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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
alright I just got a plot of land to make an organic vegetable garden through the city this year...I've never grown a thing b4, much less organically.<br><br>
I didn't think about this intially, but where do I get seeds? I'm assuming the seeds at all the plant shops and home improvement shops were from pesticide plants, and who knows what else they did to them...or am I going overboard and once I plant it on my own and it starts growing it's considered organic?<br><br>
lol I feel stupid but thanks
 

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I buy my seeds from a gardening centre. And then grow them organically at home. I don't have a problem with that. I guess it depends on your own preferences though, you probably can get organic seeds somewhere.<br><br>
So if this is your first year of growing I would suggest picking a few easy and rewarding vegetables to grow and then adding more each year as you gain experience.<br>
- tomatoes are really rewarding, but need lots of sun and water<br>
- herbs are nice and easy generally, and you can grow them at home no matter how small your house/apartment/section.<br>
- Lettuce<br>
- caggabe/brocoli/cauliflower have always done welli n my garden with little effort<br>
- carrots are good too<br>
- beans and peas are generally quite easy if you have something for them to grow up<br><br>
There are lots of experienced gardeners on here and the internet is a wealth of info. Asking your garden centre for advice on when to plant in your area is always very helpful too. they should be able to help you with soil prep if your plot needs it!
 

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I'd ask them if you are expected to plant everything from organic seeds. You may not need to go that far. They may just want you to refrain from using synthetic fertilizers, pesticides, herbicides, etc. Since we are already into May, it would help you make up time if you could put some plants into the ground right now, rather than having to start everything from seed. Then you could be eating tomatoes by the end of June, rather than the end of July.<br><br>
See if you can get some advice from the other gardeners. They may be able to give you ideas about what does well and if there are shared problems to watch out for.<br><br>
If you do go from seed, look at what a local garden center has to offer. Don't buy seeds at Walmart or a home improvement store like Home Depot.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Mojo</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2885419"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
If you do go from seed, look at what a local garden center has to offer. Don't buy seeds at Walmart or a home improvement store like Home Depot.</div>
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Why not? I'm just curious because I was thinking of starting a small garden as well and I was not blessed with what they call a "green thumb."
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>NRAVegetarian</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2885423"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Why not? I'm just curious because I was thinking of starting a small garden as well and I was not blessed with what they call a "green thumb."</div>
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Garden centers specialize in growing plants and will have a much more diverse selection. Plus they will have a more knowledgeable staff to answer questions.<br><br>
For example I was in Home Depot last saturday to get lumber so I could build up my beds. I got that then headed over to the garden area to see if they had some of the seeds I needed, to try to save a trip to the garden center. First thing I look for is beans. NO bean seeds whatsoever. Not even a place that shows where the bean seeds would have been sold in case they were sold out. They just didn't carry beans. I went to Armstrong Garden Center, plenty of bean seeds. Lima, soybean, pole, bush, green bean, etc....<br><br>
At Home Depot I asked them if they had borage, which is a flower that bees love. The guy watering the plants didn't know what it was, so I spelled it out, b-o-r-a-g-e. Still didn't know, so we went to his supervisor. The supervisor of the garden department said he never heard of that. At Armstrong I couldn't find them either, so a staff person showed me where it was. They had 2 different types to choose from, blue or white flowers. And then we went to the seed section and they had it in seed as well. And then she gave me advice on placement in the garden so it would thrive and also help the bees pollinate tomatoes.
 

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yes, you are over killing it. remember, when you walk around you are breathing in microscopic bits of tire in the air (where do you THINK tires go when they wear away on the road). the point is you can't escape everything. by the time you plant a seed and it grows, you've already taken in more toxins by the time you've had your morning coffee than you would because you planted a nonorganic seed.<br><br>
what you want to do is experiment so you can learn and plan and improve. if i were you, i'd crash the 10 cent seed bins when they mark them down. get as many different seeds as you can so you can experiment. you've got a lot to learn and it's a long haul to go from tilling and planting to a successful harvest. i've had incredible successes from nearly free plants and utter failure from plants i paid an arm and a leg for. so do and learn and good luck with it all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
yea i'm not really that anal about the organic seed thing, but it is by name a community organic garden so I didn't wanna be pissing anyone off.<br><br>
so up here in Minnesota people keep telling me to buy plants and transplant them, that really seems like cheating though. can tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, etc grow well from seed planting outside or do I need to plant them inside for a month or so to get em started? I don't have any plant lamps etc for indoor growing. Is there anything that needs to be started inside rather than seeding outdoors?
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>NRAVegetarian</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2885423"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Why not? I'm just curious because I was thinking of starting a small garden as well and I was not blessed with what they call a "green thumb."</div>
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that's the spirit! and there is no one who is blessed with a green thumb. i sometimes have 10 thumbs that all point in different directions, and not one of them is green. it's just a process of learning. you do to learn and you learn by doing.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Mojo</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2885565"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Garden centers specialize in growing plants and will have a much more diverse selection. Plus they will have a more knowledgeable staff to answer questions.<br><br>
For example I was in Home Depot last saturday to get lumber so I could build up my beds. I got that then headed over to the garden area to see if they had some of the seeds I needed, to try to save a trip to the garden center. First thing I look for is beans. NO bean seeds whatsoever. Not even a place that shows where the bean seeds would have been sold in case they were sold out. They just didn't carry beans. I went to Armstrong Garden Center, plenty of bean seeds. Lima, soybean, pole, bush, green bean, etc....<br><br>
At Home Depot I asked them if they had borage, which is a flower that bees love. The guy watering the plants didn't know what it was, so I spelled it out, b-o-r-a-g-e. Still didn't know, so we went to his supervisor. The supervisor of the garden department said he never heard of that. At Armstrong I couldn't find them either, so a staff person showed me where it was. They had 2 different types to choose from, blue or white flowers. And then we went to the seed section and they had it in seed as well. And then she gave me advice on placement in the garden so it would thrive and also help the bees pollinate tomatoes.</div>
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Thank you very much! And even <i>I</i> have heard of borage..... <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/laugh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":lol:">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>papayamon</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2886071"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
you do to learn and you learn by doing.</div>
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Damn straight! :)
 

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Give peas a chance
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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>yumy</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2886070"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
so up here in Minnesota people keep telling me to buy plants and transplant them, that really seems like cheating though.</div>
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Cheating? Not to me. I look at it this way. If I go to the farmers market to buy organic tomatoes, I will pay $3 a pound. At the grocery store they are $4-$5 a pound. Each plant I put in my garden will yield about $100 worth of organic tomatoes. Whether a plant was grown from 5 cents worth of seeds or was a $3 transplant doesn't matter to me. My net profit will be either $99.95 dollars worth of tomatoes, or $97 dollars worth of tomatoes. I just want a great return on my investment, and I get that, whether the plants are from seed or transplant.<br><br>
There are very practical reasons for doing transplants instead of seeds. If you go from seeds, you put them in the ground then wait for them to germinate. That might be 10-20 days, depending on your avg temp and the type of plant. Then the first week after the plant pops above ground it is extremely vulnerable to birds, cutworms, slugs, etc. They love tender new plants, and at that stage they can destroy the plant quickly. Once the plants get bigger, it takes longer for them to completely destroy it and easier for you to intercept them. If you use transplants, you bypass that stage where a lot of failures can occur.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
ty mojo <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D">
 

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My attempts at an organic veggie garden have failed. Everything grew great in the soil, but most of it got eaten by bugs, slugs and all kinds of weird insects before we got a chance to eat it.
 

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^ the key to succesful gardening is to actually go out to your backyard in <i>daylight</i> hours to attend to the plants.
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":p"> I did! Once or twice. LOL. I've cut everything back and sprayed it with the dust stuff as you suggested. With a bit of luck it'll come good. <img alt="" src="http://fc04.deviantart.net/images2/i/2004/03/2/c/Fingers_Crossed_emoticon.gif" style="border:0px solid;">
 

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There are specialty seed developers who you can order seeds from. Some of them are non commercial seed savers, others are very small businesses. Usually they have varieties that are much better than the big companies. There are a few good cultivars available from regional suppliers. In the northeast, for example, there is Harris seeds, Johnny's. But the hobbyists are better. Some are retired geneticists, from the big seed houses. Check with your local cooperative extension for hints on which cultivars are known to grow best in your climate and soil.<br><br>
I suggest that for a few favorite plants, learn how to save their seeds and how to chose fathers and breed your own varieites. How to breed your own vegetable varieites by Carol Something.
 

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What are the best additives for soil? I'm trying to start a compost but I need to add to the soil now before the season gets too late.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Randa</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2895978"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
What are the best additives for soil? I'm trying to start a compost but I need to add to the soil now before the season gets too late.</div>
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It depends upon the particular soil. In the US, can have Cooperative Extension test a sample of your soil and make recommendations for soil amendment. You can even specify you want to use organic soil amendments or "any" soil amendment, and they'll recomend organic or any. The test is, if I recall correctly, less than $20. Other countries probably have their own version of a Cooperative Extension agricultural service. University run, gov funded.
 

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Cool thank you. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 
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