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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Today, I was curious as to the percentage of vitamins, protein, carbs, and fats I am consuming for just one day.

I found that I'm consuming 76% of carbs.

I also found that I have a very small percentage of B12. I'm currently not taking any B12 vitamins, I might plan to purchase it later this month not for now. Any food suggestions for B12? Besides pills.

What I ate so far are the following:

Breakfast--

2 glasses of strawberry and tofu smoothie
1 small clementine

Lunch:
vegetable stir fry with soy sauce
a little more than a cup of rice (I'm Asian, gotta have my rice! lol)

snack:

"ants on a log" = 3 sticks of celery, peanut butter spread on each stalk top, raisins (about less than a 1.5 oz small package)

Dinner:
Haven't decided yet.

Anyway, is this a normal carb intake on a daily basis? It seems a lot of carb intake for a vegetable base diet? I was wondering the difference of other people here on the board.
 

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For a healthy adult the book Becoming Vegan recommends the following percent of calories from each of the macro-nutrients:
carbs: 55-75%
fat: 15-30%
protein: 10-15%

The Nutritional Science class i took last year gave the following figures from the Acceptable Macro-nutrient Distribution Range (AMDR)
Carbs- 45-65%
Protein- 10-35%
Fat- 20-35%

I tend to eat around 65% of my calories from carbs.
There are a variety of foods fortified with B12 such as some non-dairy "milks", breakfast cereals, protein/nutrient bars, nutritional yeast, etc. Nasoya even has some tofus with added vitamins.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by faded_amaranth View Post

For a healthy adult the book Becoming Vegan recommends the following percent of calories from each of the macro-nutrients:
carbs: 55-75%
fat: 15-30%
protein: 10-15%

The Nutritional Science class i took last year gave the following figures from the Acceptable Macro-nutrient Distribution Range (AMDR)
Carbs- 45-65%
Protein- 10-35%
Fat- 20-35%

I tend to eat around 65% of my calories from carbs.
There are a variety of foods fortified with B12 such as some non-dairy "milks", breakfast cereals, protein/nutrient bars, nutritional yeast, etc. Nasoya even has some tofus with added vitamins.
Awesome information! Thank you so much.

Another thing, how would I cut back on the carbs to range between 55-75%? If most foods, such as vegetables, have carbs?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ecl23 View Post

Another thing, how would I cut back on the carbs to range between 55-75%? If most foods, such as vegetables, have carbs?
You don't want to. Optimal carbohydrate intake should comprise 80% of your total calories. Human beings run on sugar. Everything you eat must be turned into glucose before your body can use it for fuel. That doesn't mean you should just eat refined sugar though. All it means is that if you are not getting enough whole food carbohydrate, your health will suffer in the long term, because excess protein and excess fat are both harmful, and though they can be converted to glucose in times of famine, this is a last resort process the body can use to prevent death from starvation.
 

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Please, don't get me wrong. I'm not here to promote low-carb diets or anything like that, but during my eating-disordered years i've read a lot of literature on nutrition and digestion and just for the sake of science I'd like to point out that what you are saying here is not exactly correct:

Quote:
Originally Posted by SomebodyElse View Post

You don't want to. Optimal carbohydrate intake should comprise 80% of your total calories. Human beings run on sugar. Everything you eat must be turned into glucose before your body can use it for fuel. That doesn't mean you should just eat refined sugar though. All it means is that if you are not getting enough whole food carbohydrate, your health will suffer in the long term, because excess protein and excess fat are both harmful, and though they can be converted to glucose in times of famine, this is a last resort process the body can use to prevent death from starvation.
Contrary to popular belief human bodies don't need carbs to function. A human can survive years without carbs or on a low-carb intake - and if done right - with no consiquences for health. Fats and protein on the other hand are indispensable. Fat or protein dificiency can lead to muscle loss, the inability to absord certain nutrients and eventually organ demage (including brain). Have you ever heard of carb dificiency? I don't think so.

And no, the body doesn't need to turn everything we eat into glucose. It's true that glucose is the preferred fuel for the body, because it's the easiest and fastest fuel. But in the absence of carbohydrates the body just start to burn off fat (from food or body tissue) for energy. The fat is first broken down to fatty acids and glycerol (lipolysis) and then into glucose (gluconeogenesis) or the fatty acids can be then broken down into energy directly with the production of ketone bodies (ketogenesis), that can be also used for energy. Amino acids from protein can be used to produce glucose as well.

Most organs can function perfectly on ketones. Some organs, for instance, heart and kidneys, actually prefer ketones to glucose and work better on this type of fuel. The only organ that really needs glucose to function is brain and it can get enough of it from fat and protein. And in time, the brain adjusts and starts using even less glusose (70% ketones, 30% glucose).

Traditional inuits lived on low-carb diets for centuries. They lived off of almost exclusively meat and fish and had a very-low carb intake. And none of them died drom carb dificiency as far as scientists know...

Speaking of inuits, their diet was almost 75% fat and yet, they had a low rate of heart deseases. We, vegerians love to think that meat (and fat in it) is the cause of all the problems, but the inuit diet proves it wrong. Excessive fats are only harmful for your body combined with excessive carbs. Fats on their own aren't harmful (except for trans fats, of course). Too much protein can be bad if you have, for example, some health problems to begin with, sick kidneys for instance. Healthy individuals should've a problem.

We just got used to think that we need a lot of carbs to function because of the USDA pyramid, but this pyramid was created without proper research and by the same people who claimed that dairy products are essential. Modern doctors and nurtitionist agree that these pyramid is seriously flawed.

That being said, we of course don't have to eat like inuits. We can be perfectly healthy on a vegetarian doet with lots of carbs. You don't have to worry about getting to many carbs. Just make sure you're getting enough of the good fats and protein and the carb intake will adjust by itself!

Good luck!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by longstocking View Post

Have you ever heard of carb dificiency? I don't think so.
Yes, in Biochemistry and Nutritional Science.

Nerve cells and red blood cells need glucose to function. The body can use fat and protein for fuel but the system backs up and stops functioning if there are not at least some carbs going thru the system. The Inuit example is the exception to the rule because some species of Arctic fish have odd-numbered fatty acids; most fatty acids in nature are even-numbered and the odd-numbered ones behave differently and are better at making products for, i think, the Krebs cycle.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by longstocking View Post

Contrary to popular belief human bodies don't need carbs to function.
I wish you wouldn't post this kind of nonsense online where it can influence people. I'm talking about what is optimal, not what a human body is capable of resorting to under extremely abnormal conditions. Using the Inuit, probably the least healthy and shortest-lived group of humans in existence, as proof that human beings do not need glucose as fuel is frankly ludicrous.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by faded_amaranth View Post

Yes, in Biochemistry and Nutritional Science.

Nerve cells and red blood cells need glucose to function. The body can use fat and protein for fuel but the system backs up and stops functioning if there are not at least some carbs going thru the system. The Inuit example is the exception to the rule because some species of Arctic fish have odd-numbered fatty acids; most fatty acids in nature are even-numbered and the odd-numbered ones behave differently and are better at making products for, i think, the Krebs cycle.
Quote:
Originally Posted by SomebodyElse View Post

I wish you wouldn't post this kind of nonsense online where it can influence people. I'm talking about what is optimal, not what a human body is capable of resorting to under extremely abnormal conditions. Using the Inuit, probably the least healthy and shortest-lived group of humans in existence, as proof that human beings do not need glucose as fuel is frankly ludicrous.
People, people! I didn't mean to start off a debate or, heaven forbid, "influence" anyone into cutting off carbs out of their diets. All I said is that human bodies can function in the absence of carbs from food. There is a difference between needing carbs to function and needing to *ingest* carbs to function. Everything I have read indicates that while the brain needs them, the liver can make all that is needed (gluconeogenesis was mentioned above), the advantage being that the liver will not tend to make more than is needed.

And faded_amaranth, a question for you then, if there is such thing as carbohydrate dificiency, please tell me what the adverse effects on health? maybe you know, some studies, because I'm honestly curious. But please, don't let it be another article where the author keeps confusing ketoacidosis and normal ketosis.

As for inuits, they were just an example that you don't die in a month (or a year) after cutting off all carbs. Yes, I've read about Vilhjalmur Stefansson's study and indeed Inuits diet is rich in fish and the combination of the omega-3' and omega-6's in it apperantly helps to balance out the bad fats in meat. And I never said their diet was very healthy.

And I stress again, that I in no way, was trying to proof that we shouldn't eat carbs. And frankly, I don't think it's that easy to not get enough carbs on a vegan diet.
 
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