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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've always wanted to run marathons. Problem is that I couldn't breath when I ran because of smoking, plus I'm a little overweight. Well, since quiting smoking I've notice that I don't get winded at all anymore. I figure I can loose weight while training to do what I've always wanted to do. I want to start getting in shape and physically up to the task of running in the annual marathon we have here in town in the spring. Definitely won't be ready in 2003 so I want to shoot for 2004. It's winter here so starting outside is out of the question. I don't have a treadmill and since the b/f is laid off right now don't have extra $ to go to a gym.<br><br><br><br>
What should I be doing now to get ready to start running in the spring when the weather breaks? How should I prepare myself in the meantime? Any tips from diet to stretching to excercises would be much appreciated. What about shoes? Any suggestions for running shoes?<br><br><br><br>
Oh thank you, thank you , thank you for your input! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D">
 

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Well, gee, I'm not the one to give advice based on personal experience, but I do have some thoughts.<br><br><br><br>
Any aerobic exercise, particularly any based on using your legs, would be good, IMHO. So if you don't have money but can go to a mall, just mall walk. Maybe you can go when it is not crowded and walk at a fairly brisk pace. You should be able to build up your legs and lungs that way without braving the winter cold. The other thing that comes to mind is stair climbing. Get some of Kenneth Cooper's books on aerobics out of the library and go through the list of possible aerobic exercises.<br><br><br><br>
I am not knowledgable about shoes, although I think I recall that walking shoes are very different from running shoes.<br><br><br><br>
Oprah Winfrey prepared for and ran a marathon. I believe that she and her trainer wrote a book on the subject. Might be worth reading. I think it is called <b>Make the Connection</b>.<br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=veggieboards.com-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2Fexec%2Fobidos%2Ftg%2Fdetail%2F-%2F0786882980%2Fqid%3D1040949929%2Fsr%3D1-3%2Fref%3Dsr_1_3%2F102-0566789-6724958%3Fv%3Dglance%26s%3Dbooks" target="_blank">http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...roduct-details</a>
 

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Hey MsRuthie, I think that's great you want to run a marathon. I've was a long distance runner for years and have completed a bunch of marathons. First thing I would recommend is to begin where you are now, and don't worry about how you will manage to run 26,2 miles. Proper training is very systematic, it's about learning to brake through mental boundries and the limiting beliefs that physically hold us back. Challenging those limitations a little at a time will give you the experience of knowing how much more capable you can choice to be. Once you experience something, you can intergrate it into the story of who you are. You become your experience on a cellular level. But remember you have to do it a little at a time because first you have to believe you can do something, then you do it and become it. The reason you couldn't do a marathon this coming spring has more to do with your belief that you can't do it then any physical limitation. Your physical body follows your mental belief.<br><br>
Get outside and start walking! learn to make the less comfortable choice. If there is a foot of snow out there, learn to to see it as an a way to build muscles and endurance, not as a reason to hold yourself back.<br><br>
Find someone to train with. Is this something your boyfriend would be willing to do with you? Join a running club, or find a friend to do it with. It's twice as hard to train by yourself, you'll need a lot of support when you find yourself in those moments of self doubt, when it all seems so hard, or impossible. We all have those moments, and it makes a big difference when your able to borrow someone elses faith. Plus, it's fun to obsess over running with someone who is as consumed with it as you.<br><br>
The bottom line is I know you can run a marathon if you want to, and I would love to help you with any questions or moral support . Good luck!
 

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MsR- That is awesome. When you do it, I'll be waving to you as you run by. (And maybe I'll do it too, someday.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Baby..I'm going to start this weekend..Saturday morning to be exact. I think I'll go walking and see how far I can get in a set amount of time. Like, I'll walk for 1/2 hour at a gradually building pace and then I'll turn right around and go back the same way I came at a steady fast pace gradually slowing. I should be able to strengthen my lungs, leg muscles, and build endurance this way, right? If I do this at least 3 times a week and maybe do some light free weight twice a week is that enough? Maybe I should just stay at that level for a while until begins to not feel so challenging anymore and then I'll take it up a notch. When the spring comes, I should be strong enough to start the running piece I think.
 

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If you're like me (heaven help you if you are <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> ) the secret to running distance is a good MP3 player. No, seriously, I ride stationary and I get SOOOO bored without some good tunes. When I have a good set loaded up, I don't notice the time passing.<br><br><br><br>
As for shoes, all I have to say is that you usually do get what you pay for. A $100 pair of News or Saucony are well worth the investment.
 

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Whoo hoo. Perhaps we should get a training topic together for medium-long distance runners/walkers?** My post-surgury recovery goal is to do a half (or at least be able to do a half) by the end of this year.<br><br><br><br>
A must-read person for starters is John "The Penguin" Bingham (<a href="http://www.waddle-on.com/" target="_blank">http://www.waddle-on.com/</a>) who makes some good points.<br><br><br><br>
1. Anyone can start from scratch and do marathon in a year by simply increasing distance 10% a week. (The 10% rule is very important. More than 10% and you risk injury.)<br><br><br><br>
2. Your goal is just to cover 26 miles in under 6 hours. Some crazy people do it walking.<br><br><br><br>
3. Listen to your body. Overtraining is as much of a problem as undertraining.<br><br><br><br>
** I'm one of those crazy walkers myself, dislike running with a vengance but will gladly walk marathon distance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So cool KJS, so cool. This thread could be used for training walkers/runners, right? Or we could start a new one. I like the 10% rule. I definitely don't want to injure myself and throw everything out the window up to that point. Do you run or walk or both? When I was a kid, running felt so free to me. I ran everywhere..no exaggeration. But as I got older, well you know.<br><br><br><br>
Anyhow, I guess running seems so appealing to me because of the good feeling I used to get from it when I was a kid. Understanding that running is very demanding on the body, I want to do it right from the beginning. I appreciate the tips <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D">
 

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I hate to be the skunk at the garden party, but walking a half-hour out and then another half-hour back may be way too much to start out with.<br><br><br><br>
I have one book on walking for exercise that basically says people should start out by walking for ten minutes at a moderate pace. Then walk every other day (or at least three times a week), adding a minute each session until you build up to half-an-hour or so. Then you can walk more briskly and add more time and distance.<br><br><br><br>
Here are the Kenneth Cooper Walking and Running exercise programs from his <b>The Aerobics Program for Total Well-Being</b>.<br><br><br><br><img alt="" src="http://www.mindspring.com/~joeshedlock/aerobics.jpg" style="border:0px solid;"><br><br><br><br>
He has a pretty good fitness program, plus since he has this aerobic fitness points system, you can vary your exercises as long as you get the recommended number of points. He recommends 35 or more points per week for the general population, and 50 to 60 (or more) per week for those seeking excellent fitness (athletes and would-be marathon runners).<br><br><br><br>
By the way, you can get a good pedometer at Brookstone for about $15.<br><br><br><br>
If you take the more gradual approach, your goal for the first month would be to build up your leg muscles so you will avoid injury. You should also check your feet carefully after each exercise session and learn to deal with things like (avoiding) blisters, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Wow, I've just renamed you 'Joe Cool' <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/cool3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":cool:"> Those are great charts. I'm over motivated and need to keep in mind to go in moderation so's not to injure anything.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by Tsila</i><br><br><b>I have no advice but just wanted to say that I think it's great that you're doing this.</b></div>
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Thanks. It's on my list of things to do before I die along with about 30 other things <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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i'd say you can train at home by doing lots of stretching exercises, leg raises to help tone leg muscle and abs, if you have stairs in your house you can run up and down the stairs a few times a day, just be careful not to fall <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)"> jumping jacks, jumping rope to get your heartrate up and build up endurance (do it for longer and longer stretches, stop whenever you get out of breath)<br><br><br><br>
just make sure while you do all that to practice your breathing
 

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As far as I know, correct breathing is the same in vocal performance as it is in sports. The very first thing my voice teacher ever taught me was how to breathe. Don't breathe from your shoulders and chest, breathe by expanding your lungs downward. Remember those old-time singers who put their hands just in front of their bellies in that really unnatural position? That's to remind them to breathe by pushing their bellies in and out, not shoving their shoulders up and down.<br><br><br><br>
Also, breathe through your nose as much as practical. Those nose hairs are there for a reason, and you just don't get as much ick filtered out of your air if you breathe through your mouth.<br><br><br><br>
Yes, 1/2 hour starting sessions isn't a good idea. I tried getting into running, but the longest sustained time that I made it running was 5 minutes on a treadmill. Right now I am much too busy with work and far away from the free exercise equipment at school, so I am not working on any running goals.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
We have local YMCAs that have scholarship programs for people who don't have enough money to join. I joined for only $10. per month and was a full member, got to use everything and they have quite a bit. I don't know if this is everywhere but it is worth looking into. They also have staff there that help you learn whatever you want to. Best wishes with the marathon! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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Yay for the YMCA! I took swimming lessons through them for 9 years through their program for homeschoolers. I didn't take their lifeguarding course because it was so expensive and they gave no leeway on when you had to be in class. I have had other summer jobs.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by MsRuthieB</i><br><br><b>Wow, I've just renamed you 'Joe Cool' <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/cool3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":cool:"><br><br>
Those are great charts.</b></div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
Flattery will get you everywhere (with me). <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D"><br><br><br><br>
Cooper has formulas for determining aerobic points for walking and running. Unfortunately, these are hard to express in ASCII text. So I've put the Walking Formula (for distances over 1 mile at speeds of 6 MPH or under) into a spreadsheet (*.WK1 format) that should import into any spreadsheet application.<br><br><br><br>
I have started the week on Sunday and ended on Saturday. Saturdays should be color-coded to indicate the end/total for the week, but I think this color-coding got stripped out somehow.<br><br><br><br>
I am still working on the running formula. Let me know if this sort of thing would be useful to you.
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