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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I was watching youtube clips about raw food and came across this. At the 40 second mark, she talks about how she only runs luke warm water over her dishes to clean them. Shouldn't you use soap?
 

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I don't really use soap either. Only for stuff that is really stuck on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That is awesome, saves a lot of pollution from bottles and the actual soap going down the drain. I just always figured it didn't kill germs.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Barilko View Post

So how do rid your dishware of the smell of food?
I don't know, they're dishes. They don't smell like things.
 

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I think that it would depend upon what was on your dishes and for how long. I guess that if you don't eat animals or animal products then it may be fine if you have a non-porus dish ware (like corel (spelling)) I personally think that it would be a good idea to use a cleaner just to make sure that you removed any water borne or food borne illnesses off of them. I often use baking soda and vinegar on almost everything.
 

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Only lukewarm water doesn't sound very sanitary in my opinion. Germs die from heat or from extreme cold. Lukewarm would be a breeding ground for them.
 

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After a green smoothie I rinse out the blender with cold water and wipe it clean and dry with a paper towel. About once every two or three weeks I put a little soap in it and wash it but so far, after a couple years of smoothies about 4 times a week, there has never been a problem, never been sick or anything.
Maybe I've been lucky, or maybe my cold water wipe clean with paper towel is enough for whatever I've been blending. Oh, and by the way, I've always cleaned it right after making the smoothie, it has never sat there with remmants of smoothie still in it.
best regards, Gil.
P.S. If your kitchen is shared with others then there might be any number of unknown stuff lurking and cleaning may need to be more complete.
 

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I just rinse my dish off with water and a good scrubbing. It's just veggies. I don't get sick after all these years of doing it so no worries. People are so worried about germs, they should be concerned with their immune system more than the germs.

However, try something like vinegar if you really want it clean.

Also remember to rinse with cold water afterward, as hot water goes through pipes that could carry metals that are not good for you.
Generally a hot water wouldn't do much for germs anyway, you'd need to heat it to something like 165F for a while... anything that's burning your hand isn't going to be pleasant washing with.

See, I'm more concerned about lead than germs.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by t0mmy View Post

I just rinse my dish off with water and a good scrubbing. It's just veggies. I don't get sick after all these years of doing it so no worries. People are so worried about germs, they should be concerned with their immune system more than the germs.

However, try something like vinegar if you really want it clean.

Also remember to rinse with cold water afterward, as hot water goes through pipes that could carry metals that are not good for you.
Generally a hot water wouldn't do much for germs anyway, you'd need to heat it to something like 165F for a while... anything that's burning your hand isn't going to be pleasant washing with.

See, I'm more concerned about lead than germs.
Exactly. I don't mind the odd germ anyway. I never get sick, and it's probably because I expose myself to germies.

BTW...This is my 1000th post!!!!!
 

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The two reasons I use a dishwasher are:
- it uses less water than washing dishes by hand
- it sanitizes the dishes with very hot water and steam
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sequoia View Post

I don't know, they're dishes. They don't smell like things.
Your food must be very bland-I made some Hummus yesterday that could be smelled from two rooms away it had so much Garlic.

My guess is that your dishware does smell you're just used to the pong.

Quote:
Originally Posted by maggiesdaddy View Post

...I often use baking soda and vinegar on almost everything.
X2-one of the oldest tricks in the book and one of the best

Quote:
Originally Posted by t0mmy View Post

remember to rinse with cold water afterward, as hot water goes through pipes that could carry metals that are not good for you.
Generally a hot water wouldn't do much for germs anyway, you'd need to heat it to something like 165F for a while... anything that's burning your hand isn't going to be pleasant washing with.

See, I'm more concerned about lead than germs.
Where do live that uses lead pipes-ancient Rome?

Honestly I've read some nonsense on this forum but your post takes the cake-literally.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Barilko View Post

Your food must be very bland-I made some Hummus yesterday that could be smelled from two rooms away it had so much Garlic.

My guess is that your dishware does smell you're just used to the pong.
I don't know why you care so much about how I wash my dishes. I asked my bf whether or not they smell, and he said no.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Barilko View Post

Honestly I've read some nonsense on this forum but your post takes the cake-literally.
Why are you being so catty? If you want to use soap to wash your dishes, then use soap. Some of us don't see the point in doing so. Pick something else to be neurotic about.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Barilko View Post

Someone is badly mixed up-lead hasn't been used in plumbing for hundreds of year-I can't believe there are people alive who don't know that.

Honestly I've read some nonsense on this forum but your post takes the cake-literally.
Here ya go:
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/29/health/29real.html

I hope that cake my post took is made without animal products ;^D

@sequoia: Hey, you used your 1000th post to reply to me. I feel so honored! ^___^
(even though all your posts are valued, but honored none the less!)
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by shellie View Post

Only lukewarm water doesn't sound very sanitary in my opinion. Germs die from heat or from extreme cold. Lukewarm would be a breeding ground for them.
+1, There is something to be said for actually cleaning things, raw food or not.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by t0mmy View Post

See, I'm more concerned about lead than germs.
A couple points:
- You ought to be concerend about both, not one or the other.
- There are water testing kits available that you can use to see if your water has lead or other contaminants in it. If you think there's a chance your pipes are old enough to have lead in them then you should test your water.
- The article you linked to said "Hot water from the tap should never be used for cooking or drinking." but it doesn't say anything about washing or rinsing. Seems reasonable to assume that washing in hot water and rinsing in any temperature (cold if you prefer) should be safe.
- From what I've read, adults are at extremely low risk of lead poisoning due to contaminated tap water. It's infants that are the people to worry about when it comes to lead in tap water.
- There are filters you can purchase and install that remove almost all of the lead, making it safe to drink and use for cooking.

It seems silly to risk an infection of samonella, e coli, or other microbial due to a possibly irrational fear of lead poisoning. Just test your water and know for sure what's in it!
 

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It's food for thought.

Think about your measuring spoons/cups. Do you soak&scrub them every time you measure out a half cup of soymilk, or do you just rinse them and go on with things? How is food any different?

I couldn't leave oils on my plates... Oil, and some other food residues are sticky. As they sit exposed to the air, they are collecting a heck of a lot more dirt, germs, spores, dust, dander, hair, microbes, etc... than they would if their surface was cleaned with an emulsifier of some kind.

To those who never use soap on eating dishes/utensils... What about oils? Fried Foods? Is there a thin layer of grease covering all of your plates over time?

And what kind of plates are we talking about, over-glazed ceramic or stoneware? ...Or a flimsy plastic Family Dollar bowl? Plastic hangs on to food and odor.

Or... is it more like only washing dishes if there's food stuck to them, but just rinsing if the food rinses away easily.

I'll admit that out of shear laziness I'll only rinse out a bowl that's only been used to hold carrot sticks, but once I've used it for my awesome fried broccoli, it needs to soak a bit.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ElaineV View Post

A couple points:
- You ought to be concerend about both, not one or the other.
I'm really not concerned with either. Like I said, my immune system is fantastic and I rinse with cold water. So neither one should concern me.

Quote:
- There are water testing kits available that you can use to see if your water has lead or other contaminants in it. If you think there's a chance your pipes are old enough to have lead in them then you should test your water.
I just rinse with cold water, so I don't need to spend money on a kit. And please note the article said new (hotwater) pipes contain lead, not just old pipes.

Quote:
- The article you linked to said "Hot water from the tap should never be used for cooking or drinking." but it doesn't say anything about washing or rinsing. Seems reasonable to assume that washing in hot water and rinsing in any temperature (cold if you prefer) should be safe.
This is what I suggested. If washing with hot water, I suggested to rinse with cold after.

Quote:
- From what I've read, adults are at extremely low risk of lead poisoning due to contaminated tap water. It's infants that are the people to worry about when it comes to lead in tap water.
Lead poisoning and chronic ingestion of lead are completely different cases. If I consumed lead from hot tap water then I could build up lead in my body over time which causes drastic health problems, but it is not acute lead poisoning. This is far more harmful than germs which are essentially everywhere and your body takes care of relatively easily (or at least should).

Quote:
- There are filters you can purchase and install that remove almost all of the lead, making it safe to drink and use for cooking.
Yes, and those filters say to use cold water when using the filter--not a coincidence there ;^D
But, again, I wasn't talking about drinking/cooking, just rinsing with cold water after using hot water for cleaning.

Quote:
It seems silly to risk an infection of samonella, e coli, or other microbial due to a possibly irrational fear of lead poisoning. Just test your water and know for sure what's in it!
For as long as I've been alive I have never had any of those diseases. I generally don't even wash my veggies since they're organic, just eat them whole. The ironic thing is, if you are washing your plates/veggies with hot water you're most likely ingesting lead which harms the immune system... you are MORE likely to get sick from salmonella/e. coli/etc. with a compromised immune system.
Call it irrational fear that I rinse with cold water, but what I choose is based on logical reasons to me. I've never been sick because I rinse with cold water, but if you want to do some lead tests and see which of us have more lead in their tissues then maybe that would help settle your mind about things? Personally, I don't care, I'll just stick with the cold water :^]
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hazelnut View Post

It's food for thought.

Think about your measuring spoons/cups. Do you soak&scrub them every time you measure out a half cup of soymilk, or do you just rinse them and go on with things? How is food any different?

I couldn't leave oils on my plates... Oil, and some other food residues are sticky. As they sit exposed to the air, they are collecting a heck of a lot more dirt, germs, spores, dust, dander, hair, microbes, etc... than they would if their surface was cleaned with an emulsifier of some kind.

To those who never use soap on eating dishes/utensils... What about oils? Fried Foods? Is there a thin layer of grease covering all of your plates over time?

And what kind of plates are we talking about, over-glazed ceramic or stoneware? ...Or a flimsy plastic Family Dollar bowl? Plastic hangs on to food and odor.


Or... is it more like only washing dishes if there's food stuck to them, but just rinsing if the food rinses away easily.

I'll admit that out of shear laziness I'll only rinse out a bowl that's only been used to hold carrot sticks, but once I've used it for my awesome fried broccoli, it needs to soak a bit.
I don't really eat oil, but if I do I will use a bit of soap to get it off.

My dishes are glazed ceramic ones.
 
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