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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,<br><br>
I have a question for the fine folks of this board. It will however take a little bit of time to explain so please bear with me.<br><br>
In my attempts to go full vegan, I have been experimenting with making my own non-dairy milks (almond, rice, and soy examples as of this point). While I have had some progress, --they were all drinkable, and usable for cooking purposes to some degree -- I am running into a matter which is of cause for irritation to me. The materials used settle somewhat to the bottom of the container after being in the fridge for a while.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/huh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":confused:"> There's not a perfect settling out of ingredients, but it is disturbing to see a translucent tea-like substance suspended over a surface of "sediment".<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/mad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":mad:"><br><br>
Now, as anyone who has consumed Silk's soy milk, and/or Blue Diamond's Almond breeze knows, those two products do not settle out all that bad even after having been in the fridge. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/cool3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":cool:"> While, yes, they do settle out a little, they are angelic by comaprison to the typical 1/4 inch I see in the bottom of my tea pitcher(2 qt) which is purposed solely for the task.<br><br>
This brings me to my question. Does any one here know how they manage to keep their products in suspension so well? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/huh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":huh:"> I'm racking my brains trying to figure out what I can do to keep my milks from looking like something I scooped out of a puddle along the side of the road.<br><br>
Just as an FYI,<br>
My method is typically to place the base material(most recently almonds) in a food processor with double it's volume of water, and blend until a milk-like substance can be seen through the blending carafe. Then I filter out the larger bits of sediment over a wire mesh strainer and a double layer of cheesecloth for the finer sediment that is always present. What is left in the pitcher is a thin milk-like fluid which I then add a liquid sweetener to(i.e. agave nectar, corn syrup, or a simple syrup made of turbinado sugar and water). <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/rockon.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":rockon:"> The results make up a very nice milk, but then promptly turn into the aforementioned seperation after a mere hour in the fridge. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/sad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":("> Suggestions for improvement would be most appreciated.<br><br>
BTW If somehow I have overlooked a previous thread which has already answered this question, please point it out to me. I would be most grateful and would happily eat my words if I could find a workable solution. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/thumbsup.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":up:"><br><br>
Thanks,
 

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maybe im not fully understanding the problem, but can't you just shake it up or stir it before using it?<br><br>
i do this with juices like orange juice and always give my boxed plant milks a shake before pouring
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
luvourmother, yes, I can and do shake the milk after it has settled because I know that it will "reconstitute" that way. What I'm asking is how do Blue Diamond and Silk manage to make their milks stay milky for so long(if it's known to you) when mine would have settled out into it's two layers by that time.<br><br>
I ask this because I've noticed that the most Silk or Almond Breeze will settle out in an hour's time is a barely noticable trace of grit as opposed to my 1/4 inch layer. Is there some secret to it I'm not aware of that maintains the milky quality without shaking?<br><br>
peacefulveglady, yes, I read that too when i first started looking for ways to simulate Silk's version of soymilk. The first recipe I came across said that that was one of the down sides to the process of that recipe(settling) and that shaking was necessary. I was merely curious how Silk and Blue Diamond managed to get their products to remain so admirably thick and milky under the same storage conditions when my version would seperate so badly. I suppose it's a trade secret, and I will just have to put up with the difference but it would be nice to know what that difference is.<br><br>
Do you suppose it's because they can grind their materials finer, and thus they stay milky longer when blended?<br>
Do you suppose they have added something during their blending process that prevents precipitation and therefore seperation?<br>
That is what I'm getting at. I apologize if my wording in the OP was confusing. That was not my intent.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
carageenan, huh? Hmm. ok well that answers my question. Thank you.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D">
 
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