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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,<br><br><br><br>
I have been vegan for a few days, after being vegetarian since January. My biggest problem at the moment is actually choosing recipes to make. Everything looks quite daunting to me as I'm only 18 and have never cooked a proper meal by myself, and I have bad memories associated with past attempts to do so <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":p">. I don't have enough ingredients to really cook anything at this stage, and although I could go and buy some, I'm afraid of committing to every recipe I come across. What I'm asking is for you to pick one or two recipes for me that are pretty basic and easy to make, perhaps things which you made when you were just starting out, and I'll give them a try. I'm hoping once I've made a few recipes my confidence will be higher and I'll be able to continue on my own.<br><br><br><br>
Thanks in advance for any help <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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It would help to know a few things first:<br><br>
Do you live at home (with your parents/etc) or away at school or on your own or what?<br><br>
What cooking experience DO you have?<br><br>
Very limited funds to buy groceries? What about space to store, places to cook, etc?<br><br>
UK, Canada, US, or do you live somewhere else? What supermarkets are near by? Any healthfood stores (not that you need them)?<br><br>
And most important, what do you LIKE to eat? (What did you like as a vegetaran or even before that? Any ideas would help)<br><br><br><br>
If we gave you simple instructions, but not exactly a recipe, would you be able to handle that or do you need absolutely everything spelled out in 1/2 cups and Tablespoons? (Either is fine).<br><br><br><br>
My oldest is 15 and does a great deal of the cooking for us. I'll ask her what some of the easier, better recipes and ideas are for someone starting out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Tofu-N-Sprouts</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Do you live at home (with your parents/etc) or away at school or on your own or what?</div>
</div>
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I just finished my last year of high school so I'm living at home with my parents until January, when I go to university.<br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Tofu-N-Sprouts</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
What cooking experience DO you have?</div>
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Only really basic knowledge, like how to boil and fry and microwave things.<br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Tofu-N-Sprouts</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Very limited funds to buy groceries? What about space to store, places to cook, etc?</div>
</div>
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Money won't be much of a problem for the moment as I'm still with my parents, but I'll be on a tighter budget next year. My kitchen has enough room to store quite a bit. I have a convection oven/microwave, a grill of the kind where food is crushed between two corrugated hotplates, and a gas stove to cook with.<br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Tofu-N-Sprouts</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
UK, Canada, US, or do you live somewhere else? What supermarkets are near by? Any healthfood stores (not that you need them)?</div>
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I live in Australia, and there are supermarkets and health food shops near me.<br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Tofu-N-Sprouts</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
And most important, what do you LIKE to eat? (What did you like as a vegetaran or even before that? Any ideas would help)</div>
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It's difficult to answer that question... I was never diagnosed with anything and kept it a secret from my parents, and I'm not sure that what I did would fit either the symptoms of anorexia or bulimia, but in the past, I would starve myself for a while, maybe one or two days of eating hardly anything, then I'd binge eat and purge. Kind of a hybrid between anorexia and bulimia I suppose. I did this for most of 2004. I don't think I was a really serious anorexic or bulimic, because I was able to do it covertly for about nine or ten months without any effects apart from always being ill and losing weight (I was actually a bit overweight at the start of 2004, but as the year went on I ended up underweight).<br><br><br><br>
I became vegetarian in January 2005 as a kind of compromise between eating normally and starving/vomiting. My real motivation at that time was to hide my eating disorder and have an excuse to eat less. Then, halfway through 2005, I dropped out of high school, which eliminated the main things which were causing the eating disorder, so I went back to being an omnivore and more or less ate normally (having for dinner whatever my parents cooked, to my knowledge a fairly ordinary white Australian diet with meat + boiled/roasted vegetables/salad). Then, at the start of this year, there was a period of about four or five days where I had to cook for myself. What I was going to make required some meat, so I went to the supermarket and looked at the long row of raw red meat, and it was at that point, gazing at it, that I had a kind of revelation. I didn't want to personally take part any longer in the cycle in which animals are produced and slaughtered only for human consumption, and it's unneccessary seeing as one can be more healthy on a plant-based diet, but of course you all already know this.<br><br><br><br>
This year I went back to finish high school. I didn't have the time (or so I told myself) to sit down and work out how to have a proper vegetarian diet, so I put off thinking about food until after I'd graduated, and lived off five things: fruit, breakfast cereal, microwaved frozen vegetarian meals/frozen fake meats, bread twists with tomato/chilli/garlic + cheese (which I got for free as they were leftovers from a local bakery within which i had contacts <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)">), and the salad/cooked vegetables which my parents would make.<br><br><br><br>
Well, there's the unabridged contemporary history of my relationship to food... it probably wasn't neccessary, maybe I should have started a new thread about it, but anyway, I've said it. A side effect of the eating disorder is that I don't really like any food at all, I'm sort of indifferent to it, which is why I'm now finding it hard to choose recipes. But I have well and truly gotten over the eating disorder. I haven't thought about starving/purging myself all year. And the indifference is probably due to having lived off pretty unremarkable food for a long time now, and having never tasted many of the things which are in recipes I find.<br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Tofu-N-Sprouts</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
If we gave you simple instructions, but not exactly a recipe, would you be able to handle that or do you need absolutely everything spelled out in 1/2 cups and Tablespoons? (Either is fine).</div>
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I'd like the instructions to be more precise rather than less, but I should be able to cope with any procedure you give me. If I really need clarification on something I'll ask for it.<br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Tofu-N-Sprouts</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
My oldest is 15 and does a great deal of the cooking for us. I'll ask her what some of the easier, better recipes and ideas are for someone starting out.</div>
</div>
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Okay, thanks.
 

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I think this should be easy to do - give you a bit of practice for cooking too before you go off to uni!<br><br><br><br>
not quite a risotto<br><br><br><br>
Serves 2-3<br><br><br><br>
I find risotto too stodgy usually, so Ive used ordinary rice here. This is just a great, flavoured rice to use with all sorts of dishes or on its own as a light supper or lunch.<br><br><br><br>
Wheat free, dairy free, nut free, meat free version...<br><br><br><br>
Ingredients...<br><br><br><br>
* 4 oz (100g) basmati rice<br><br>
* 2 oz (50g) sultanas, soaked for 20 minutes in cold water, then drained.<br><br>
* Punnet of cherry or small tomatoes, halved<br><br>
* 2 carrots, grated.<br><br>
* 8 oz (225g) button mushrooms, quartered<br><br>
* 2 celery sticks, finely chopped<br><br>
* Salt & pepper<br><br>
* 1 tbsp oil<br><br>
* ¼ glass white wine<br><br>
* 2 leeks, sliced<br><br><br><br>
Method...<br><br><br><br>
1. Boil the rice in lightly salted water until cooked through, then drain.<br><br>
2. In a pan, heat the oil and fry the celery and leeks until softened and beginning to turn golden.<br><br>
3. Add the mushrooms, a little salt and cook for a few minutes before adding the wine.<br><br>
4. Cook until the wine has almost gone, then add in the tomatoes and cook for a few more minutes.<br><br>
5. Add in the cooked rice, the sultanas and the grated carrot and mix well.<br><br><br><br>
Maybe serve with...<br><br><br><br>
You could eat this on its own or combine it with the lemon dressed salad and the minted courgettes or minted sugar snap peas.<br><br><br><br>
For those able to eat wheat...<br><br><br><br>
Serve with thinly sliced wholemeal bread and dairy-free spread.<br><br><br><br>
Good luck<br><br><br><br>
Dame xx
 

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The easiest, quickest meals I've found have been stir fry.<br><br><br><br>
I generally chop up my favorite veggies and cook them in some olive oil. I'll throw on some ginger terriyaki sauce and there ya go. Simple <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> Sometimes I'll add some seitan or tofu.<br><br><br><br>
Smoothies are also very easy. Chop up your favorite fruit and throw them in a blender and voila, a yummy breakfast <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
And sometimes I won't have time and cheat by toasting some bread, throwing some veggenaise, flax seeds, ketchup, tofutti cheese, and then add an amy's burger to it <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/blush.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":eek:"> Add some pretzels and you have a yummy lunch though I'm sure it's not as good for you as fruits/veggies <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
Red beans and rice is pretty easy. Again if I'm in a rush I'll just get the 10 minute boil in bag brown rice and a can of vegan red beans (or butter beans) and nuke em <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
There's plenty of easy recipes or easy dinners if you need them.
 

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Cheapest, quickest and easiest "recipe" I have... heat up an ordinary tin of baked beans, adding 1/2 tsp chilli powder for an easy bean chilli. Serve with a baked potato, brown rice or quinoa, and fresh fruit juice for vitamin c. (if you have more time fry an onion, crushed garlic and bell pepper in olive oil before adding the beans)<br><br><br><br>
I also like stir-fry's, esp tofu stir fry's.. marinade some tofu in soy sauce and crushed fresh garlic and ginger(or alternatively buy ready marinated stuff from a healthfood store), fry it using olive oil(healthiest thing for this! keeps your omega ratio good) with onions and crushed garlic, then when it's nice and crispy and golden brown add some mixed veg, ie beansprouts, peppers, mushrooms, water chestnuts.. you can usually buy mixed packs of stir fry veg in most supermarkets! Add a little soy sauce and serve with brown rice or quinoa. 1 pack tofu serves 2-3<br><br><br><br>
Curry! Fry 1 onion and 1 clove garlic in olive oil, plus any veg you are adding (aubergine, peppers, courgette etc all work well) or tofu, then add a can of chopped tomatos, 4 tbsp curry paste(i like pataks) and add any drained, canned legumes or veg(chickpeas, peas, sweetcorn or green lentils work well) and serve with quinoa, rice or chappattis. I just use whatever I have in the house for as many ppl as I'm cooking for- this keeps in a tupperware box in the fridge if you have leftovers, to be reheated the next day!<br><br><br><br>
Hope some of these ideas help!
 

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I would for the sake of convenience. go to the produce section of the supermarket and get either the premixed salad bags along with carrots tomatoes, onions, garlic, celery, etc. and some salad dressing you prefer and have a salad at least once a day.<br><br>
Next go to the frozen food section (unless you can find them fresh in the produce section of your store). and buy frozen veggies, not forgetting the bean variety, you should be able to find several types of beans (legumes), as beans are a good place to get most of youir protein. Buy some good whole wheat bread (vegan of course). You might have to look hard to find them but there there. Make some toast, get some soy based butter. Most raisen brand cereals are a good way to start breakfast until you find more items. Peanut butter and jelly is a good start for lunch items.<br><br><br><br>
You need to take some vitamines like B12.<br><br><br><br>
I would stronly suggest you embark upon the study of vegan eating.<br><br>
It will be a worthwhile journey. Along the way you will discover some many neat and unique food items and recipies.<br><br>
I am still on my journey of discovery today being 8 months and 1 day. a Vegan, and it is so exciting to become so much more aware of ones, food enviornment, and misconseptions of the world we live in. I tell people with conviction about my life style changes, because it has become that exciting for me, with all the new found knowledge i have learned.<br><br><br><br>
So I would like to wish you well on your journey, and may the happiness of discovery go with you.
 

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I'd recommend buying a couple of cook books. I'm in my second year of uni here in England and having the recipe books to flick through makes a difference. Also, I can do it quite cheaply without compromising on quality now I've got the hang of it.<br><br><br><br>
Here's one of my faves:<br><br>
Get vegetables like aubergines, courgettes, peppers, onions and add some garlic as well (not too much) and roast them in olive oil. Have the oven on at c200ish, Gas Mark 6 for about half an hour.<br><br><br><br>
Serve on top of either quinoa, pasta or rice.<br><br><br><br>
Do enough for two days and save some time for the next day.
 

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kanity, thanks for your detailed and honest reply. It helps a lot. I hope you've resolved some of the issues that were affecting your eating habits (it sounds like some have been) though I still feel like you should talk to <i>someone</i>, even if you don't starve/binge anymore.<br><br><br><br>
The whole bingeing/purging cycle is NOT something to be brushed off as a phase or something you've 'outgrown' (I know you didn't say that) Just know it's something that can happen again or be triggered when you least expect it and get out of control SO easily...having the extra back up of a professional keeping an eye on you is a good thing.<br><br><br><br>
OK, lecture over - I'm not sure if the above posts and recipe ideas are detailed enough, or will give you any ideas but they're a start.<br><br><br><br>
I would also recommend getting a couple vegan cookbooks that have color photographs. (You might want to start another thread for that? I don't know what ones to recommend specifically) They are usually inspiring just because they're pretty to look at, AND give you some idea on what the finished dish will look like AND usually have at least a little information on vegan eating and nutrition. (Maybe ask parents for one for Christmas?).<br><br><br><br>
It sounds like you do get some vegetables/salads with the meals your parents cook. That's good.<br><br><br><br>
So how about a pasta dish to start with?<br><br><br><br>
1.) Buy some packages of whatever type (plain, dry) pasta noodles appeal to you (spaghetti, elbow macaroni, shells, rigatoni, whatever...). If you can find whole wheat pasta, all the better!<br><br>
2.) Follow the directions on the package, cook the pasta, and then make the following recipe. (I like this one because there are a TON of variations, they all taste good and it's easy).<br><br><br><br>
PASTA WITH VEGGIES<br><br><br><br>
INGREDIENTS<br><br>
½ cup pine nuts <i>(OR pecans, walnuts or cashews, chopped)</i><br><br>
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil<br><br>
2 garlic cloves, finely minced or crushed in a garlic press<br><br>
½ pound thin asparagus, cut diagonally into 1-ich pieces<br><br><i>(OR brocolli, zucchini cut into thin strips, carrots, mushrooms or green beans OR a combo of whatever)</i><br><br>
1/2 cup canned garbanzo beans, rinsed well - also called ceci beans or chickpeas (OR use white beans, black beans or kidney beans)<br><br>
1 pound pasta (or enough for about 3 normal size servings)<br><br>
2 tablespoons minced fresh dill, parsley or basil<br><br>
Zest and juice of one fresh lemon<br><br>
Salt and freshly-ground black pepper<br><br><br><br>
1. Lightly toast the nuts in a dry skillet over medium heat until golden brown, watch them carefully!! about 1 to 2 minutes. Transfer the nuts to a small bowl and set aside.<br><br><br><br>
2. Put the olive oil in the skillit. Add the garlic and asparagus (or whatever vegetable you choose), and cook about 2 - 4 minutes. Add the beans, cook more until veggies are slightly tender and beans are heated thru, about 2 to 5 minutes more.<br><br><br><br>
3. When the pasta is cooked, drain it and place it in a large serving bowl with the veggies, beans and nuts.<br><br><br><br>
4. Add the remaining olive oil, the dill (or herb of your choice), lemon zest, and lemon juice. Season with salt and pepper to taste and toss gently to combine. Serve immediately.<br><br><br><br>
My kids make variations on this every chance they get. They especially like a combo of brocolli with white beans and peanuts. Sometimes they skip the lemon juice and sprinkle the whole thing lightly with sesame oil and soy sauce instead.<br><br>
Or they often add some chopped fresh tomatos and more fresh herbs and garlic.<br><br><br><br>
Is that at all helpful? Too detailed? Let me know. I'll post more later.
 

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Heylo, these are some books that I would recommend.<br><br>
This is great if you are cooking on your own - it even gives weekly shopping lists! Helpful, if you're me and get confused easy.<br><br><a href="http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=veggieboards.com-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.co.uk%2FVegan-Cooking-One-Simple-Appetizing%2Fdp%2F0722539231%2Fsr%3D8-1%2Fqid%3D1164838726%2Fref%3Dpd_ka_1%2F202-6435043-4232663%3Fie%3DUTF8%26s%3Dbooks" target="_blank">http://www.amazon.co.uk/Vegan-Cookin...e=UTF8&s=books</a><br><br><br><br>
This is all really healthy stuff (even the puddings at the back!) and the woman is aussie. Some of the recipies require a little modification (imho), but just have a go and enjoy.<br><br><a href="http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=veggieboards.com-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.co.uk%2FVegan-Cookbook-Mouthwatering-Recipes-Occasions%2Fdp%2F0600609154%2Fsr%3D1-17%2Fqid%3D1164838786%2Fref%3Dsr_1_17%2F202-6435043-4232663%3Fie%3DUTF8%26s%3Dbooks" target="_blank">http://www.amazon.co.uk/Vegan-Cookbo...e=UTF8&s=books</a><br><br><br><br>
And I'm going through the same ed/non ed thing that you are, I think. Glad to see that you have started to overcome it and I hope you enjoy eating again!<br><br><br><br>
pirate x
 

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Pasta is always a super easy thing. Just make the noodles like normal, saute' some veggies (heat oil on med-high and stir around some chopped up/diced veggies like onion, garlic, tomato, peppers... until they are cooked through) then pour the jarred sauce over the veggies. Voila! Chunky veggie sauce on your favorite pasta sauce. Add basil, oregano, thyme if you like.~ Can have a small salad on the side if you like, or didn't use many veggies in the sauce.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Yay, lots of replies <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D"><br><br><br><br>
I do have a cookbook but it's a vegetarian one, not vegan, so most of the recipes involve eggs/butter/cheese. I'll look into getting one or two vegan cookbooks for christmas; "vegan recipes for one" sounds really suitable, thanks piratemoon for suggesting it.<br><br><br><br>
Today I tried the veggies with pasta recipe which Tofu-N-Sprouts posted. At the supermarket, I found some "wholemeal" spaghetti and used it; I assume it's the same thing as whole wheat spaghetti? For the vegetables, I used carrots+broccoli+asparagus+zucchini instead of just asparagus. I used too many chickpeas as I had to estimate how many to soak before I went and bought measuring cups, and didn't think of using the cups afterwards. The vegetable mix ended up being about 50% chickpeas (which probably weren't soaked for long enough, they tasted a bit dry and were kinda hard) and pine nuts (which came out well). The end result tasted quite good despite the overabundance of chickpeas, especially with the zucchini and asparagus, which absorbed the olive oil and lemon and turned mushy and sweet; they tasted really great, I'd never tasted anything like it before <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> And I have a full extra bowl left for lunch tomorrow. For dinner tomorrow, I might try the risotto. Thanks to everyone else who posted too, I'm positive I'll be making use of the super quick and easy recipes in the near future.<br><br><br><br>
Vegan Joe, thanks for the advice. I read a little bit about vegan nutritional requirements before I decided to become one, so I've been taking 1tbsp of flaxseed oil a day (cold, with soymilk), and 250µg of b12 through a supplement. Are there any other nutrients that you really need to make sure you're getting as a vegan? I tried to find a DHA supplement at my health food shop but they didn't have any; I hope I can live without one for the time being. I've been pretty tired lately, but I put that down to low calorie intake due to not knowing what to feed myself and being generally anxious about food and cooking, hence the existence of this thread.<br><br><br><br>
For quite a few years now (dating back to when I started to become anorexic, hehe <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/bigcry.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":cry:">) I've been going on evening runs 4-5 times a week which usually last around 20 minutes, in addition to riding my bicycle everywhere. Actually, I honestly don't know how long the runs take because I've never timed myself, but they're definitely 5+ km with no breaks. I'm not in a club or run races or anything, but I enjoy doing these runs and I'd like to keep them up. Maybe I'll even become a bit more serious about it next year and join a running club after I move for university. Is there anything in particular I should be keeping in mind for my diet with regards to my running, apart from making sure I get enough protein? How much protein is enough?<br><br><br><br>
I see vegannaise getting mentioned a lot on these forums, but I don't know if you can buy it in Australia. I think I'll go and ask at Woolworths and Coles if they stock any, and risk receiving a weird look <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/sweatdrop.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":sweat:">. I think I'd really like it, because when I was a vegetarian, one of my favourite things to make was wholemeal toast with vegemite + sprouts + tomato + pickles + lettuce + mayonnaise <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/lick.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":lick:">... oh look, I do like food after all <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/shy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":shy:">
 

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First, <a href="http://www.vegweb.com" target="_blank">www.vegweb.com</a> is amazing for recipes.<br><br><br><br>
My favourite thing to make lately is roasted veggies with tofu. The "instructions" more or less:<br><br><br><br>
1. Any veggies you've got - garlic, onion, peppers, broccoli, cauliflower, zuccinni, beets, carrots, potato, yam, eggplant, etc.<br><br>
2. Cut 'em up and toss 'em in a bowl<br><br>
3. Cube some firm tofu and add that<br><br>
4. Add a tablespoon or two of olive oil, a few splashes of balsamic vinegar, lots of cumin, a bit of cayenne, salt, pepper, garlic powder, Bragg's, and mix it all up with the vegetables. They should be fairly well-coated with a liquid.<br><br>
5. Throw them on a baking sheet and put them in the oven, around 400 degrees, for half an hour or so.<br><br><br><br>
You can do alot of variations on this recipe...try just olive oil, rosemary, salt, and pepper...mmm.
 

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I love risotto! Great tasting and easy. Chick peas should be soaked for 12 hours and then boil them for a couple of hours or so.<br><br><br><br>
Have a look at the <a href="http://www.vegansociety.com/html/food/nutrition/" target="_blank">Vegan Society nutrition pages</a> for more info on vitamins and minerals and supplements.<br><br><br><br>
Also, you could ask the other Aussies in the <a href="http://www.veggieboards.com/boards/showthread.php?t=5508" target="_blank">Local Foums</a> on these boards about what items are available where. I've never seen Vegennaise in the UK, but we do have Plamil non-daiy mayonnaise, which I really like.
 

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Here's one I came up with, and my fiance and I absolutely love it!<br><br><br><br>
2 cans black beans (rinsed and drained)<br><br>
2 chopped tomatoes<br><br>
1/2 chopped white onion<br><br>
1 chopped fresh jalepeno<br><br>
1/2 cup salsa<br><br><br><br>
We mix it all together, and I eat it with a side of avocado (my fiance doesn't like avocado, but I think it MAKES the meal). Might also be good with tortilla chips, or wrapped in a soft whole wheat tortilla.
 

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This is an easy Peanut butter noodle sauce for noodles or with rice.<br><br><br><br>
I like to add steamed veggies on the side and beans.<br><br><br><br>
1 tablespoon peanutbutter<br><br>
dash of soy sauce<br><br>
1/2 teaspon garlic powder<br><br>
1/4 cup of water<br><br>
dashes of salt, parsely, cumin, black pepper, and chili powder<br><br><br><br>
Mix all of this into a bowl and pour over hot noodles/ rice/ steamed carrots/ on a tortilla with veggies and a boca burger.<br><br><br><br>
*drools* I just had some last night with a baked potato and veggies... hmmmmmm<br><br><br><br>
ALWAYS PAIR THIS WITH A GLASS OF SOYMILK! <--- PB and milk is the best!
 

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Here's a recipe for my favorite soup:<br><br><br><br><a href="http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Fresh-Asparagus-Soup/Detail.aspx" target="_blank">http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Fresh-A...up/Detail.aspx</a><br><br><br><br>
I typed out some modifications under Reviews. Here's what I wrote:<br><br><br><br>
This is the best soup recipe I have ever found. It took me about 3 tried to get it just right. The first time it was very stringy (used too much of the asparagus bottom) and the second time it had flour lumps in it (make sure flour is desolved before bringing to a boil). I bought the asparagus ready to use (the bottoms cut off) at Trader Joe's. That fixed the stringy problem. I also used a steamer to cook the asparagus (for about 12 minutes) and the onions (threw them in at about 6 minutes). From there, I put that into the blender with 1/2-3/4 c. vegetable broth. Everytime I make it, it's gone by the end of the day. My family loves it and so do my co-workers.<br><br><br><br>
I've never made it vegan before, but I plan to next time I make it. The only non-Vegan thing I added was yogurt because I couldn't find plain soy. Enjoy! It's easy to make.
 

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If you can buy soya mince where you are, spaghetti bolognese is fairly quick and easy. Chop and fry an onion, then add a tin of tomatoes, some soya mince, a bit of water and a stock cube, bring to the boil and then simmer for about 15-20 minutes. Then cook some spaghetti (preferably wholemeal). You can add other things to the bolognese, such as herbs, tomato puree, carrots, mushrooms, peas or peppers.
 
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