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I buy this non-carbonated fruit-flavored water and two things about the labeling really bother me.<br><br><br><br>
First, it says "naturally flavored" but has artificial sweetener. That doesn't seem right. Second, even though it's naturally flavored it contains no juice. Eh? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/inquisitive.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":stinkeye:">
 

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Naturally-flavored in re to fruit-flavored beverages means not artificially flavored. One of the handful of approved aritifical flavors, is not being used. Practically anything else can be used. Typically, cherry water will have something like cherry seed extract, or cherry skin extract, lemon wter will have lemon oil (made from lemon peels). But cherry water could also have pear puree or grape-skin extract or whatever -- as long as it isn't one of the coal tar derivatives. Conceivably it could be natural beef flavor -- but it wouldn't make sense to use beef flavor to give somethng a fruit flavor. Of course "natural flavor" in french fried potatos doesn't nec mean natural potato flavor. It could be natural beef extract from real beef eyeballs.<br><br><br><br>
Naturally sweetened has nothing to do with naturally flavored.<br><br><br><br>
If it contains actual juice it always says how much, by percent, somewhere.
 

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Today I saw a bottled product that one uses to make sauces, like Barbecue sauce.<br><br><br><br>
On the bottle was a big warning (white letters on red (danger colour) background). It said to not consume the bottle contents undiluted (something about acid), and not to get it on your skin or your clothes.<br><br><br><br>
I don't think I'll ever try making my own sauce with that stuff.<br><br><br><br><br><br><i>Edited: a minor correction.</i>
 

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There are rules for the minimum ingredients for a product.<br><br>
Flavouring doesnt say much.<br><br>
In Europe there are rules on how much real juice there has to be in fruit juice and how it may be named.<br><br><br><br>
I find it very interesting to see how things are made and am often surprised.<br><br>
IE: did you know that fruit-juice is sometimes clarified with animal bases ingredients?
 

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1vegan,<br><br>
Eew! How would I know which was which? Is there any mandatory reporting of that animal based clarifying?
 

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StrangeI dont get a notification from some threads.<br><br><br><br>
I found out when I started to check on E-numbers.<br><br><br><br>
E-numbers stands for additives that are used in the making off food.<br><br>
If a additive is approved by the European community it get a E-code.<br><br><br><br>
So I found in a guide that a certain E-number is animal based and is used for clarifying fruit juice<br><br>
Forgot the number, will look it up again.<br><br><br><br>
I dont know how its labelled in the us, but you have EATFUS<br><br>
(everything added to food in the us)
 

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An animal-origin clarifier, is <i>issenglass,</i> made from fish. It is more commonly used in European wines, than in US wines, and does not have to be listed on the wine label (wines are exempt from certain listing laws, in the US, and so are imported foods).<br><br><br><br>
However it is only used in small amounts. There are other clarifying agents; I know very little about them tho. I prefer my juice cloudy anyway. Don't see why wine can't be cloudy too. Clouds improve flavor -- as anyone who has eaten the famous cloudy RedCheek apple juice, and compared it Mott's, can attest. Tho Red Cheek used to taste better 40 years ago than it did 15 years ago.
 
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