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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i emailed loreal because their website makes it sound like they stopped animal testing, yet they are still on peta's list... i got back a reply that doesnt make much sense but it sounds as if they halted animal testing on finished products, yet not on new ingredients

they make it sound as if they are trying to stop testing, yet govt regulations are not allowing it? this confuses me since there are so many companies out there that dont test on animals period... and i am assuming that they have to follow the same govt regulations as loreal.

could anyone clear this up for me? i have posted a list on another site that lists hair products that are free from animal testing and i had a person post that loreal doesnt test on animals, but i am not clear on what they do exactly and i dont want to take them off the "does test on animals" list unless i am sure that they dont.

i'm sorry if this post isnt clear... the whole thing isnt clear to me either
 

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Try posting the reply/email you sent and it might be a bit clearer for us?

Maybe they mean they dont test, but they buy ingredients and patents from companies that are actively testing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
the reply, with my original question at the bottom... they didnt really answer my question at all

its confusing because arent they very well known for testing on animals?

and other companies dont have to test on animals, so why is loreal subject to regulations and not other companies?
Quote:
Originally Posted by loreal View Post

Dear Madam, Dear Sir,

L'Oréal has stopped using laboratory animals for the evaluation of its finished cosmetic products since 1989.

Concerning chemical ingredients, various national regulations require that suppliers, still this day, conduct the necessary tests to guarantee the innocuousness and safety of these ingredients.

During the past 20 years, L'Oréal has devoted a lot of effort to research in order to develop and have alternative methods to laboratory animal testing validated.

Beyond the progress already made industry and academic research face, in the forthcoming years, a major challenge: to develop new alternative methods for the safety assessment of chemical ingredients in several fields of toxicology where they are still lacking today, and ensure their validation by competent regulators.

L'Oréal absolutely supports the objective of the elimination of laboratory animal testing.

L'Oréal is an active member of the European Partnership for the development of alternative methods, leaded by the European Commission in November 2005, and L'Oréal is committed to keep on doing whatever possible, in its field of experience, in order to promote this program to the whole industry.

The recent acquisition by L'Oréal of the tissue engineering company, Skin Ethic, is testimony to our continued commitment and places us as a leading protagonist in the field of alternatives methods.

Hoping to have replied to your questions, we remain at your entire disposal for any further information you may require.

Best regards,

L'Oréal Research

-----Message d'origine-----

De : Envoyé : dimanche 11 février 2007 01:09 À : [email protected] Objet : Research and Development

LAST NAME :

FIRST NAME : Joyce

COUNTRY : Canada

ACTIVITY :

EMAIL :

MESSAGE : I understand that loreal halted animal testing on final products

in 1989. Do you still engage in animal testing of any kind on your new

ingredients at any stage of development?

thank you
 

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I might write back something along these lines: There's no legal requirement in the U.S. that personal care products be tested on animals. If you're using ingredients that you feel require animal tests to ensure their safety, don't use those ingredients. Other personal care product companies have completely eliminated animal tests throughout their manufacturing process; therefore so can L'oreal. You should also use only plant-based or synthetic ingredients. I don't want animals dying for my creme rinse.

Sincerely,
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks!

i didnt know there wasnt a legal requirement? how can they say there is if there isnt? their site makes it look as if they are doing animals a favor?!?!

grrr
 

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yes, the letter is confusing...they pay a great deal of money to spin masters to say lots but say nothing at all. As far as I know, there are no laws in North American legislating cosmetic corporations to perform gruesome tests on animals; however, if companies claim their products have medical properties, or they claim their products will heal a medical condition then by law they are required to conduct that type of testing. And I believe, that is exactly what L'Oreal (along with the others) is trying to to...claim their products can and do cure, heal, treat everything and anything. And that is the quise they are using to defend their cruelty and at the same time avoid giving a simple and direct answer to your question. The words are meaningless and why do they need so many words to try to tell you that..uhm...yes...but...well...however...

Molly W
 

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Although animal testing of pharmaceuticals and chemicals is still mandated by law, the same arguments against using animals in cosmetics testing are valid when applied to the pharmaceutical and chemical industries. These industries are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration and the Environmental Protection Agency, respectively, and animal tests are now required by law -- laws that were developed haphazardly in the 1920s. We know that non-animal test methods exist right now and that these tests are more accurate in predicting toxicity than are crude, cruel tests on animals. It is the responsibility of the companies that kill animals in order to bring their products to market to convince the regulatory agencies that there is a better way to determine product safety. Companies resist progress because the crude nature of animal tests allow them to market many products that might be determined too toxic if cell culture tests were used.
 
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