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I recently attended a wedding reception with a Jamaican theme. One of the side dishes served was plantains. I have never had them before and they were so good! They looked to have been prepared in a skillet possibly but they were not greasy at all. They were almost a bit dry and may have been salted?? They tasted like a dry potato or squash.

Is this how plantains are always prepared? How would I fix them myself to get this type of texture and taste?

Thanks!
 

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i'm not positive if this is right since i haven't tried to make them yet, but the recipe i got from my sister is to cook them in a skillet with olive oil. then pat them dry with paper towels and salt
pretty simple. let me know how it turns out!
 

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Plantains taste drastically different at various ripening stages so it's best to decide which you like best first.

Plantains start out green turn slightly yellowish with black spots, ultimately turning completely black. The greener they are the firmer and drier the flesh will be, more like a potato or taro root. When they're yellowish they are slightly softer, a bit sweeter with a "tang." When they're black they are sweet and delicious.

At any stage you can peel them, slice them up and shallow fry them in any skillet, using any type of cooking oil you like, then drain them on paper towels. They go especially well with a plate of black beans and rice.

When plantains are black-ish you can bake them in their skins (slit them with a knife a few times) at about 350 F for 20 minutes or so. They turn into delicious pudding.
 

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I always buy my fried plantains already bagged up (like potato chips) at the grocery store. They taste like pringles to me!
 

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I knew a Samoan boy who's family would buy the greenest bananas they could find and use them like potatoes. They used to serve their bananas with butter, along with cornbeef and cabbage...quite tastey.

Anyone know about a vegan cornbeef substitute?
 

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My ex-wife is from Cameroon. Ripe plantains are fried in oil and not salted. They come out fairly sweet and not very crispy. Usually served with a very oily tomato/onion sauce.

Green plantains are baked and used plain as the starchy dish to accompany many meals, like white rice and potatoes are used in other cuisines.
 

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I've never heard of a vegan corned beef substitute but I bet you could make a good one with tofu or seitan. Corned beef is made by marinating beef in brine and various spices for a few days then boiling it for several hours. The taste has very little to do with the meat.

Hmm... perhaps a good candidate for a future recipe club? Assuming we can find enough people who remember/care what it tastes like
 

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i love plantains- quizeen had it right on the money. Most likely the type you had was right before the black stage. You can slice them diagonally and dip them in flour before frying- it gives the plantian a wonderful crunch- or if you like them to be mushier, leave out the flour, either way its really good.
 

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:
rool:: I'm soooo hungry right now!

I either bake them in thier skins, if they are just before the black stage.

1. Slit the skin down the middle

2.. Pre heat the oven to 350.

3. Place plaintains on cookie sheet and bake until soft and warm.

You can also slice and shallow fry just like everyone else said!!
 

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PLANTAINS! Oh why didn't I see this before! We eat plantains (platanos) every week in my family! They taste really good when they're green, boiled in lightly salted water then drizzled with onions and peppers that have been sauteed in oil. Yummy! I think what you ate was what my culture calls 'tostones'.

Basically you slice the green plantain until you have about five to seven slices and fry them until they brown a bit. Then you flatten them. The way I do it is to put them on a plate and press another plate on top. That way they flatten to look like little ovals or disks. Put them back in the hot oil until crispy, lightly salt and serve. Really good with ketchup. You can do this with ripe (yellow) plantains as well but you can skip the flattening part. Since they're soft they don't need to be flat.
 

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i bought some last week and i'm planning on cooking them tomorrow. i'm very exctied and a little bit afraid lol

i get excited over the shilliest crap ..... like a new vegetable ....
 

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I know a wonderful Indian way to prepare plantains although since I never measure anything the amounts I use are estimates and you may have to play with it a bit.

I like to use the plantains when they are slightly ripe. Basically when the skin begins to yellow so that the fruit is a bit sweet and not so starchy in texture.

2 plantains, diced

ginger powder

1/4 c raw cashews

1/4 t toasted cumin seeds

pinch of turmeric

chili powder-use an amount to suite your taste

1/2-3/4 c yogurt (or sub with soy yogurt)

salt to taste

3-4 sprigs of fresh chopped cilantro

Pan fry the plantains in a bit of oil. Sprinkle a bit of ginger powder on the plantains. Meanwhile, blend together the remaining ingredients except the cilantro. Be sure to grind up the cashews well. The consistency of the mix will be pretty liquidy. When the plantains are cooked, add the blend. Keep the heat on low at this point so the yogurt doesn't break. Stir til the sauce thickens. Remove from heat and add cilantro. Yum. I want some now!
 
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