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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recall, as a child, always being bothered by the "cuteness" of baby Sheep, Cows, etc., while at the same time eating the flesh of adult ones (because I was told humans had to). At night I would always pray (I used to believe in God because I was told to) that the suffering of all (humans and non-humans) would end.

These days (in fact, since becoming veg*n over a decade ago) I've never figured out the "love" people seem to have for baby "farm" animals, while being okay with eating their flesh once they have grown up.

At the Sydney Royal Easter Show they have "petting Zoos" where you can hold/play with baby "farm" animals, while the whole time the place is selling the cooked flesh of their slaughtered elders. And it's not just here; there are plenty of "baby animal petting" places.

It's not even restricted to the young..... many find mature non-humans "cute" or whatever, yet think nothing of eating them.

But then we also find the young of our own species in some way more "worthy" of protection.

http://home.iprimus.com.au/ia1hp/writings/sap/tot.txt
 

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It's called the carres-factor over here.

The better you can pet, stroke or carress a animal the higher the support will be.

(baby seals !)
 

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It is just the way we are taught! You have to love YOUR pet ie, YOUR cat, YOUR dog... but even so, the love they tell you to give IT is a way to exploit them! For you imprison them their whole life, you use them, you exhibit them, ect... as long as animals are considered as properties, you have no chance to notice any change. They don't even feel guilty carressing a calf, then 10 minutes later eating his brother! That is just how institutions govern us... YAKKKK!
 

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It's social conditioning. As very young children, we are fed meat very regularly so it becomes one of those things we feel we have to eat. A 2 year old doesn't know where the chicken nuggets came from. By the time we know where it came from, we are so conditioned to believe that we must eat meat to live and that the animals should be killed for us, so it isn't a big deal to ooh and ahh over a baby cow then eat a burger.
 

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As soon as I learned that meat was an animal, (I really had to be told, otherwise how would I know what a steak really was?), it made me feel uneasy. I decided right then and there that I wouldn't eat it anymore. My mom convinced me that I would starve since she was the only one cooking for me. I think I was about 9 years old....maybe younger at the time. Over a short period of time, I gave up and went back to eating meat. I think it took like a day, seriously. I also remember questioning my mom about my rabbit's foot that I had and asking her if it was real. She told me that they got them from rabbits that they found already dead. This was just so evil, and being a child I believed her, and felt slightly better about it. I think it's true that people just condition themselves to be numb to it.
 

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I can remember as a child that I was sickened by the idea of animals but I was led to beleive that is just how things are and that people have to eat animal. As I got older, I learned that that isn't a justification for anything.
 

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well, people DO eat veal and lamb and don't seem to care that just a short while before a lamb shank is grilled and served up, it was a gentle little baby. for chrissake, what is more symbolically gentle and sweet than a baby lamb?
 

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Yeah, I agree with muppetcow... you are conditioned to think that meat is necessary... I always had a pang of remorse when patting baby cows and always asked if we could save "this one please" but of course, not happening. Friends of the family had a beef cattle farm, and they named two of the heifers after mum and I... I could recognise them and everything... being heifers they weren't sold as meat (they may have been when they got old, I don't know) but still... not a nice life.
 

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Lisa: "What's the difference between this lamb and the one that kissed me?"

It's really sad how kids are taught to eat meat, and made to think they're crazy if they question it. I remember thinking how gross chicken was when I was little, and my older sister basically told me I was crazy.
 

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What puzzles me is the way we treat cats and dogs vs. cows, pigs, and chickens. Now, in my opinion, their intelligence level is pretty much irrelevant, but I have read many things that say that pigs are pretty much as smart as dogs. Now, why is it ok to put a sow in a tiny cage where they can barely move, imprisoned- or to reap the beak off a chicken- but if you were to kick a dog or pull a cats whiskers out, that would be totally cruel! (and it would be.) I just don't understand the double standard for different types of animals, and I never will.

I can still remember the first time they told me meat was from a cow. I was disgusted, but too young and apathetic to care. It wasn't until I was 13 or so that I was finally able to stand up for myself and become a vegetarian....

Right, so thats my story...


lovenlight,

linz
 

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Funny thing. I grew up on a farm and knew early on where meat came from. It was a part of everyday life but my parents were open minded enough to let me make my own decisions. I was eight the first time I decided to refuse meat. I had a cow who I loved dearly and I decided not to eat meat. My dad, who was a big meat eater at the time, just told my I had to research other sources of protein. He never forced me to eat meat or told me it was necessary. I did start eating chicken again but I stayed away from all other meat until I was 17 (I never did like seafood so that wasn't an issue.) When I was 17 I started eating red meat here and there because of a guy I was dating. How stupid was that!?!


My daughter, who is three, questions where meat comes from already. I am veg, my SIL is veg, and so is my mom. The mom of my daughter's bestfriend is vegan. So, Fiona (my daughter) has been exposed to lots of vegetarians but I have never pushed the idea on her. I answer her questions simply. She also has lots of omnis in her life so she gets to see that some people choose to eat meat and others don't. She asks often where certain foods come from and why people eat what they eat. At three, she can already make the connection. I know she will make her own decisions!

About the baby animal thing, isn't there said to be some biological reason that we think babies are so cute? I read somewhere that we are genetically programmed to think babies (human and non-human) are adorable so we will protect and care for them thus keeping them alive. Anyone know more about this?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by pickletatertot

About the baby animal thing, isn't there said to be some biological reason that we think babies are so cute? I read somewhere that we are genetically programmed to think babies (human and non-human) are adorable so we will protect and care for them thus keeping them alive. Anyone know more about this?
I think it has something to do with big eyes.
 

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i couldn't tell what it has to do with, but i've stayed a very long time hating humans babies, i couldn't find them beautiful. today i still can't find them cute or anything, but i appreciate them. In the contrary, i used to find every single animal baby soooooooooo cuuuuuuuuuuuuuute!! Now i'm just considerering EVERY baby as an individual, as a futur adult who will make choices, then i'm just trying to like everyone for who s/he is and if possible to help them going vegan... well, today's children are the parents of our futur generations...
 

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Beady-eyed "vegetarians" is an appropriate name for those who call themselves veg but eat fish and chicken, because they only eat animals with beady, non-cute eyes. Being able to look into someone's eyes does make you feel more connected with them.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Kurmudgeon

I think it has something to do with big eyes.
I've never seen prettier, bigger, more gorgeously long-lashed eyes on an animal than I have on a cow. Watching at a newborn calf is enough to make your heart melt.

I too hate the hipocrisy of the Royal Easter Show. I have never been to it (nor will I ever go), but I cannot understand how people can be thinking "aww, how cute are those little piglets" one minute, then the next be watching them diving off a high platform into icy cold water, or, worse still, biting into a hotdog.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by pickletatertot

Funny thing. I grew up on a farm and knew early on where meat came from. It was a part of everyday life but my parents were open minded enough to let me make my own decisions.
I am a little curious about this. I understand that in the past, farm people had to kill their own animals for food (i.e. the farmer is also the butcher). How did farm kids react to this? How did the father convince the farm kids to butcher an animal despite all the blood and gore? Do the farm kids suffer from combat fatigue when dealing with the butchering animals?

Since most of the US population is urbanized and have never butchered an animal in their lives, it is easier for the kids to be grossed out when told that meat comes from animals. But what about farm kids? How do they react to this?
 

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If you want to talk about irony, I have a story for you. Last summer, my husband and I took our then two year old granddaughter to a county fair. They had one large tent set up as a kind of petting zoo. Bales of straw were stacked to make pens for baby and small sized animals, and the kids could climb in and pet the animals. Above each pen, there was a sign that listed all the products that would be made when the animal was slaughtered. EVERYBODY was cooing over the animals, saying things like "How adorable; Don't you just want to take that cute little black and white pig home; etc." In the next breath they would be reading the signs, and saying things like "Oh, I never knew that they use the hooves to make...." (not in a tone of disgust, but one of clinical interest.) I couldn't believe that I was the only person who saw the horrible hypocrisy of it. It was like some awful black comedy.
 

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Rushabh-I grew up on a small farm and we did butcher animals. Mostly pigs. We also had a commercial chicken house. We did it all, from giving vaccinations to feeding calfs from bottles. I always hated the butchering from the time I was very small. But, I was used to it and I don't think it traumatized me. I can honestly say that my family worked hard and used EVERY part of the animal. I know this is gross, but I have a lot more respect for farmers than I do for people who kill animals for sport or factory farmers. I also have more respect for meateaters who work hard for their food and really know where it comes from than for those who would rather live in ignorance and pretend their hamburger grew on a tree. I guess most farm kids accept that this is a natural part of life. I never thought bad of my dad for being and farmer (and I still don't, my dad is one of the smartest, hardest working men I know) but I did question the whole process and decided eating meat was wrong for me.

The commercial chicken house is another story entirely. Our animals on our farm were treated well for the most part but no one who has ever seen a commercial chicken house in operation can argue that it's humane. It's really quite hellish. My mom, who was the main operator of the chicken house, is vegetarian herself now...partially because of it!
 

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I also want to add that I think a farm is a wonderful place for children to grow up! My brothers and I had a great childhood. I get the impression that some people see farming as all about killing animals. We spent much more time caring for animals, playing in the barn and hayloft, running in the fields, playing in the woods or in the stream. And working too. My dad instilled an amazing work ethic in us. We had gardens and cornfields and everyone had work to do. I want to have a farm of my own someday. My idea is to rescue animals from lifestock sales and let them live with us happily ever after. My husband thinks I'm a little crazy, but he goes along with my ideas! I want my daughters to have the experience of living on a farm.
 
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