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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A co-worker has a quaker parrot who pulled out the feathers around it's neck. Does anyone know if the feathers will grow back? Right now she's spending six weeks at Animal Kingdom for behavioral modification. She's been biting her owner who apparently didn't spend enough time handling her. AK is supposed to retrain her and get her used to being handled. I visited her the other day and she didn't seem very friendly. I am considering taking her in if the owner decides to give her away. I am just wondering if it's possible to get her used to being handled at this point and if the feather plucking issue can be corrected. If anyone has had experience with this type of situation, your comments would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
 

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The feathers may or may not grow back depending on how long this behavior has been going on (the follicles are more likely to become damaged the more times feathers have been pulled from them).<br><br><br><br>
You might want to try a forum for bird owners, if you haven't already. I've read a bit about this subject, but I don't have any first-hand experience.
 

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Does the co-worker you know smoke? It seems like the feather-pulling is more behavioral, but smoking in the house prompts some birds to pull their feathers out.<br><br><br><br>
How old is the bird? If she is younger she might be going through sexual maturity causing her to become more aggressive. Some birds (especially conures) that reach sexual maturity may have been raised from a baby by the same owner, but one day decides to hate being handled. The feather-pullling may be a result of boredom (not enough toys or interaction) or too much stress in her life. Do you know if she has had any previous owners?<br><br><br><br>
But I agree with Iria, whether her feathers grow back or not depends on how long the behavior has lasted.<br><br><br><br>
Quakers have a reputation for being moody birds in general, (although there are of course exceptions) and getting her to be a friendly bird again may or may not work out. It will take a lot of time.<br><br><br><br>
I hope I helped out a little bit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
She belongs to my co-worker's mother. I do not think she smokes. The mother got her as a baby from someone who's femal QP had babies. The co-worker did say that the mother stopped spending as much time with her as she did in the past. I believe the bird is two years old, maybe three but not older than that. Thanks to both of you for your response! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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Karen, this site looks like it could be helpful? <a href="http://www.websitetoolbox.com/tool/mb/luciedove" target="_blank">http://www.websitetoolbox.com/tool/mb/luciedove</a><br><br>
I hope you get the bird - I'll bet you'd do a better job with her.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks Irizary....the link is great! Just what I was looking for! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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I raised a quaker parrot during my teenage years (Booger, RIP)...they can be VERY moody, but I found that if they think for a second that you're intimidated by that beak of theirs, they'll use it!<br><br><br><br>
My family has alot of experience with birds, and we've found that the number one cause of behavioral problems stems from lack of attention. Not to say that we ever neglected our birds, but when there are life changes (new jobs, working extra hours, etc), birds are easily affected. You have to think of them like little kids who will never grow up. If you don't pay much attention to a small child, they are likely to misbehave to get attention.<br><br><br><br>
Since this quaker parrot is still young, it might be possible to get her behavior to change. She probably doesn't trust humans much right now because the one that raised her didn't pay as much attention to her as she used to (like you said). Quakers need alot of interaction, and it does take some time for them to warm up to people, like with most birds. Some aren't very friendly towards strangers, but I think with alot of love, she might warm up to you.<br><br><br><br>
I hope you get the bird <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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You might find Quaker Talk handy.<br><br>
It is all Quaker owners some of them experts who have a forum to talk simply about their birds and to ask questions.<br><br><br><br>
I can tell you about my guys but they are mostly mentally ill from abuse and neglect by the time I get them so they are not the norm.<br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.birdsnways.com/chats/qtindex.htm" target="_blank">http://www.birdsnways.com/chats/qtindex.htm</a>
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you again! I went with Rebecca to see the bird a few days ago. She is doing better. And you can see new feathers coming in! Getting her out of the cage was the hardest part. Once she was out she came to me and I was able to pet her. I did notice that if I was the least bit timid with reaching to pet her, she would try to nip. If I was quick and firm she let me pet her. It doesn't look as if I will get the bird since she is letting Rebecca handle her more and more and the mom is in Florida right now and crying on the phone because she doesn't want to get rid of the bird. So hopefully, they have learned from this and once the bird goes back home the mom will be more attentive so that all of this work getting her re-trained to human contact will not have been wasted. I will get to bird-sit, however, when both Rebecca and her mom go away. That will be fun!
 
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