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A race of aliens called the Zor arrives on a faraway planet populated by the Aree, lifeforms that are physiologically different, but psychologically identical to humans, that is, they have the same mental abilities as humans.

Compared to the human-like Aree, the Zor have vastly superior intelligence and awareness. The mental abilities of an adult Aree is equivalent to that of a Zor infant. The Zor are also technologically superior, such that when they arrive, they claim the planet as their own and use the Aree as food.

The planet has ample vegetation to nourish the super-intelligent Zor, but they chose to eat the Aree because they enjoy the taste of their meat. In so doing, the Zor inflict on the Aree suffering that is equivalent to that which we humans inflict on non-human animals that are raised for food in factory farms.

The lives of the Aree and their children are also cut short, as is the case for animals that are killed for food. Just like these animals, the Aree are not aware that they are being raised and killed for their meat, because the Zor are master manipulators.

Now, do you approve of the way the Zor treat the Aree? What about the way we treat animals when we raise them and kill them for food simply for the pleasure of eating their meat?

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EDIT: What do you think of this argument? Do you think it will convince the meat-eaters? Will you use it? Thanks!
EDIT2: I changed the names from "Eloi" to "Aree" and "Morlocks" to "Zor" to remove any references to H.G. Wells work. The argument should be considered on its own merits, not the merits of H.G. Wells's book "The Time Machine". While the names were inspired from the book, the argument itself is not. I appreciate your feedback on the argument itself.
 

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Preaching to the choir.
 

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I'm sure H.G. Wells doesn't mind you ripping him off at all.
 

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Yeah... no... this argument has been here for years...

Nice references though.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alt View Post

Yes, I was inspired by H.G. Wells's The Time Machine. :)
Weeeell, then I'm sure you are aware that Morlocks and Eloi were both descendants of the human species, not outer space travelers. It was actually criticism of the class system, and Wells own socialist views. In short, maybe this argument would work on some, but I doubt it. While I and other veg*ns may see a correlation between class relations and human/nonhuman relations, I doubt the average omni would.

Also, it's always nice to cite your sources.
 

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I think it's essentially a good argument, but I think it would be more effective if you replaced the Eloi and Morlocks with humans and some extraterrestrial species. So I'd rather go with War of the Worlds (with Tom Cruise!!!) or Independence Day.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sevenseas View Post

I think it's essentially a good argument, but I think it would be more effective if you replaced the Eloi and Morlocks with humans and some extraterrestrial species. So I'd rather go with War of the Worlds (with Tom Cruise!!!) or Independence Day.
*snort*
 

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I don't really think it's a 'proof that meat-eating is wrong' so much as an argument by analogy. Trying to get people to feel what it's like to be in the place of the Aree or Eloi.

It doesn't really address the reasons many people use to view other animals as simply something to be used.
 

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One interesting variation on this question is, what if the Zor genuinely needed to eat Aree to survive?

Would they be morally required to all starve to death and go extinct?

-Eugene
 

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One thing I've found is that a lot of meat eaters will say "But a lion kills other animals to eat - is that wrong? So why can't I?" etc.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eugene View Post

One interesting variation on this question is, what if the Zor genuinely needed to eat Aree to survive?

Would they be morally required to all starve to death and go extinct?

-Eugene
And an interesting variation of that is, imagine if the Zor discovered an economically viable way to produce Aree meat synthetically that was just as healthy (or maybe even healthier) than eating real Arees. Would they then be morally required to leave the Arees alone?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alt View Post

A race of aliens called the Zor arrives on a faraway planet populated by the Aree, lifeforms that are physiologically different, but psychologically identical to humans, that is, they have the same mental abilities as humans.

Compared to the human-like Aree, the Zor have vastly superior intelligence and awareness. The mental abilities of an adult Aree is equivalent to that of a Zor infant. The Zor are also technologically superior, such that when they arrive, they claim the planet as their own and use the Aree as food.

The planet has ample vegetation to nourish the super-intelligent Zor, but they chose to eat the Aree because they enjoy the taste of their meat. In so doing, the Zor inflict on the Aree suffering that is equivalent to that which we humans inflict on non-human animals that are raised for food in factory farms.

The lives of the Aree and their children are also cut short, as is the case for animals that are killed for food. Just like these animals, the Aree are not aware that they are being raised and killed for their meat, because the Zor are master manipulators.

Now, do you approve of the way the Zor treat the Aree? What about the way we treat animals when we raise them and kill them for food simply for the pleasure of eating their meat?

-----

EDIT: What do you think of this argument? Do you think it will convince the meat-eaters? Will you use it? Thanks!
EDIT2: I changed the names from "Eloi" to "Aree" and "Morlocks" to "Zor" to remove any references to H.G. Wells work. The argument should be considered on its own merits, not the merits of H.G. Wells's book "The Time Machine". While the names were inspired from the book, the argument itself is not. I appreciate your feedback on the argument itself.
Generally a good but not novel argument. I don't think you mean "psychologically identical" though because intelligence and cognitive abilities more broadly are within the subject of psychology.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Indian Summer View Post

And an interesting variation of that is, imagine if the Zor discovered an economically viable way to produce Aree meat synthetically that was just as healthy (or maybe even healthier) than eating real Arees. Would they then be morally required to leave the Arees alone?
Yes, in that case, obviously the Zor would be morally required to leave the Aree alone, just as I believe we are morally obligated to go vegan.

But, the more challenging questions is the one I posed, that in which it was genuinely needed for survival. And I am amazed that not even a single person was interested offering a reply, or thinking through the question.

My own views on this are at:
http://ar.vegnews.org/need_meat.html
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eugene View Post

But, the more challenging questions is the one I posed, that in which it was genuinely needed for survival. And I am amazed that not even a single person was interested offering a reply, or thinking through the question.

My own views on this are at:
http://ar.vegnews.org/need_meat.html
I pretty much agree with you that it would not be wrong under those circumstances. I guess maybe it depends a bit how they got into that situation - if they were obligate meat-eaters or if they just needed something to eat and had exhausted their non-animal food resources.
 
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