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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I'm a proud vegetarian and a bashful gout sufferer with a dilemma. I've been reading about how important Omega 3 is but that it's the compounds DHA and LPA that are the really important ones, not the ALA that is easily found in flax seed oil.<br>
Kelp and algae are good sources of these compounds but I believe they increase blood uric acid levels - bad for gout.<br>
Does anyone have any suggestions? Obviously fish oil is out of the question!
 

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Take a look at this poduct, I've been seeing it lately in pharmacies.<br><a href="http://myvega.com/products/antioxidant-efa-oil-blend/features-benefits" target="_blank">http://myvega.com/products/antioxida...tures-benefits</a>
 

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If you have gout you need to stop eating foods that produce uric acid. Adding a fat supplement to a bad gout producing diet isn't going to fix anything.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks, perhaps I wasn't clear about what I'm asking about - I do avoid foods high in purine, which produce uric acid in the body, but I still want the benefits of omega 3; I'm not looking to omega 3 to cure my gout, even though ALA does have anti-inflammatory properties.<br>
Unfortunately some of the better sources of DHA and EPA are contained in foods that raise blood uric acid levels, leading to gout. I was wondering whether anyone knew of an alternative non-animal source (besides kelp and algae) of these compounds. Flax seed contains ALA, which the body can convert at variously efficient rates (depending on what you read) into DHA and EPA but it may not be enough.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Dewski</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2839349"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Arbonne has a vegan Omega 3 supplement. If you would like, I could send you the ingredients list.</div>
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Thanks, Dewski, I'd like to check that out
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>trevorsacks</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2839300"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Thanks, perhaps I wasn't clear about what I'm asking about - I do avoid foods high in purine, which produce uric acid in the body, but I still want the benefits of omega 3; I'm not looking to omega 3 to cure my gout, even though ALA does have anti-inflammatory properties.<br>
Unfortunately some of the better sources of DHA and EPA are contained in foods that raise blood uric acid levels, leading to gout. I was wondering whether anyone knew of an alternative non-animal source (besides kelp and algae) of these compounds. Flax seed contains ALA, which the body can convert at variously efficient rates (depending on what you read) into DHA and EPA but it may not be enough.</div>
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Ok, sorry for the misunderstanding.<br><br>
Unless you know, from a doctor's diagnosis, that you aren't able to convert ALA into DHA and EPA, reducing your intake of Omega 6 fatty acids will enable your body to do the conversion itself. That is the reason why most people are inefficient at converting ALA to DHA and EPA. It's not that they don't get enough Omega 3 fatty acids, it's that they consume way too many Omega 6 fatty acids.<br><br>
As far as supplements go, I am not aware of anything supplying DHA and EPA besides algae and fish oil.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>SomebodyElse</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2839536"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Ok, sorry for the misunderstanding.<br><br>
Unless you know, from a doctor's diagnosis, that you aren't able to convert ALA into DHA and EPA, reducing your intake of Omega 6 fatty acids will enable your body to do the conversion itself. That is the reason why most people are inefficient at converting ALA to DHA and EPA. It's not that they don't get enough Omega 3 fatty acids, it's that they consume way too many Omega 6 fatty acids.<br><br>
As far as supplements go, I am not aware of anything supplying DHA and EPA besides algae and fish oil.</div>
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Thanks for the info. I'll look into the omega 6 ratio thing - very interesting.
 

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Any info on the algae increasing uric acid? I'm curious because I take spirulina daily and haven't heard this.
 
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