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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi I'm new here and had a question for anyone who could answer it. I was wondering if the humane societies had any laws or policies that they must abide by before killing an animal. Im doing a project for school but can't seem to find any information regarding this topic. Any information would be useful! Thanks again!<br><br><br><br>
Animals are people too!!
 

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Can you be more specific?<br><br><br><br>
I know in that in the netherlands animals should be killed with as less suffering as possible.<br><br><br><br>
Therefore they use electric shocks to kill immediatly, and some slaughterhouses use Carbondioxide ( I thought) to "sedate" the animal for killing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
An example would be that an animal, lets say a cat, was abandoned and someone found it. They would then take it to the humane society thinking that it could easily find a home since it turned out to be a sweet cat. The cat, however, has a runny eye which could be from upper respiratory inflation to an eye infection. Both which can easily be treatable. Could the humane society destroy the cat without that person's knowledge or before the paper work is fully completed?
 

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I don't know much about this but there is probably a short waiting period. Even our local animal control has a 3 day waiting period for adopting an animal and I would assume it's the same for putting one down. I don't know if that's decided locally or nationally or if it's enforced in any way.<br><br><br><br>
Have you tried contacting someone through the HSUS website?
 

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Each city sets their own rules.<br><br><br><br>
Usually there's a holding period where they wait and see if the animal's owner will comes to reclaim the animal. During this time they would probably do a temperment test and health screening to determine how adoptable the animal is. The animal would be put up for adoption. Depending on space limitations, they may be required to put that animal or another animal to sleep if they are overcrowded at the time.<br><br><br><br>
There a lot of "sweet cats" who aren't easily adopted out and due to space limitations have to be put to sleep. Humane societies in general have limited space, limited resources, too many people abanding pets, and not enough people adopting pets.
 

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Sad, sad. sad. I think the humane society is one of the saddest places I can think of, except maybe third world countries where everyone and everything is emaciated and disease-ridden, and slaughterhouses. I cry everytime I go there, because I look at all the animals' sweet little faces and know that so many of them won't make it out alive. Just thinking about killing an animal because you can't find a home for it is depressing. Young animals with a full life ahead, old animals that once had a happy home and now have no more chances, or ones that lived in fear due to abuse and now no one wants to adopt them due to their withdrawn personality, sweet babies that could be a companion, a friend, the best dog or cat...<br><br>
I wish we didn't have out-of-control animal population...sad, sad...fortunately, they're sponsoring a free stray animal neuter/spay around here, so if you know of any stray animals you can bring them in to wherever they're doing it and they'll be neutered or spayed. Hurray! I know of a few NOT stray cats around here that aren't neutered but are left to roam the outdoors by their guardians. How irresponsible!! I might just scoop them up and have them neutered, then claim ignorance if their people find out. Something tells me that if you didn't have your cat neutered already, you wouldn't be too open to the idea of having them neutered in general. Isn't illegal to have your cat not neutered and let it outside? So this is one time i think "an eye for an eye" is okay...they're doing something illegal, but it's irresponsible, I may be doing something illegal by taking their cat away to get it neuteered...but at least it's a responsible thing to do...<br><br><br><br>
Cassie
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by Rodgerette</i><br><br><b>Animals are people too!!</b></div>
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<br><br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/huh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":confused:">
 

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I don't think Humane Societies are the sadest places ever, though I do know what you're saying. But without them the animals fates would be much worse off. They save a lot of lives, reunite a lot of lost pets with the owners, and find many many abandoned animals new homes. They can't save everyone, but they're doing more than most of us, myself included of course.
 

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I know the humane society in my town treats sick animals and they keep them at the shelter until they get homes or become 'kennel crazed' (barking aimlessly at the walls, running around in circles, running INTO walls). If the animals get to that point they say the animal is suffering so they euthanize it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The shelter close to me I want to try to get shut down. They don't take care of their dogs, they never have water or food, there is pee and poop all over the place and they have a section for "unsuitable" animals that they won't even let you see. They also put the animals down way too fast without a chance to find them a good home. I don't know if it's by an injection or what but I'm going to find out. When I was looking for a puppy I went there to see if they had a small one...they had a medium sized one that was pretty thin but it wasn't aloud to be adopted yet becuase it had just been brought in so I went back a week later and it seemed even thinner than when they brought it in. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/sad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":("> GRRR!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The shelter close to me I want to try to get shut down. They don't take care of their dogs, they never have water or food, there is pee and poop all over the place and they have a section for "unsuitable" animals that they won't even let you see. They also put the animals down way too fast without a chance to find them a good home. I don't know if it's by an injection or what but I'm going to find out. When I was looking for a puppy I went there to see if they had a small one...they had a medium sized one that was pretty thin but it wasn't aloud to be adopted yet becuase it had just been brought in so I went back a week later and it seemed even thinner than when they brought it in. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/sad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":("> GRRR!!!!
 

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I volunteer at the Nebraska Humane Society and it breaks down like this:<br><br><br><br>
All incoming animals are assessed the day of intake for signs of acute illness or injury.<br><br><br><br>
Strays are held for 3 or 5 days (depending on which county they were picked up in), at the end of which the animal becomes the property of the shelter.<br><br><br><br>
Owner surrenders become the property of the shelter as soon as the owner signs them over. The owner is told and signs a piece of paper indicating they are relinquishing ownership of said animal and that the humane society can do as it wants with the animal, including euthanasia. Individuals bringing in strays are also given the same information and sign the paper.<br><br><br><br>
Owner surrenders and strays over 3/5 days are assessed for health, age, temperament, etc. Any animal that fails the temperament test is retested by a different staff member.<br><br><br><br>
A staff member makes the decision to either A. Place the animal up for adoption; B. Send the animal to foster care (b/c of illness, lack of space at the shelter, mild behavior problems, etc.); or C. Euthanize the animal.<br><br><br><br>
All dogs or cats that go on the adoption floor are then spayed or neutered (if they are not already altered).<br><br><br><br>
All animals, regardless of whether they will make it to adoption or not, are given fresh food, water, and clean bedding daily. Dogs and cats often get toys as well.<br><br><br><br>
Euthanasia is done through chemical injection, same as in vet's offices.<br><br><br><br>
I think each shelter comes up with its own rules and regulations, but they do have to follow basic humane standards or risk getting ticketed and/or shut down. However, in a lot of places, getting a shelter investigated is difficult, let alone shut down.
 

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I forgot to mention--once an animal is up for adoption, it stays there until it is adopted or gets aggressive or overly sick. Animals that come in sick are often treated--this includes treating heartworm positive dogs.
 
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