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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Firstly, I have lost two cats in the past to feline leukemia so this is a big concern to me. I have a cat who tries to escape everytime I open the door, my other 3 cats are not interested. I'm afraid this cat will get feline leukemia or something equally nasty and bring it back to the other cats if I allow him to come and go- they have been vaxed against it but my vet said it is like 60% effective
Any suggestions how to calm this cat's urge to go out? (he has been fixed so it's not THAT LOL)
 

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What about taking him out on one of those cat leashes? I know someone whose cat always wants out and she takes him out in the yard with one of those. He really enjoys it. It doesn't really solve the problem and I don't know, it may make him want to get out more, but it's something to consider.
 

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we tried to use one of those kittyleashes on my moms satankitty, who would always try to escape...

once outside while on the leash, he freaked out... dropped to the ground bug eyed and fluffed up tail

he just needed to experiance outside to know that he really didnt want to be out there

good luck with your cat

Caroline
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
SilverC , It sounds like you have a funny little cat, My cat likes to go in the bunbun's cage but it's not really funny when he gets stuck thought

then the bunbun gets annoy-d and pops out the cage ( It looks like my cat's giving birth to a bunbun)
 

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Exactly.

My cat doesn't try to go outside, but yes, I used a squirt bottle to teach my cat not to jump up on my kitchen table. Now I just leave a squirt bottle on the table and that's detterent enough for him.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by scareyvegan

once outside while on the leash, he freaked out... dropped to the ground bug eyed and fluffed up tail
My cat hated the leash, too, but it never occured to me that, once out in the world, the cat was simply overwhelmed, which makes sense considering how easily cats are freaked out by changes and new surroundings.
 

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I take my cat in rides in my car. She sits on my lap and looks out the window and purrs. I did this with my foster cats too. They love it. But I've heard that some cats don't like cars, though I've never met one that didn't.
 

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my moms and my sisters cats hate cars

they cry and hiss and screech

they also release that odor from their anal glands... which is a quite terrible experience

petting them, soothing music, talking to them - nothing helps

they are definitely a million times worse if they are both in the car, one or the other isnt quite so awful

Caroline
 

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yeah mine used to try to sneak outside all the time, even when we lived in an apartment building he'd try to get out into the hall. so i let him once, or picked him up and brought him outside, and he'd do the same thing, crouch down, look around nervously, and bolt back into the house/apartment. he doesn't even bother trying now at this house, he snuck out once when we first moved in and didn't even make it to the end of the top step
 

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Driving with pets free to roam in the car is dangerous. It can create distractions for the driver and, in the case of an accident, result in greater injury than if the animal were contained in a carrier. It may not seem nice, but it's the safest way to transport an animal while driving.

I don't mean to imply judgment, kpickell, but I felt it important to share the facts. I happen to have worked as a traffic violator school instructor, and I became aware of the danger then. I even taught this in my class. Just yesterday, I saw a woman trying to make a left-hand turn with a dog in her lap, and she could barely get both of her arms to the steering wheel. I can't imagine that left-hand turn being safe.

Be safe.
 

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Epski is absolutely right. It is as unsafe to allow your pets to roam free in the car as it would be for the kids and adults to be un-seatbelted. My cats HATE the carriers, they cry the whole time they're in them (hence me acquiring some mild sedatives if the trip's going to be long), but they're non-negotiable for me. I just try to minimize taking my cats anywhere.

My dog has a seatbelt harness that he wears when we're in my car - he hated it the first few times we went out but he's starting to get used to it. Loose, if we had an accident his 85 pounds would rocket straight through the windshield and I'd never forgive myself. When we drive my husband's pickup truck we anchor his crate in the truck bed and he rides in there.

I know that it's a huge pain in the butt, but please try to contain your animals in your cars. I grew up with the cats and/or dogs crawling all over the car, and thought it was perfectly normal. But it really can lead to tragedy.
 

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Best thing to do if kitty really, really wants to go out is get a harness and take him/her outside. In the summer I'll put a stake in the ground and attach a long piece of rope to her harness. She's quite content chomping on grass and laying in the sun. I never let her outside by herself though..
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
My cat Tarwater gets excited when I take out his harness. So does Monzo, his brother. Our youngest two haven't been outside since they were kittens a few years ago (and then we took them out with harnesses) ; they get overwhelmed with the noise because our house is on a busy downtown intersection in a small city. The yard is relatively quiet, but there's a lot of activity in the area, so they get spooked outside. Our last adoptee was kept outside 24/7 by the woman who'd adopted him from a pet store. He's generally pretty happy indoors and even thinking of getting a harness on him would likely result in a cat bite.


I guess the only tips I'd have are to keep life interesting for him and make sure that he gets plenty of exercise. Put away certain toys for awhile and take them back out again after a week or two. Leave little tartar control treats in locations in his reach in your home. Outdoor cats have all kinds of grasses to nibble on outdoors; consider growing cat grass for him, if you haven't already. If he's the only cat in your home at this time, consider getting him a buddy to keep him occupied. Engage in interactive play with him so that he gets burn that energy that he wants to burn.

Also, don't forget that you could always build a run for him to go outside. The materials you'd need would be fairly inexpensive. You'd just have to ensure that it was sturdy and big enough for him to explore.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
my buddy (cat) was leash trained as well. he's very scared of people though so mostly we walk late at night. now he doesn't need the leash, prefers without it, just stays along. he's kind of doggish in that if i run, he'll run to catch up & we take turns chasing each other. like kpickell's cats, he sits on my lap or on the back shelf when he drive, he gets way too stressed otherwise and we spend an hour in the car once a week.

oh right, the question about cats that want to go outside (mine goes outside mostly supervised) but since you're guarding against leukemia - i've heard pennies in a popcan work good.. shake it when you're near the door (worked ok for my roommates cat) - cats hate loud noises. my cat knows "sit" and "stay" so i don't have to worry.
 
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