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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I did not find out until this past Monday that my food allergies cannot be immunized. The man I saw told me I simply had to avoid the foods I am allergic to as best I can, and he also told me that beans and legumes are my biggest worry/culprit.<br><br><br><br>
I am allergic to wheat, soy, corn, cauliflower, beans and legumes, peanuts and other various nuts.<br><br><br><br>
I am being treated for my allergies to weeds, grass pollens, and tree pollens. According to my doctor, these allergies are why I cannot consume fruits and being immunized for these will help my reactions so I can eat fruit again in around 6+ months.<br><br><br><br>
But without eating meat or being able to consume soy or beans or legumes, where <i>am</i> I going to get my protein?<br><br><br><br>
I do take a multivitamin everyday along with B12, but there's no way it will be sufficient. Or will it?
 

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Can you eat other grains like rye or barley? I find rye bread absolutely delicious. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/lick.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":lick:">
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Seb_0810</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Can you eat other grains like rye or barley? I find rye bread absolutely delicious. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/lick.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":lick:"></div>
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Actually, rye bread is a good idea. I have had it before and found it to be just as good as wheat bread.<br><br><br><br>
Thank you. ^_^ That will actually help a lot.
 

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How about quinoa? It is a complete protein (and I believe it might be a fruit, though it looks like a grain, so check on that).
 

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What about oats, quinoa and amaranth? Are you sure the nuts and pollen aren't connected too? It's not that uncommon, especially if you're allergic to birch or alder.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Snow White</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
What about oats, quinoa and amaranth? Are you sure the nuts and pollen aren't connected too? It's not that uncommon, especially if you're allergic to birch or alder.</div>
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They didn't mention it, but I go back in on Monday so I will remember to ask about that.<br><br><br><br>
I've bee printing off recipes here on the forums that lack the things I'm allergic to but provide some good nutrition.<br><br><br><br>
I'm going to check to see what food group Quinoa falls into, as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Actually, it sounds like Quinoa could be a perfect alternative to wheat. What I was reading states that it has 12-18% protein, which is far more than wheat, and has a complete set of amino acids.<br><br><br><br>
Amazing the things I am still learning. I am going to ask my allergist about Quinoa and Amaranth and try some recipes with these.<br><br><br><br>
ETA: Quinoa is an herb.
 

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There are many grains out there that provide a wide range of essential amino acids in considerable quantities, some of which have already been mentioned: spelt, amaranth, quinoa, buckwheat, brown rice, millet. I tend to substitute spelt for anything that would normally contain wheat, such as bread, crackers, cookies, pastry etc.<br><br><br><br>
I also like lupin, mostly in the form of <a href="http://www.ein-besseres-leben.de/q5016.html" target="_blank">these sausages</a>. Make sure you're not allergic to it though! Also, have you tried Quorn? It's very popular in the UK, it's a foodstuff containing mycoprotein, and is often found in the form of burgers, sausages and mince.<br><br><br><br>
Hope this helps! Good luck!
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>mazikeen</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
There are many grains out there that provide a wide range of essential amino acids in considerable quantities, some of which have already been mentioned: spelt, amaranth, quinoa, buckwheat, brown rice, millet. I tend to substitute spelt for anything that would normally contain wheat, such as bread, crackers, cookies, pastry etc.<br><br><br><br>
I also like lupin, mostly in the form of <a href="http://www.ein-besseres-leben.de/q5016.html" target="_blank">these sausages</a>. Make sure you're not allergic to it though! Also, have you tried Quorn? It's very popular in the UK, it's a foodstuff containing mycoprotein, and is often found in the form of burgers, sausages and mince.<br><br><br><br>
Hope this helps! Good luck!</div>
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Quorn is not vegan though <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/sad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":("><br><br><br><br>
Giid luck HA! I second the quinoa suggestion. I <3 quinoa pilaf with veg and lemon juice and raisins. Yum.
 

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Quorn isn't vegan, since their products contain egg whites. Some of them contain milk too. I suppose eating small amounts of egg beats going back to meat, but, while the egg they use is free range, it's not organic. Assuming I was vegan and faced with the issue of going back to eggs, I think I'd choose for local organic free range and preparing them myself over the processed stuff. But that's just me and I've tried Quorn and didn't particularly like it.<br><br><br><br>
I was going to suggest spelt, but it's closely related to wheat. Lupin, like beans and peanuts, belongs to the family Fabaceae, so I'd check that too.<br><br><br><br>
Apparently, there's a <a href="http://www.foodyoucaneat.com" target="_blank">website</a> where you type in the things you can't eat, and it will give you recipes that you can. It appears to be down at the moment though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I know I'm allergic to rice and millet [I knew I forgot a big one].<br><br><br><br>
My mom gets Quorn for herself and I did check it ... more than once ... and it isn't vegan. I'm uninterested in eating eggs. I'd like keep to avoiding them.<br><br><br><br>
Especially since I was watching a program on eggs and learned that Grade A eggs get cartoned, which is all fine and dandy, but no eggs are wasted. All of the lower grade eggs are what's in pre-packaged foods that contain eggs.<br><br><br><br>
So I don't think it's healthy for the abused chickens, and I don't think it's very healthy for people either.<br><br><br><br>
I printed off a Quinoa Pilaf recipe after it was suggested. ^_^
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Snow White</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Quorn isn't vegan, since their products contain egg whites. Some of them contain milk too. I suppose eating small amounts of egg beats going back to meat, but, while the egg they use is free range, it's not organic. Assuming I was vegan and faced with the issue of going back to eggs, I think I'd choose for local organic free range and preparing them myself over the processed stuff. But that's just me and I've tried Quorn and didn't particularly like it.</div>
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are you British? I think in the US the egg isn't even 'free range'. (I'm in the UK too though, so I could be wrong).
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>isowish</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
are you British? I think in the US the egg isn't even 'free range'. (I'm in the UK too though, so I could be wrong).</div>
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You're right, the US ingredient lists don't mention free range, so they're probably from battery hens. I'm not British, but I've lived in England on and off, so I mostly use my Sainsbury's account to read ingredients.<br><br><br><br>
I forgot to mention that amaranth is cooked the same way quinoa is (10-15 minutes 2:1 ratio of water), except it doesn't seem to double and doesn't need to be rinsed beforehand. You could probably mix the two together. You might be able to find puffed amaranth and quinoa too.
 

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nutritional yeast is a decent source of protein and other nutrients...<br><br>
oat milk might be an option if you're okay with oats.<br><br>
mushrooms...<br><br>
tahini? (you said nuts weren't okay, but how about seeds?)<br><br>
hemp seeds/ hemp protein powder in smoothies?
 
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oh, the joy of allergies..... *sympathises*<br><br><br><br>
for protein, what about a hemp (or similar) protein powder for emergency top-up stuff?<br><br><br><br>
also, did your allergist test individual legumes and beans, or use a 'legume and bean mix'? i'd check this out, because often they use a blend, and you consequently show up allergic to the mix as a whole.<br><br><br><br>
in that case you are told you're allergic to all beans and legumes, when infact you might just be reacting to one compound in the mix, and might actually be ok with some individual beans or legumes.<br><br><br><br>
if they did use a mix, i'd ask to have individual beans and legumes tested, and you might come up with some extra food choices- even if you were ok with one bean (say chickpeas) it would add a substantial amount of food options to your diet (hummus, gram flour for cooking with, falafels, and whole chickpeas, etc).<br><br><br><br>
good luck!
 

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As Snow White mentioned, spelt is related to wheat, so it might be a problem. I don't know if it's the gluten in wheat which is a problem for you, but rye (and oats, I think) also contain gluten- just not nearly as much as wheat does. But if you can tolerate them, that will make it easier for you. I'm surprised you are allergic to rice, which is usually hypoallergenic. Maybe you should ask your allergist if you run the risk of developing an allergy to a food if you start eating a lot of it- hopefully I'm being a worrywart for nothing.<br><br><br><br>
Quinoa is related to spinach, as you've probably found out. As several have mentioned, it's nutritious and tasty. However, I think you can get it pre-rinsed with those saponins already removed, so you can just cook it; that's how I got it. Maybe it's more expensive that way though.<br><br><br><br>
Some time ago I read up on various field crops. There's something called sorghum. There are 3 forms of it: one is used like sugarcane, one is for livestock feed and isn't really edible for humans, but I think the third form is edible for people. I haven't had it and don't know how palatable or nutritious it is.<br><br><br><br>
EDITED TO ADD: I just googled for "grain sorghum" (also known as milo), and I remembered right. Here's one of the links:<br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/afcm/sorghum.html" target="_blank">http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/afcm/sorghum.html</a><br><br><br><br>
Another link mentioned that folks who have trouble with wheat protein (celiac disease) can tolerate foods made with grain sorghum. I thought sorghum was related to millet, but I might be wrong.<br><br><br><br>
Seb_0810: can too much flax seed harm someone? I eat a heaping tablespoon of ground flaxseeds each day, mostly for the omega-3s, but that's not much.<br><br><br><br>
Poatoes have some protein, but not that much. They're high in carbohydrates- and those carbs are the rapidly-absorbed kind that cause a big spike in your blood sugar levels (I hope you don't have to worry about diabetes, but forwarned is forarmed). I love potatoes, but as a food, they have their limitations.
 

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Can I ask how the allergies were determined?
 

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I have heard of sorghum, but I can't remember any one eating it, but that doesn't mean anything. We do cook with Sorghum Molasses which is the thickest syrup type sweetner with a very strong flavor and dark color.
 

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can you eat spinach? that stuff is packed with protein, it has more protein per 100 calories then 100 calories of sirloin<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D">
 
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