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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys. Since I became vegan I have really been enjoying oatmeal. I have it most mornings with this cold weather. I was wondering what the differences were between oatmeals.<br><br>
I usually make this one when I have time:<br><img alt="" src="http://www.venelogia.com/uploads/audrey/avena_2.jpeg" style="border:0px solid;"><br>
I suppose these are normal oats? I have to cook them about 10minutes.<br><br>
When I am in a rush I quite like the Instant Quaker Oats which I cook in a pan tho, not in the microwave. Those seem to be a similar type of oat.<br><br>
But today I tried something I found at WHole Foods called - Irish Steel Cut Oats. These had a very distinct taste, very different from the others. They tasted very 'whole'. I quite enjoyed them.<br><br>
What I was wondering was if 'all oats are created equal'? Or are maybe the 1st ones more processed than the last ones? From what I understand the steal cut include the outer 'shell' and the others don't?<br>
Are the instant ones like 'junk food'?<br><br>
Sorry for the stupid questions. But NOBODY here eats oatmeal so I am a little confused lol.
 

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The oats in the picture are pre-cooked, rolled oats as one would call them.<br><br>
Less nutritional value, but extremely convenient.
 

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Oats start out as little grains, like rice or barley.<br>
The steel cut kind are basically chopped up from that original state, in my experience eating them dry or undercooked isnt as fun lol, they might have a glycemic index just a tad lower because theyre slightly slower to digest unless overcooked (a small difference in glycemic index is probably meaningless unless your diabetic, may be not even then).<br>
The ones pictured ^ are rolled oats, the grains go through a machine that squishes them between rolling pins. Faster to cook and easy to eat dry (I'm eating some right now :p). The only drawback I can think of is there tends to be larger pieces of chaff ('shells') left in when theyre rolled... but I do buy a absolutely dirt cheap brand so chaff may not be a problem in your brand.<br>
The commercial instant types are a slightly more processed and significantly higher priced version of rolled oats, usually. They cook a bit faster and they come in designer flavors.<br>
Nutritionally theres little difference between any plain oats types- all are good sources of protein, fiber, and vitamin B1
 

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This is taken directly from the blog VeganYumYum:<br><br>
"Steel-cut oats are the less processed version of the oats we’re more familiar with, rolled oats. At least, rolled oats are the oats <i>I’m</i> most familiar with. While rolled oats are just as much a whole grain as steel-cut, they have been steamed, flattened, steamed again and then toasted dry. A steel-cut oat is simply cut into three or four pieces and then dried. Some people say the rolled oat, being more processed, has less nutrition and less flavor than the steel-cut variety, but I haven’t found any conclusive proof of that (in three minutes of googling).<br><br>
There is a clear difference between the two; steel-cut oats take much, much longer to cook than rolled oats. It can take steel cut oats up to 40 minutes to cook, compared to rolled oats which finish up in a mere 5 minutes. Steel-cut retain their texture better after cooking, resulting in a chewier breakfast than standard rolled oats provide. Some people who are really into their oats insist that the steel-cut version has a nuttier, fuller flavor. You’ll find many people willing to invest the time in steel-cut oats just for their toothsome texture and full flavor.<br><br>
Keep in mind oats come in more than these two versions. You can find whole oat groats (Wow. Oat groat? That’s really the term for it?), which are the least processed and take the longest to cook. The next step down from the whole oat groat is steel-cut, then rolled oats, quick-cooking oats, and instant oats. Generally, avoiding both ends of the spectrum is the best advice. Whole oat groats take forever to cook (I think pre-soaking is even recommended) and instant oats are so mushy and formless, they’re not worthwhile when you can make quick cooking and even rolled oats in under 5 minutes.<br><br>
While I’m geeking out about oats, I should mention that quick cooking oats are generally preferred for making oatmeal cookies. I read that rolled oats can be used, but the dough should be refrigerated for 20 minutes to let the oats soften up by absorbing some moisture before baking. I’ve definitely used rolled oats in cookies without doing the refrigeration trick, so feel free to ignore this paragraph entirely if you’ve got a cookie recipe that works for you."<br><br>
Hope this helps! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you so much!<br>
I have to say I really enjoyed the steel cut oats - they had such a different taste than the 'usual oatmeal'. I thought that they might have a bit more fiber because they are 'chewier'. Mine were actually cooked in 5 minutes - I think they were the 'quick oats' variety.<br><br>
So the steaming of the rolled oats isn't an issue nutritionally? That's good.
 

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steel cuts are the most nutritious of them all.
 

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Here's what LiveStrong says:<br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Steel-cut oats have a greater volume than rolled oats, so 1/4 dry cup of each variety yields different nutritional facts when the oats are cooked. However, when measured by weight, the two types have the same nutritional values.<br><br>
link: <a href="http://www.livestrong.com/article/455623-steel-cut-oats-vs-100-percent-whole-grain-rolled-oats/#ixzz1iuhL4wXX" target="_blank">http://www.livestrong.com/article/45...#ixzz1iuhL4wXX</a></div>
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And Quaker Oats says:<br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">The different size and shape of the oats only affects the cooking time and texture.<br><br>
link: <a href="http://www.quakeroats.com/products/product-frequently-asked-questions.aspx" target="_blank">http://www.quakeroats.com/products/p...questions.aspx</a></div>
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By the way, January is national oatmeal month!
 

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hmm....I've read on food blogs about steel being better for you. any oatmeal other than packaged instant is good for you though.
 

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I make my steel-cut oats in my rice/veggie steamer, which is an older model of this one, that I picked up for $3 at a thrift store:<br><br><a href="http://www.blackanddeckerappliances.com/p-80-handy-steamer.aspx" target="_blank">http://www.blackanddeckerappliances....y-steamer.aspx</a><br><br>
It's far easier than stovetop methods where you have to worry about sticking and burning, and the texture of steel-cut oats is much better than rolled, in my opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Oh that is a very smart way of cooking them.<br><br>
Oatmeal month lol.<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">any oatmeal other than packaged instant is good for you though.</div>
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so those instant quaker ones are not really very good for you?
 

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Instant oats are very good for you, eat away! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> I usually eat the rolled, but sometimes do steelcut in the slow cooker. All delicious and nutritious! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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Nutritionally, it goes like this: Instant < Rolled < Steel cut. The instant oatmeal that comes in little packets, sometimes flavored, can be really high in sugar and have less of the good stuff. Steel cut oats are most nutritional, as they have most of the original grain, but they take longer to cook. I wouldn't say any of them are <i>bad</i> for you though.
 

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The only issue I've found with the individually-packaged Quaker Instant Oatmeal is that those tend to have a LOT of sugar already, so if you tend to add white or brown sugar to your oatmeal after you cook it, I think you'd be getting a lot more sugar than just buying the quick-cooking oats, rolled oats, or steel-cut oats. I think it's still a good choice for breakfast especially if you're in a hurry, but I usually buy the quick-cooking oats just because they aren't pre-sweetened and still only take 5 minutes or so <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>dormouse</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3076596"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Nutritionally, it goes like this: Instant < Rolled < Steel cut. The instant oatmeal that comes in little packets, sometimes flavored, can be really high in sugar and have less of the good stuff. Steel cut oats are most nutritional, as they have most of the original grain, but they take longer to cook. I wouldn't say any of them are <i>bad</i> for you though.</div>
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>not reading the previous page.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>SwissMiss</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3076498"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Oh that is a very smart way of cooking them.<br><br>
Oatmeal month lol.<br><br><br>
so those instant quaker ones are not really very good for you?</div>
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the unflavored unsweetened are fine, it's just all of the added sugar and chemicals like stated above, that are bad for you. cook up your own, and add your fruit or sweeteners, that you can control
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Envy</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3076606"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
>not reading the previous page.</div>
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I did read the previous page, but I didn't think any of the posts summarized it in the way I did. In fact, I chose to write the post in the way I did because to someone confused about the nutritional values of oatmeal, some of the posts in this thread might seem to provide contradictory information (even though they don't).<br><br>
There's really no reason to be rude in a thread about oatmeal, of all things. Besides, implying that a member's post is unneeded or extraneous gets pretty close to breaking our rule about "discouraging other members from posting."
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>dormouse</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3076630"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I did read the previous page, but I didn't think any of the posts summarized it in the way I did. In fact, I chose to write the post in the way I did because to someone confused about the nutritional values of oatmeal, some of the posts in this thread might seem to provide contradictory information (even though they don't).</div>
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Contradictory how?<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>dormouse</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3076630"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
There's really no reason to be rude in a thread about oatmeal, of all things. Besides, implying that a member's post is unneeded or extraneous gets pretty close to breaking our rule about "discouraging other members from posting."</div>
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You may think of it how you like, a rule unbroken is a rule unbroken.
 
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