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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
I have quit eating meat and poultry since last May. I stopped eating fish couple months ago. Cant drink milk either. Just recently I realised I can't eat egg or heavy white cheese (heavy meaning fatty) anymore. Instead all I can still eat as dairy is yoghurt and soft uncured cheese (similar to cottage cheese). This is very normal for most vegetarians. But here is my question:
I work out 3 to 4 times a week during which I do gym and cardio. When working out with muscles you need extra protein. What do you suggest that I should do. My question might sound very simple but since I am very new to all these I would really appreciate some suggestions.
Thank you very much...
 

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Lentils, quinoa, beans, split peas, edamame, tofu...
 

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Haha. I totally misunderstood the title of this post, and thought that a vegetarian child had some questions for us!

Good vegetarian protein sources include soy (in the form of tofu, tempeh, soy milk, edamame, etc), seitan, nuts and nut butters, all sorts of legumes (black beans, lentils, kidney beans, chickpeas, etc).
 

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Oatmeal with peanut butter is good, and easy. Sweet potatoes and black beans are a thing (my son is a vegan martial artist). He also likes green smoothies with frozen berries, fresh banana, OJ, and sometimes a shot of protein powder (pea or hemp). He likes dates and nuts, rice and beans, bean chilis, huge stirfries, lots of fresh fruit and veggies.
 

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Beans! Beans are the greatest.

Also, whole grains and nuts (including nut butters and peanut butter) are great sources of protein.

There are lots of vegan protein powders that you can use if you like to make post-workout smoothies.

Some resources that focus on vegan athleticism and a more health-based perspective:

http://www.richroll.com/ (Plant-based ultra-marathoner--has a great podcast)
http://www.veganbodybuilding.com/
http://www.veganhealthandfitnessmag.com/
http://engine2diet.com/

Even though it doesn't sound like you're intending to go vegan yet, these resources should help you see how easy it is to fuel your workouts without animal products. Rich Roll, the ultra-runner, even claims that his vegan diet helps him recover faster than he could before.
 

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:hi: :hi: :hi: :hi: :hi: :hi: :hi: :hi: :hi: :hi: :hi: :hi:

W e l c o m e

:hi: :hi: :hi: :hi: :hi: :hi: :hi: :hi: :hi: :hi: :hi: :hi:
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Welcome to VeggieBoards!

I have been working out five to six days per week, cycling to work, weight lifting, hiking, canoeing, snowshoeing, rowing, you name it for years. I am a former dancer and I love to be active. As long as I eat enough and eat fairly healthy and maintain a normal weight, I have not had a problem as a vegan building muscle and staying fit.

My protein sources aren't going to be much different than what everyone else mentioned. I rely heavily on a variety of beans...black, white, kidney, lentils, peas, limas, chickpeas, pintos, etc. I use them to make my own veggie patties, soups, dips, stir fries, etc.

I eat walnuts, almonds, chia seeds, ground flaxseeds, pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds etc. I use those to make my own homemade mayonnaise, dips, in baked goods, my own plant milk on occasion, in stir fries or salads etc.

Chickpea flour (also known as besan flour) I use often for making omelets or flatbread or gluten free/soy free quiches. It is great for a savory breakfast item.

Broccoli, leafy greens, sweet potatoes all are good sources of protein. I can get a load of protein simmering some sweet potato, kale, and black beans in a nonstick skillet with vegetable broth or water and spices for dinner for instance. Throw in some brown rice and it ups the anty.

Grains like buckwheat groats, oats/oat groats, brown or wild rice, quinoa, millet, barley, bulgur wheat are all great sources of protein too. Even quality homemade whole wheat bread or organic vegan commercial whole wheat bread can provide 4 grams per slice. If you have a sandwich and add some hummus or another bean dip in it that is 12 to 16 grams of protein right there. Have a mixed green salad on the side with a sprinkle of seeds and it adds even more protein.

Soy milk has a good bit of protein, about the same amount as a glass of dairy milk. Have it with some homemade granola and there is a lot of protein there.

Tempeh, tofu, vital wheat gluten (to make seitan) are HUGE sources of protein. Tofu is extremely versatile and can be used to make high protein puddings, homemade mayo, "cheese" sauces, as a meat substitute in stir fries, scrambled "eggs" etc. Tempeh is great to add to tacos, stir fries, sliced in sandwiches, tempeh "bacon" strips, etc. Because it is fermented it is very easily digested and it's nutrients are highly bioavailable. I use vital wheat gluten on occasion to make "chicken" nuggets. Making seitan with vital wheat gluten is very easy. I have also used vital wheat gluten to add to homemade breads to boost protein and help them rise more. Vital wheat gluten is extremly high protein as gluten itself is a protein.

And if you really still feel you need to boost your protein intake more, there are a variety of vegan protein powders out there, and many of them are soy free and gluten free if those are concerns. I sometimes use pure pea protein powder because there are no additives and no sugar added. There are rice protein powders, pea based, sprouted grain based, soy based, hemp based, and some with a mix of plant proteins.

Surprisingly, nutritional yeast flakes provide a good bit of protein. Two tablespoons have 8 grams of protein. I use nutritional yeast to make "cheese" sauce (I blend it with plant milk, sweet potato, with or without tofu, and spices like turmeric and garlic powder for a very creamy sauce to go over baked potatoes and broccoli or for macaroni and "cheese").
 
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