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I don't eat any meat anymore except fish on the rarest occasions. Those occasions being: whenever I visit my mom. She lives in the small town I grew up in and likes to take me out to eat when I visit. Small town = lack of variety in restaurants. I always end up folding and ordering the fish. Tips for said occasion? I really need to build my food will power.

~Sarah
 

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If your willpower is low, then you need to focus on that. When you go out to the restaurant, check the menu and scan it well for anything that isn't animal. Even if you don't really like it, order that instead, regardless of what your stomach is telling you.

Try to think about what those fish went through to get to that place. Maybe they were fished in the ocean - that means either being snatched up brutally from your home by a net and being dragged across the seafloor with a bunch of others so that you can be pulled up to the surface to die a slow, painful death of asphyxiation, or being tricked into eating fake prey and getting a metal hook stabbed into your face so you can then be pulled up to the surface to die a slow, painful death of asphyxiation or a quick, brutal death at the knife of a fisherman who doesn't even care that you exist except for the fact that you make him money. Maybe they were grown in a disgusting factory farm, in which case you need only think of the other animals you choose not to eat, and their treatment.

Of course, you might also be interested in being a vegetarian for health reasons, in which case I can't really help you. Just remember that fish are greasy and fatty even though everyone claims them to be healthy. They may have nutrients but they're really no better than beef or chicken.
 

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Give peas a chance
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Tell the waiter or waitress you are a vegetarian and don't see anything on the menu you can eat, and ask if there is something they would be able to make for you.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by lovelyveggiechik View Post

yeah, I'm only interested for health reasons. I'm not much of an activist.
Not sure how to help you then, sorry. Just try to overpower your urge for fish with the idea of not eating it, I guess.
 

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Herbivorous Urchin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lovelyveggiechik View Post

yeah, I'm only interested for health reasons. I'm not much of an activist.
Hrmph, then how about all the mercury and toxin's you are likely consumer?

Also, having compassion for those who are being slaughter, tortured, and decimated, does not always equate being an activist, however, you should always being "active" in the choices you make.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by vegkid View Post

Of course, you might also be interested in being a vegetarian for health reasons, in which case I can't really help you. Just remember that fish are greasy and fatty even though everyone claims them to be healthy. They may have nutrients but they're really no better than beef or chicken.
no.
 

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Not such a Beginner ;)
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Is it that you don't want to make an issue of your vegetarianism in front of your mom in the restaurant? Family can be the most difficult! I often don't like having discussions with the waiter with omnis listening in. If possible, I look up the menu online beforehand and pick out things. Sometimes it is appetizers or baked potato with something vegan on it (I will eat pretty much anything on a potato!) or the ole pasta with red sauce and salad. Stirfry and rice.

I guess to stay vegetarian strictly for health reasons is a thing and of course good, but wouldn't it be a nice feeling to not order the fish and picture one more pretty fish swimming around free?
 

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Originally Posted by vegkid View Post

Yes. Look it up.
Typical Meat Nutritional Content
from 110 grams (4 oz or .25 lb)

fish
110-140 calories
20-25 g protein
0 g carbs
1-5 g fats
 

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I do believe a vegan diet can be more easily healthy than one with animal products, but that doesn't make all animal products unhealthy.
I'm fine with people mostly eating a veg diet for health reasons, but that can only come from very limited intake. You can't say you want organic, healthy animal flesh from farmed animals. You also can't expect much to be raised.
People who want to eat meats should never get them from stores or restaurants, but live where hunting is neccessary, IMO.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by lovelyveggiechik View Post

I don't eat any meat anymore except fish on the rarest occasions. Those occasions being: whenever I visit my mom. She lives in the small town I grew up in and likes to take me out to eat when I visit. Small town = lack of variety in restaurants. I always end up folding and ordering the fish. Tips for said occasion? I really need to build my food will power.

~Sarah
I think you've made some lovely, positive changes in your life. You're awesome.

Consider ordering one of these free eating guides to help give you ideas for meat free recipes while at home.

As for your question, just keep the animals in mind. Consider the impact fishing has. Read the book Eating Animals by Jonathan Foer. It has an entire chapter about the fishing industry. Stay positive and stay strong.
 

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  • Snack before you go and just order something light, like a salad, that will take as long to eat as your dining partner's meal.
  • Order a bunch of side dishes like fries, vegetables, etc. and ask them for some sauce on the side for flavor. With some bread it's quite satisfying.
  • Ask them to make something from the menu without the meat--club sandwich with cheese and veggies for example.
  • Ask if they'll cook you an egg breakfast.
  • Say, "I'm a vegetarian. I was wondering if you could make any suggestions?" Done in a very polite way, you often will find they have a vegetarian dish that's not listed on the menu, and the bonus of raising the awareness level of the restauranteur re what his/her customers want. I've had some memorable off-menu meals by doing this. You will have to contend with questions about whether you eat fish, just say no, no meat-based anything including broth, Worchestershire, etc.
  • More suggestions available in these books.
 
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