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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, I'd always wanted a manual camera and now that I finally have one, I have NO idea how to set my ISO and aperture. The last set of pictures I took (the band shots) were totally washed out by the flash. Is anyone here knowledgeable in this area?

Tomorrow, I'm wanting to take pictures of my husband's 30th birthday. I'm taking him for his first flight lesson (it's a surprise). I want to take pictures of him standing outside the plane (outside shot) and some of him sitting in the cockpit (not outside, but not very dark, either) and then later, I will want to take pictures of him inside the restaurant where we're having the whole family and friend get-together thingy. I'm wondering if I set my aperture at 125 and the ring at 8 if that will cut it for all three? And if so, what do I set the ISO at? My film speed is 400. I thought I'd gotten 200 but when I got home, found out I'd gotten 400 :-\\

Please Help!

TIA!!!
 

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Film production and development is hazardous to the environment and your health. Is it too late to exchange for digital?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
epski!!! *L* :p You're NOT helping! (But I love ya anyway!)

I have a digi. It's only a 1.3 megapixel :p I need to upgrade, huh?
 

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As a quick fix until someone else posts:

Of the same shot (ex: standing outside plane)

Take multiple pictures with different settings

Have someone else take pictures with the digital

And do the same for every other one.

Have the camera's film saved to CD (unless you do it yourself).Buy or use something like Photoshop Elements (under $100) to fix the photos.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
JLR ... you're sweet!

I've thought about all of this. I have PhotoShop already. If something is too over-exposed or too under-exposed, you can only do so much in PS.

I guess I will take my digi. I still have my old automatic, too. *sighs* I just wanna know how to use my camera correctly. Maybe I can find a night course or something.

Thx!
 

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If you do a search online, you may find some tutorials... not sure if they'd help though. MSN had a tutorial a few months back, but not sure if it's still up (although it'd be free!).

Good luck.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by MoonDansyr

I've thought about all of this. I have PhotoShop already. If something is too over-exposed or too under-exposed, you can only do so much in PS.
SHIFT-CTRL-L = Auto-adjust levels. A timesaver and a half!

A really quick two cents on (non-flash) lens settings:

Higher aperture settings: GOOD: More light getting into the lens. BAD: The depth of field is smaller, meaning if you use a high f-stop, only what you focus on will be in focus. Not ALWAYS a problem.

Higher (slower) exposure settings: GOOD: lets more light in without reducing the depth of field. BAD: The lens stays open longer, so if anyone is moving, motion blur!

Film speed: 400 is a good all-around speed. If you're only shooting outdoor/sunny, lower speeds = better prints.

As for the flash, well, that's much more than two cents-worth of typing!
 

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What kind of camera is it?

All manual?

Manual/auto?

Do you know the basics of what aperatures and shutter settings do? A 22 aperature setting lets very little light in. An 8 setting lets more in. (The numbers are all fractions, meaning "22" eguals "1/22", so larger numbers mean less light hits the film.

Similarly, shutter speeds are fractions of a second. 1000 (or 1/1000) is fast, letting little light get in. 4 (or 1/4, or a quarter of a second) lets in much more light.

For flashes, a shutter speed of "60" or "1/60" is usually good.

---Trav---
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by MyOwnPath

What kind of camera is it?

All manual?

Manual/auto?

Do you know the basics of what aperatures and shutter settings do? A 22 aperature setting lets very little light in. An 8 setting lets more in. (The numbers are all fractions, meaning "22" eguals "1/22", so larger numbers mean less light hits the film.

Similarly, shutter speeds are fractions of a second. 1000 (or 1/1000) is fast, letting little light get in. 4 (or 1/4, or a quarter of a second) lets in much more light.

For flashes, a shutter speed of "60" or "1/60" is usually good.

---Trav---
Yes, I *think* I understand that fairly well - - so if I'm taking the picture OUTSIDE the plane, I'd want a higher setting (like I said ~125 or maybe even 250?) and once we're inside the plane, reduce it ... and then reduce it more inside the restaurant... right? This is all with a flash.

But now, what about the aperture ring settings? 11? 8?

And just when I think I'm understanding the aperture stuff ... ISO has me totally confused. I know that you're supposed to change it according to the film speed when it is doubled ... but then how do I figure THIS when I've figured my aperture and taken my film speed into consideration? Do I just pretend like I don't really HAVE a film speed when I'm setting the aperture and set it according to my light and then set my ISO according to my film speed? And would that be at a -2? (for 400 speed?)

Thanks for your feedback, Trav. I *really* wanna get this stuff down because I *love* photography!

Oh yeah, it's a Pentax ZX-M. It auto-forwards.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by FafaFrappy

Did anyone else glance over The Veggie Patch and read, "Pornography Questions?"
Actually, yes, I did and it was MY original post *L* However, I was half asleep this morning when I opened up everything to read :p
 

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Moon, one of my cameras is a Pentax K1000, which is like your camera's brother. I have a decent 150-page book that offers the basics of getting to know your camera, and figuring out what settings are right for whatever you're doing. It's yours if you want to pay shipping.


And, as far as aperatures go: Smaller aperatures allow more of the photo to be in focus...

If a person is sitting by the edge of a lake and a boat is passing in the distance, you can set a small aperature (such as 22 or 1/22) if you want both subjects to be in foces. But if you want just the person to be in focus, set a large aperature (such as 8 or 1/8) and the background will be fuzzy.

You should have a light meter on the right side of the viewfinder when you look through it. It's just a little line that goes up and down on a scale. When the settings are letting just enough light in, the line will be in the middle of the scale.

So, first you set either the shutter speed (depending on if you are photographing a still or moving object) -OR- you shut the aperature (depending on how muchof the photo you want in focus)...

Then, let's say, if you set your shutter speed to a desired setting, you can look through the viewfinder at your light meter and adjust your aperature ring until the light meter balances in the middle.

Got it? Good.


---Trav-
 

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Firstly .... what camera is this? ... is it an SLR?

I'll just add some more hopefully helpful babblings
(the following assumes you have a manual SLR camera .... the loop and needle light metre may vary on different cameras)

As for the ASA (or ISO), that is important to set according to what the film says. If it is a 400 speed film , you must set the camera ISO or ASA setting to 400. If you don't , it will through off everything the camera tells you with the light metre.

If you are going to be shooting in dim light conditions, a 400 or even 800 speed film is better (it's more sensitive but generally grainier). Under good lighting, 100 or less will give better pics but require more light or longer exposures)

Here's a copy of two old photos of mine showing how different a scene can look according to the focal ratio ( f number on the lens, adjusted with the ring on a lens). They were taken at the same time but using different focal ratio settings for the 50mm lens.

http://www.dkingdesign.com/photos/fl...omparison..jpg

The sharper one on the left was taken with a 50mm lens at focal ratio f 16 (using a Canon FTb SLR all-manual body ... it was built several months before I was born! I got it second or third hand in the 90's ..hehe). This means the aperture (which means diameter of the opening for light to get through ) for the lens will be stopped down so it's 1/16th the size that the lens's focal length (focal ratio = lens focal length divided by the lens aperture ... the lens for these pics had a focal length of 50mm) is ... ie, a very small opening (about 4mm in this case). This means that less light will get in and therefore will underexpose under dim lighting (unless you use a tripod and set a longer exposure to collect more light onto the film). It also allows things at shorter and longer distances from the camera to be in focus all at once (ie, the sharpness in the left photo)

The one on the right was taken with the lens focal ratio at f 1.8. This means the lens aperture was left fully open on this lens. Much more light got through onto the film so the exposure would have been much shorter than for the one mentioned above. It also has the effect of making only a very narrow distance from the camera in focus at one time (so closer and more distant things won't be in focus while a certain distance will be).

Using different apertures (set with the focal ratioring on the lens) is useful when you want things to be all in focus or maybe a background out of focus. But if you set it to f16 (for example, lens settings vary), then you will need a longer exposure to get enough light to expose everything correctly.

Does your camera have a light metre? (visible in the view finder) My old Canon has a needle that moves up and down depending on the light being sensed from what you are pointing at. It also has a loop that will go up and down as you set different focal ratios on the camera lens. Basically, you need to set the exposure and then the f-ratio so the loop and needle line up (varies depending on camera). Or set the desired f-ratio then set the expoure to balance the needle and loop (or equivelant metre on your camera)

As for exposures, a general rule for maximum exposure times for hand held cameras is

"take the focal length in millimetres and put it as the bottom of a fraction with one on top" ... this will be in seconds

so using a 50mm lens , 1/50th of a second is a good rule as a maximum shutter setting.

using 100mm lens, 1/100th second is a good maximum exposure rule.

As you increase the focal length, the magnification increases and therefore any shaky or wobbly hand movement is magnified (therefore the speed needs to be shortened to reduce the effect of hand motion).

Using a tripod, a monopod (one leg with the camera on top) or even using a tree to add support will allow longer exposures to be used (of course the tree method being only good for a slight increase in exposure time).

As for metering, I would view my scene through the camera, and point at various areas in my desired scene that are brighter and darker. You will see the light metre needle (whatever your camera uses) move up or down depending on the brightness of the area right in the centre of your view finder. This way you can see where the needle is at the brightest spot and also at the darker areas of the photo scene and set the lens's f-ratio (ring on the lens) to an average location of the needle (so in this case the loop won't neccessarily match exactly the needle position when you line up your desired scene.

So one must basically balance the exposure and desired lens aperture (f-ratio on lens)

Hope this rambling made some sense :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
myownpath and dk_art ... you two rock.

MyOwnPath - - I had actually *wanted* a 1000, but hubby got this one for me for X-mas and I didn't complain.

Anyway, everything you said "clicks" with me.

*blushes* I actually have a small manual that came with the camera, but I swear I don't understand it at all. I also bought a book to help me and it has helped me some, but at the same time has left me more confused. What I can't understand, still (sorry dk ... I just don't) ... is the ISO. I mean, I understand that it has to be set to correspond with my film speed, but I'm not sure what that's is. The books says to it at 0 and add or subtract 1 as the film speed doubles. Does this mean that if the film speed is 100 I set it at 0? Then if I use 200 speed, I set it at ??? -1 or +1? See what I mean? THIS is what confuses me.

All of that being said ... I ended up taking my Pentax EZQ. We *almost* didn't get the lesson because weather decided to get bad RIGHT during that time of day ... of course, the sun was out before AND after :p He enjoyed it and seems pretty happy with the whole deal. I'll get the pics posted as soon as I get them developed.
 

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umm for iso i think it's basically: check your light meter (is there a meter in the viewfinder itself that goes up and down?) you want the meter to level off somewhere in the middle for best exposure. watch the meter and play with the aperture (f-stop) a bit. watch the meter go up and down as you adjust it, get a feel for it.

if it's really bright out and the meter is way at the top no matter what f-stop you use, adjust the iso, just try a couple settings and adjust the f-stop again until you get a setting that balances out ok on the meter. likewise if the lighting is dim and the meter is way at the bottom. but don't set it lower than 60 (if i remember correctly) because you'll get camera shake (blurriness) unless you use a tripod and your subject is very still.

there should also be a dial to set the film speed you're using, which will change the meter readings.

on my camera, there's a circular dial on the top with the iso settings. there's a little square on the top of the dial showing the film speed, if you lift the dial up you can turn and change the film speed, when you don't lift it up and turn it, you're changing the iso.

i'm sure you know where the aperture/f-stop is, but just in case, it's the part on the lens you can turn that isn't the focus.

film speeds: for indoors i use between 100 and 200, for outdoors or bright lighting i use 400, but if you're not sure if you're going to be more indoors or more outdoors, i'd just use 200 and then you can adjust if it's bright, or pick a shaded area and make sure the sun is to your back. it's easier to cope with bright lighting than dark i find, unless you want specific landscape shots

as far as flashes go, mine has a little chart on the back of it saying what settings to use with the flash, but i pretty much just estimate.

if you want, tomorrow i can go copy down the chart here for you. i can't dig for my camera right now due to sleeping bf. but basically it says if your meter shows to use this setting, with the flash, use this instead. so you have to figure out the best setting if you had no flash, and then compare and change it according to the chart. it's pretty simple
 

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derr i think i got that backwards with the film speed. 100-200 for outdoors/bright lighting, 400 for indoors or dim lighting. you can tell i've been neglecting my camera lately
 
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