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Hi Everyone,


I just finished putting together an article on the nuts and seeds I have in my pantry. The article describes what they are, with pictures, and their nutritional value and benefits. I think this is a must read for anyone who is transitioning into a vegetarian or vegan diet.

Here is the link: http://www.glutenfreeveganpantry.com/gluten-free-vegan-pantry-staples-nuts-and-seeds/

Thanks for reading and please let me know what you have in your pantry, I'd love to hear it :)
 

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Currently we have sunflower seeds, walnuts, hemp hearts, almonds, and cashews at home.
 

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Vegan since 1991
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The article and photos are nicely put together.


Could you double-check the article's statements about almonds being an excellent source of potassium? Although one cup of almonds contains 29% RDI of potassium, it also contains 824 calories!: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/nut-and-seed-products/3087/2 . A better source of potassium might be potatoes - a large baked potato contains 46% RDI of potassium, and only 278 calories: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2770/2 .
 

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I regularly eat/use pumpkin seeds, flaxseeds, chia seeds, sunflower seeds, almonds, walnuts, and brazil nuts (great source of selenium). On occasion I use sesame seeds. Cashews are a rare treat (hard on my stomach) as are pistachios. I only consume a few tablespoons to a 1/4 cup per day of nuts/seeds though, sometimes a little less or more. Right now I have chia, flaxseed, sunflower seeds, and brazil nuts in my pantry.

There are many ways to incorporate nuts/seeds in the diet besides just consuming them directly too. I use almonds to make homemade vegan mayonnaise or grind them into a flour for baking/cooking. I also use either almonds or sunflower seeds ground up with garlic powder and nutritional yeast or other spices for vegan "parmesan" to go over pasta or other dishes. Chia seeds can be used for baking or to make puddings. I have also used just flaxseeds, dates, and water to make a frothy creamy homemade flaxseed milk in my high speed blender. I add calcium powder and vitamin D drops to my batch of flaxseed milk also. Great way to get omega 3s in daily. Nuts/seeds are a great base to make thick sauces like vegan alfredo or to make homemade vegan cream cheese or sliced cheese. I have also made homemade vegan almond sliced cheese blocks (with the help of agar flakes).

Not everyone can consume them though. My mother has diverticulitis/losis and was in the hospital for a week a year or so ago as it was so bad. She can not have nuts/seeds at all in her diet now, not even in fruits like strawberries. However, if they are very very finely ground to a total powder with no specks, she MIGHT be able to get away with just a little of it.
 
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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Currently we have sunflower seeds, walnuts, hemp hearts, almonds, and cashews at home.
Awesome! Thanks so much for checking it out, and I'm glad you gave it a read :)

The article and photos are nicely put together.


Could you double-check the article's statements about almonds being an excellent source of potassium? Although one cup of almonds contains 29% RDI of potassium, it also contains 824 calories!: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/nut-and-seed-products/3087/2 . A better source of potassium might be potatoes - a large baked potato contains 46% RDI of potassium, and only 278 calories: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2770/2 .
Thanks :) You know, we eat potatoes all the time at home and we never thought to consider them as a source of potassium. We really just eat them because they are tasty.

I regularly eat/use pumpkin seeds, flaxseeds, chia seeds, sunflower seeds, almonds, walnuts, and brazil nuts (great source of selenium). On occasion I use sesame seeds. Cashews are a rare treat (hard on my stomach) as are pistachios. I only consume a few tablespoons to a 1/4 cup per day of nuts/seeds though, sometimes a little less or more. Right now I have chia, flaxseed, sunflower seeds, and brazil nuts in my pantry.

There are many ways to incorporate nuts/seeds in the diet besides just consuming them directly too. I use almonds to make homemade vegan mayonnaise or grind them into a flour for baking/cooking. I also use either almonds or sunflower seeds ground up with garlic powder and nutritional yeast or other spices for vegan "parmesan" to go over pasta or other dishes. Chia seeds can be used for baking or to make puddings. I have also used just flaxseeds, dates, and water to make a frothy creamy homemade flaxseed milk in my high speed blender. I add calcium powder and vitamin D drops to my batch of flaxseed milk also. Great way to get omega 3s in daily. Nuts/seeds are a great base to make thick sauces like vegan alfredo or to make homemade vegan cream cheese or sliced cheese. I have also made homemade vegan almond sliced cheese blocks (with the help of agar flakes).

Not everyone can consume them though. My mother has diverticulitis/losis and was in the hospital for a week a year or so ago as it was so bad. She can not have nuts/seeds at all in her diet now, not even in fruits like strawberries. However, if they are very very finely ground to a total powder with no specks, she MIGHT be able to get away with just a little of it.
Nuts can be hard to digest, and they aren't for everyone, but we find them great in our diet. We are one on the lucky ones that decided to cut out animal products and eat plant based for the health benefits, and not because of an intolerance. I can only imagine things being that much more tricky if you had to cut out nuts completely.
 

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Impeach the gangster
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I keep sesame, sunflower, poppy, caraway, almond, pecan, walnut, flax (meal,) and cashew on hand. It's hard to imagine life without them.
 
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I sometimes use flax seeds for their Omega-3 content, but it's important to note that, for this, they really should be ground. They really don't digest well if they're swallowed whole.

I almost always have sunflower kernels on hand. But really, most nuts and seeds are so tempting to me that it's hard for me to keep them around long at all!
 

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A nut that I love that seems to be missed here is Brazil nuts. They are so creamy and delicious, can't go a few days without them. :)
 
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