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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Some of my zucchinis have it!! Is there something organic I can do against it?

They are still growing though. Should I just cut away infested leaves and see how long they survie?

Thanks!
 

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oohhh...bummer, they were so pretty! I get that from time to time on my plants, it really makes the plant look like hell but it never killed any of mine? I tryed to look up some help on the matter but got conflicting results. One said that the mildew would not kill the plant because it needed a live host, and the other said it would eventually kill it??? One gave advice to spray it with a baking soda mix, but didn't give the mix ingredients...and baking soda is a lot like salt...that will kill the leaves itself woudn't it???Don't know??maybe if you water it down enough?

Sorry, not much help here....but I tryed. And like I said, I get it on my zucchini and my pumpkins...they always survive, and I do cut the really bad leaves.

Good luck man.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes, hey thanks a lot slynny! It's good to know your plants never died from it.

In my garden here it's not that bad either (yet?), and the plants are still growing strong and producing well and they don't look like they are dying.

This small system is way overloaded I think with all the plants, and I made a few mistakes already this season (hehe), so the plants have been stressed quite a bit. Considering all this, they are really doing well, but it's no wonder that they got sick eventually - I think stressed plants are more likely targets for pests?

I did some research myself too and you're right - there does not seem to be a consensus on PM. Well I don't really mind a few white spots on the leaves and the stem and a few dead leaves (though there were some really impressive, huge lower leaves I had to cut down and it hurt me!
). So if it doesn't kill the plants, I probably won't do anything besides cutting the bad leaves.

Hm yes, baking soda is alkaline, and I think all things that mess with the pH of the soil or leaf surface can do funky things to plants, so I will be careful there. But if the problem gets worse, I will look into it some more. I did hose down the plants once a few days ago but I'm not sure if it helped
As I said right now the infection is not very bad.

Thanks again
 

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Best to catch it early and trim off offending foliage. Once it gets going - it gets on everything.

My experience shows that it can and does kill plants. I have cucumbers that succombed to it (though it was a bad case as the entire month of July it rained here.....it was bizarre). I could have saved them with treatment spray, but my goal this year is a totally organic garden.
 

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Here's a recipe for an anti-fungal spray:

1 T. baking soda

1 T. vegetable oil

1 drop dishwashing soap

1 gallon water
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ooooops dammit. I saw Sky's answer just before, *after* I killed my three huge zucchini plants.


By now they were pretty much completely covered with a white layer of fungus, and not producing anymore. I figure the way the fungus kills is that while it is not poisonous for the plant, it makes it difficult to photosynthesize, and so the plant is slowly choked off. The last week or so, my zucchinis were barely growing and new flowers/fruit were aborted.

I did get a decent amount of fruit though over the summer, so I'm not bitter.


But I should have germinated new seed as soon as the disease started. The only standby I have right now to go in the garden is basil and I'm already growing a ton of it. Oh well, as long as it's green and it grows I'm happy


Luckily the disease doesn't seem to attack neither of the other veggies (tomatoes, lettuce, peppers, basil).
 

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Dang Oatmeal, now I feel bad
My zuchinni plants have it on them and so do my pumpkins...but its not real bad. I've only had to cut a few leaves. Anyway, sorry your plants died.
 

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Well, my pumpins are the the worst I've ever seen them with this stuff! Still, they're doing OK. I'll post pics.
 

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"Luckily the disease doesn't seem to attack neither of the other veggies (tomatoes, lettuce, peppers, basil"

Of course not. This is a disease that is known to attack vines like melons and squash. By the way, pumpkins and zucchini are the same species. Pumpkins are, basicly, nothing more than mature zucchini.
 

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Actually, there is nothing you can do for powderly mildew, and the other major mildew, at all, once the leaves get it. The best you can hope for is prevention by using fungicides before it shows up. If just a few leaves begin to show signs of it -- you need to spray the rest of the leaves before they get it also. That won't completely stop it, but it may slow it down long enough to allow you to pick mature-enough fruits.

These mildews like dampness. Prevention method: water early enough so that the leaves will dry before nightfall. Drip irrigate instead of spray-irrigate. Of course if you have lots of rain, there is nothing you can do. Also, they tend to prefer cold weather, so get your plants in early and pick fruits early, before fall coolness starts. I've seen melon plants that were fine one morning, and after a cool, rainy afternoon and evening, were totally covered with mildew the next day, and totally wilted too. From fine one day to mildew and wilted the next day. Warm weather means over 75 degrees F, preferably over 80. They like warm nights too.
 

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That's strange because it has been warm and dry till recently, and now cool but still dry...yet the fungus is surviving and thriving it seems?
 

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it has been warm and dry till recently, and now cool but still dry...yet the fungus is surviving and thriving it seems?

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Change from warm to cool, alone, could do the trick. Moisture from nightime dew may be enough moisture. Cool weather brings on more of it (temp dips below dew point).
 
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