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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have had autoimmune thyroiditis for over ten years, had a large tumor removed, etc. Soy does cause my autoimmune antibodies to act up (hair falls out, I get tired, feel like garbage, gain weight, etc) and my doc wants me to stay away from it for the most part to avoid the tumors coming back and the autoimmune reaction.

I hate that such an "easy" source of protein is not available to me. I went to get seitan at the Whole Foods, and every brand has soy flour in it. I found a recipe online for making seitan with whole wheat flour. Has anyone tried that?

Any other ideas? Nuts, bean, seeds, etc are what I'm doing now, along with my unfortunate cheese addiction. I drink so-delicious coconut milk.

Does rice cheese melt well and taste ok?

Thanks for your thoughts.
 

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I had rice cheese once and it was gross. I can't remember which brand it was. I just remember it was gross. Daiya cheese is great, though, and soy-free. It's good melted, but not so much cold, straight outta the bag. Can you have fermented soy like soy sauce and miso, or is all soy pretty much out?
 

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As far as easy protein, I like hummus. I usually have some made up and ready to go in the fridge, along with some veggies. I like lentils too. They cook quickly and are versatile. They can be mashed and fried to create a faux ground beef, or made into soup. Quinoa is good too. High protein and it cooks in a few minutes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Good ideas, thanks! I will look into the Daiya and have been thinking about making chick pea spread for sandwiches. I don't know about fermented soy for sure, but since it's a health issue, I don't want to take too many chances. I'd just rather avoid it if possible. Thanks again for replying and for the good ideas... I'll be heading out to Whole Foods again soon.
 

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I don't eat soy either, and it ends up making the cost of my grocery bill MUCH less than vegans that do eat soy products, especially fake meats and cheeses.

If you eat enough calories and include a variety of fruits and veggies you will get enough protein. It is not something to worry about if your diet is balanced.

I make beans 2-3 times a week, eat brown rice and other whole grains, stick to veggies and fruit that are in season (cheaper and tastes better). Protein is the least of my dietary concerns and I even require more than average bc I have an active job and active hobbies.
 

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The vegan cookbook 'Veganomicon' has a non-soy flour Seitan recipe. I'm not a huge fan of seitan, but I made their "Chickpea Cutlets" which has the vital wheat gluten in them and they were delicious!! My parents (not vegetarian) said it tasted like chicken. I don't know about that, but it definitely had a meaty taste... I don't care about that so much since I never ate beef even before I turned to vegetarianism, but it was still good.


Also, I have a couple of good chickpea spread recipes if you are looking for some. Peace --
 

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Here is a soy free vegan blog (the last post was 2008, so not sure how good some of the information is). This blog is a little more recent. However, it's also gluten free, so use your own descretion. This is another message board, dealing with books and websites about soy free vegans and vegetarians. And last but not least, About.com has some resources to help you out, too. If you're wondering where I found all this, I just used Google. I hope these all help.
 

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I also can't eat soy. It was frustrating at first but I think I'm getting the hang of it. So here are my suggestions, spouted off in no particular order:

-Soy-free faux meats exist. Sunshine Burgers are made from brown rice, adzuki beans and seasonings, and they have a few different flavors. Field Roast also has some nice stuff, and relies mostly on wheat gluten. The sausages and deli slices are soy-free, and it looks like their new hot dogs are too. I also believe Quorn products are soy-free, but I haven't tried them because the "mycoprotein" main ingredient freaks me out a little. I actually don't eat fake meat that much, but it's nice to have on hand sometimes.

-I put nuts and seeds on salads - a handful of chickpeas and some sunflower seeds go a long way to making a salad more filling. I also make bean chili and vegetable soup with a can of beans or two added - use any recipe you like and just add the beans to the other vegetables. Also, season black beans by frying them in a bit of oil with chili powder and cumin. Use them to fill up burritos or tacos, then add other veggies and rice if you like. (For pre-made bread, wraps and buns without soy, check out Whole Foods and health food shops. There are usually at least a few options.)

-Anytime I make a sandwich, I use big, generous dollops of hummus on both pieces of bread. It helps the veggies stick, tastes great and adds a punch of protein.

-If you like coconut milk, you might also like almond milk. That's what I use.

-You mentioned nuts. My favorite ones to snack on are almonds and cashews. I use an all-natural peanut butter that doesn't have soybean oil in it, too - you can find those at any grocery store. There's a soy-free version of Vegenaise for when it comes to mayo.

-Soy-free crackers: Carr's table water crackers. Water crackers in general are often safe; just check labels to make sure. Crackers are great because you can load them up with goodies like hummus, guacamole or bean dip.

-Chickpea salad recipe: mash chickpeas with a fork so they resemble tuna fish. Chop in some red onion and green celery. Add a little mayo/mayo substitute and mustard, and some dill weed and lemon juice if you have it. Stir it all up. It's veg*n-ized tuna salad, basically. Great on sandwiches, in wraps or on crackers, and very good for you.

-WATCH OUT for cooking spray and vegetable oil. They're usually pure soy.

I have the same frustration as you about the seitan in the stores
I'm going to try making my own out of vital wheat gluten sometime.

Good luck! Feel free to shoot me a message anytime - I totally feel your pain on this, and maybe we can share ideas
 

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Eat anything and everything with hempseeds! seriously, they're high in complete protein and don't have any of the weird stuff soy has.
 

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I didn't see anyone mention quinoa yet, it's a complete protein and totally soy free. It has all the essential amino acids in it, and can be added to soups, stews, or used for mediterranean/Indian dishes. Also, millet and whole wheat couscous are great protein options too
 
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