleeping lol. My newest baby is the largest dog I've ever had, and seems to be the most adaptable. He is a 90lb (and growing) Shar-Pei/Mastiff/Pitbull(???) mix. He's the calmest, most cuddly thing in the world!


I found him on www.petfinder.com

The site lets you search shelters in your area for dogs.

I'd suggest doing what I did - go through the site and make a list of the dogs you are interested in (dog's name, breed, name of shelter), then go to the shelters. They'll let you visit with the dogs & you can get an idea of their personalities, whether or not they'll be hyperactive, etc.

Good luck!
 

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A dog's personality is only partially determined by it's breed. I'd suggest you go down to the shelter and check out the dogs. There will be a personality that matches yours - guaranteed.

When my husband and I decided we were ready for a dog, we checked out the local shelters (Las Vegas, actually - I recommend the Humane Society on Dewey). We found our dog at Leid Animal Shelter (North Las Vegas) which is really the pound. They have way too many dogs and not enough caretakers. Anyway, we saw this little light brown pile of matted fur. His chart said he was a cockapoo and that he'd been brought to the pound because "dog sleeps to much." I kid you not. We took him for a walk and decided he was the one.

We couldn't be happier! We love him so much and he really suits our lifestyle. It turns out that he was just sick when he was at the pound and that he has more energy than anyone thought he did. But he's still a very mellow dog. And he came housetrained! He's fantastic!

(Oh, and I'm allergic to cats, too. But I still have four!
)
 

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rescued greyhounds <3 i cannot say enough good things about them. i hope to foster/adopt them someday.

i think other than pitbulls they are one of the most abused breeds. when they are too old to race anymore (which is pretty young), they're usually euthanized. lots of them end up in labs, though.
 
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